/ Trekking poles

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Totally-Normal - on 11 May 2012
I'm looking to buy a set of poles for this summer to help me be more stable when carrying big loads up to our base camp. A bit of research tells me I have two options, antishock or standard.

I'm kind of leaning towards standard as it has less to go wrong, is more expensive and is heavier but I've never used poles before so really i have no idea, hopefully someone can help me out

Thanks in advance

calum
GrahamD - on 11 May 2012
In reply to taylorct:

I've never seemn the point of antishock, since you place the tip of the pole on the ground, not hammer it in.

After years of being frustrated by none locking or seizing up pole mechanisms (from a variety of supposedly reputable makes) I''d go for flick lock mechanisms every time now.
pog100 - on 11 May 2012
In reply to taylorct:

I had anti-shock, which you can 'turn off', but in fact never used it. I prefer just a straightforward pole. It is also less likely to fail or corrode.
More important in my experience is the locking mechanism. 10 years using the 'internal expansion' Leki ones tells me that they have quite a few problems at times. I would definitely recommend one of the ones which has an external click lock mechanism. Some of the more recent Leki poles have this, and they work well, BD have had it on their poles for yonks.
pog100 - on 11 May 2012
In reply to GrahamD:

Snap!
Totally-Normal - on 11 May 2012
In reply to taylorct: So it seems anti locking is a bit of a waste of money then?

Also i made a bit of an error in my initial post, i meant to say standard is lighter and cheaper.
almost sane - on 11 May 2012
In reply to taylorct:
I'd avoid anti-shock - more weight and more to go wrong for little benefit.

I've owned and used a number of poles over the years, and I strongly recommend those with external locking, either click or external flick mechanisms. As has been said, BD do these, as do Grivel and Karrimor. These are less likely to jam, and are easier to operate when the poles and your hands are cold and wet.

A couple of weeks ago Sports Direct in Falkirk had carbon fibre poles with external locks for sale at 25 a pair - bargain!
In reply to taylorct: Absolutely no benefit in antishock poles, and a few key disadvantages too - for the reasons others have given
In reply to Dan Bailey - UKHillwalking.com: But just to muddy the waters, in contrast to most other posters i have never had problems with poles that have a twistlock mechanism - you just need to look after them a bit.
martinph78 on 11 May 2012
In reply to taylorct: I wouldn't bother with anti-shock for tyhe reasons given above. Also they seem to take some of teh energy out of the system, which is energy you could be using to proepl yourself forward if using the poles in that way rather than just for balance.

Another vote for teh Black Diamond flick-locks.

Might be worth you buying a cheap set of poles (5 at Go Outdoors or Aldi's sometimes!) to try them. Find out if you use them often enough to spend more and find out what breaks. It'll give you a better idea of what to look for in an expensive set.

Failing that just get the BD Trail Poles and enjoy :o)
GeoffRadcliffe - on 11 May 2012
In reply to taylorct: Another vote for Black Diamond Flick Locks.

I had lots of problems with twist-lock mechanisms.
benghull - on 11 May 2012
In reply to taylorct:

Got a pair of the Grivel himalaya trail poles from Rock and Run for 45 the other week, after messing around with cheap twist lock poles before these where so easy to use, folded out and slotted together quickly where super light and not once did i miss having any anti-shock qualities etc about them.
In reply to Dan Bailey - UKHillwalking.com:
> But just to muddy the waters, in contrast to most other posters i have never had problems with poles that have a twistlock mechanism

Same here, at least with well designed ones like Leki. I have had flicklocks freeze over, need time and swiss army knife to open them!

Gentleman Antiquarian - on 13 May 2012
In reply to benghull:
Seconding the Grivel Himalayas - very good. Very light, extremely well made and seem to have good mechanicals. Only downside is that the wrist loops aren't adjustable but I'm going to ask my Auntie Gwen to sort that (she's a demon with needle and thread)
Pennine - on 13 May 2012
In reply to taylorct: and another vote for Black Diamond Flick Locks.
Totally-Normal - on 13 May 2012
In reply to taylorct: Just bought I set of black diamond expedtion poles off someone off UKC. Looking forward to getting my hands on them.

Thanks for all the advice.
Baron Weasel - on 14 May 2012
In reply to taylorct: Two words: Pacer Poles! Having used them for a couple of years now I wouldn't use any others...

The Baron
In reply to Baron Weasel: Indeed. Another vote for Pacer Poles from me.
jimtitt - on 14 May 2012
In reply to Dan Bailey - UKHillwalking.com:
You might be interested to know that the boss of Leki, Klaus Lenhart (son of Karl Lenhart the company founder) died in an aircraft accident two weeks ago.
In reply to jimtitt: That's bad news Jim.
thomas - on 15 May 2012
In reply to taylorct: Big offer on leki Poles at present on sportpursuit website works out between 30 and 70% off, a selection of poles. (Join for free on line) and gets lots of bargains from them from top gear manufacturers Hagloffs, Scarpa etc Another bit re. the poles...rather than go for the Aluminium variety try the Carbon poles..much much lighter I've had the same pair for about five years now...used in the alps, kili, Scotland etc swear by them twist lock, no anti shock and good grip which takes a large pair of mitts no probs.
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