/ Training with heart rate monitor

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doz generale - on 04 May 2012
I'm thinking of getting one of these to focus my cycling a bit more, and to monitor my fitness. Any one here use one? What are the benefits?
woolsack - on 04 May 2012
In reply to doz generale: Just bought one, cheapy one so that my kids don't find me slumped over the bars of my training bike on the turbo with a cardiac arrest

Unless you can read microdots avoid the 19.95 Tesco One Body one, the instructions are impossible without a microscope.

Seems to work OK though. More by luck than judgement
Pocoyo - on 04 May 2012
In reply to doz generale:

This nugget of info has come from the Garmin site, I use a Garmin 705 and have done the following to give a rough outline of my LHRT, if your H/R monitor lets you split your heart rate into zones this can give great info for training even interval training on a daily commute,if your monitor allows it will set the zones for you if you work out your max heart rate using the (220 minus your age = predicted max heart rate) this will give you a rough idea!

Get your bike on a turbo trainer and give the following a blast, Im no expert in fitness but this info has served me well and works for me, hope it helps :)

Lacate Heart Rate Threshold

Warm up for 15 minutes to Z2 or Z3 with last 3 minutes easy
Press the lap button and start a 30 minute run at the best pace you can maintain for 30 minutes. (Better to start out slightly easy and build, than too hard and die!)
After 10 mins press the lap button again.
After 20 mins press the lap button again.
Cool down to easy for 15 mins.

As a workout it would look like this:

Go 15 minutes no target
Go 10 minutes no target
Go 20 minutes no target
Go 15 minutes no target

The average heart rate for the 20 mins is your LT number. Calculate your training zones as follows:

Zone 1: Active recovery 65-75% of LT
In this zone you are burning primarily body fat for energy. You should be in this zone for recovery rides, for warm-ups and cool-downs and also for the easy portion of long rides. Training in this zone helps to build your endurance for tours and ultra races.

Zone 2: Aerobic 75 - 85% of LT
In this zone you are burning a mix of fat and glycogen (carbs) for energy. Training in this zone will improve your ability to transport oxygen. You should be in this zone much of the time during rides over three or four hours, except for climbs in zone 3.

Zone 3: Threshold 85-95% of LT
In this zone you are burning primarily glycogen for energy. Training here will improve your efficiency burning carbohydrates. You should be in this zone most of the time when climbing. You will have better endurance if you can climb in zone 3 and ride the flats and rollers in zone 2, instead of climbing at a higher heart rate and then taking a long time to recover in zone 1.

Zone 4: Lactate 95 - 105% of LT
In this zone you are burning glycogen for energy, but without enough oxygen, so you are going anaerobic. Training in this zone builds speed and your tolerance for lactate acid and over time raises your lactate threshold. This training is hard on your body and it takes a day or two to recover.

Zone 5: VO2 >105% of LT
In this zone, you are working completely anaerobically. Short efforts in this zone will increase your VO2 max, the ability of your body to transport oxygen to the working muscles.

As noted, you are likely to find attaining Z2 means that you will have to slow down. Most people train at a far higher intensity than they should be.
doz generale - on 04 May 2012
In reply to Pocoyo:

Cheers for the info. Odd that the best fat burning excercise is relativly low paced!

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Pocoyo - on 04 May 2012
In reply to doz generale: No probs, Im sure this being UKC someone may declare it rhubarb in which case i may learn something too.

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