/ Rationing wild camping

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AdCo82 on 14 May 2012
When off on a wild camp for one night, how cheap (not including petrol) can you make it?

By still giving yourself a lunch on both days, a good and filling evening meal, breakfast and drinks, just how cheap can you make it and how???

AT
Hardonicus - on 14 May 2012
In reply to An Triubhas: Teabags and a fishing rod/spear?
In reply to An Triubhas: You can make it no more expensive than having those meals at home, so what exactly is the difference?
Kevin Woods - on 14 May 2012
In reply to An Triubhas: Hard to give an exact answer but I'll be honest and say usually twice as expensive I always planned, normally accompanied by that sinking feeling.
Alex Slipchuk on 14 May 2012
In reply to nickinscottishmountains:
> (In reply to An Triubhas) You can make it no more expensive than having those meals at home, so what exactly is the difference?

Got to agree with you, apart from winter when you tend to need to eat a lot more due to cold. Food always tastes better and you'll have less waste when cooked wild.
butteredfrog - on 14 May 2012
In reply to Kevin Woods:
> (In reply to An Triubhas) Hard to give an exact answer but I'll be honest and say usually twice as expensive I always planned, normally accompanied by that sinking feeling.

Hole in thermarest?
Kevin Woods - on 14 May 2012
In reply to butteredfrog: Camped in a bog.
Siward on 15 May 2012
In reply to An Triubhas: Water and uncooked porage oats. About 50p.
edunn on 15 May 2012
In reply to An Triubhas:

A sh1tload of coffee and some Peruvian marching powder should keep the cost down!
mlmatt - on 15 May 2012
In reply to An Triubhas:

It can be as cheap or as expensive as you like to be honest. If I was trying to make it as cheap as possible I'd just cook up some decent food at home before hand and reheat it with my stove. I'll assume you've got teabags around the house but you might want to purchase some powdered milk.

If you want to buy food, but still keep the price down then Tesco do noodles for about 9p a packet. Apparently ASDA's noodles are even cheaper, but I don't shop there I'm afriad.

Bon Chance!
geordiepie - on 15 May 2012
In reply to edunn:

If your marching powder is that cheap it's probably all glucose.

To the OP:

Porridge for breakfast
Most sources of carbs are cheap i.e. pasta, rice, potatoes
For protein anything with beans/pulses in
Bars of chocolate...as cheap as you can stomach
Dauphin - on 15 May 2012
In reply to An Triubhas:

Bag of jelly babies, 2 sarnies and 3 large cups of coffee does me 18-20 miles.
Forget all that filling meal nonsense you have to carry all the crap, it's fuel. Return to civilization, shower, nice meal.

D
AdCo82 on 15 May 2012
In reply to Dauphin: so you don't fancy anything warm????
Dauphin - on 16 May 2012
In reply to An Triubhas:

Maybe porridge if I can remember to bring it. Carton of 'ready soup' with tuna dropped into it. More crap to carry and spill over the contents of rucksack. Multi-dayers are different but again not that much a fan of cooking while being eaten alive by midges.

D
alooker - on 16 May 2012
In reply to An Triubhas: Porridge for breakfast (good with a bit of milk powder mixed in too), chocolate for lunch/snacks or flapjack if it's warm weather and then cup-a-soup and pasta/cous cous/rice with some salami for evening meal. Hardest part for me is not eating all the chocolate on the first day...
GrahamD - on 16 May 2012
In reply to An Triubhas:

The biggest single cost for me is gas. I'm too idle to bother with anything else to be honest, but a petrol stove would be my biggest saving.
Fatboy - on 18 May 2012
In reply to GrahamD: Gas can't taste too good? I imagine petrol is worse...
David Ponting on 18 May 2012
In reply to alooker: That sounds about right; cheapest option I've found being:

porridge with water only
soreen malt loaf (often 50p/loaf in the co-op)
cheap chocolate for snacks
pasta/salami/cheap sauce in the evening
AdCo82 on 18 May 2012
In reply to David Ponting: sounds my type of thing....but would rather take a little milk for the porridge!!!
alooker - on 18 May 2012
In reply to An Triubhas: I sneak a bit of milk powder and a squeeze of honey in mine!
top cat - on 19 May 2012
In reply to An Triubhas:

for one night, leave the stove at home (and all the kit that goes with it)
eat whatever takes your fancy that doesn't need cooking. Drink water.

very light, very cheap.

(if you are somewhere you can light a fire, did you know that you can heat water over the embers in poly bag? Yes, really. How much does a poly bag weigh compared to carrying a stove and pans?)
ollieollie - on 19 May 2012
In reply to edunn:
> (In reply to An Triubhas)
>
> A sh1tload of coffee and some Peruvian marching powder should keep the cost down!

ha

Southampton Tom on 19 May 2012
In reply to David Ponting: Spendthrift,
tesco value 'malted loaf' is about 19p

my housemate and I experimented with savoury porridge as a way of rationalising the stuff we took.

salami and cheese in porridge is pretty foul tbh
Ellie79 - on 19 May 2012
In reply to Southampton Tom: Sardines and tomato soup powder in porridge is also disgusting!!
subalpine - on 19 May 2012
In reply to Ellie79: whereas sardines, soup powder and fine rice noodles is sublime...
Wonrek - on 19 May 2012
In reply to Southampton Tom: Marmite in porridge is of an equally foul nature.

I suspect other than salt, savoury and porridge doesn't work too well!

My wild camp suggestion would be risotto. Take rice, stock cube and small amount of Parmesan. Yumm!

Cx
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jenniwat001 on 20 May 2012
In reply to An Triubhas:

Home bargins for chocolate, biscuits, noodles and dried pasta and sauces packs. Can feed two of us for about 2.50. I then "borrowed" a stove from my grandparents. Can't get much cheaper.

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