/ Question: using a sling direct on a wire

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ledifer on 20 May 2012
Yesterday I was on houndtor and whilst on a route struggling for gear found a decent nut placement. The only problem is that with the quickdraw crab going through the wire the crab was lying over the edge of the rock, and would have snapped if I taken a fall on it.
In the end I found a cam placement so used that instead.
The question is; rather than using a quickdraw. Could I have larksfooted a sling through the wire and clipped that to my rope instead?
I vaguely remember reading that you shouldn't put slings through wires but not really sure why.
Failing that is there a safe way of extending wires so that your carabiners aren't over an edge?
Brett ffitch - on 20 May 2012
In reply to ledifer:

DMM did some testing on this. Check out the knowledge section of their website.

http://dmmclimbing.com/knowledge/improvisation-larks-foot-or-basket-hitch-vid/
ledifer on 20 May 2012
In reply to Brett ffitch:
thanks thats great!
Al Randall on 20 May 2012
In reply to ledifer: Of course you could. There are no rules. I seem to recall that when wired nuts first appeared most people had a sling permanently attached directly to the wire. I certainly did but would only do it now if there was no alternative. I have visions of the wire acting like a cheese cutter but I'm sure it's not as bad as that and would probably hold at least one fall or at worst slow you down.

Al
highclimber - on 20 May 2012
In reply to Brett ffitch: I'd like to see the results for a drop test rather than a pull test to see if there's much difference.
teh_mark - on 20 May 2012
In reply to ledifer:

I'm curious to know if the sling would be damaged or weakened if a fall was taken on it, and how visible the damage would be.

I've just realised too - I still have your screwgate on my desk! I'm in Newcastle until Tuesday but I'll post it back the second I get home.
Simon Caldwell - on 20 May 2012
In reply to ledifer:
> the crab was lying over the edge of the rock, and would have snapped if I taken a fall on it.

I'd be surprised if it did
john arran - on 20 May 2012
In reply to ledifer:

Another option is to lark's foot a second wire to the first and then to clip the second as normal. Shouldn't see any significant reduction in strength this way, although it's perhaps not something you can do easily with one hand.
highclimber - on 20 May 2012
In reply to john arran: did you watch the video? oing what you said is only slightly worse than larksfooting a sling
jimtitt - on 20 May 2012
In reply to highclimber:
Did you read the results?
Hitching two nuts together was stronger than the rated strength of the nut.
john arran - on 20 May 2012
In reply to highclimber:

No I didn't watch the video but I'm curious as to why you think interlinking 2 wires would be a problem.
highclimber - on 20 May 2012
In reply to jimtitt:
> (In reply to highclimber)
> Did you read the results?
> Hitching two nuts together was stronger than the rated strength of the nut.

my statement is still true regardless of the minimum strength of said nut.

I didn't say there was a problem with it. I would much rather basket hitch in both instances.
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john arran - on 20 May 2012
In reply to highclimber:

I hadn't realised that the 2-wire method was included in the results table but the value returned isn't surprising. I'd say the advantage of this over using a sling is that it wouldn't abrade your sling if the rock edge was relatively sharp, since that change of angle seems to be what is preventing much of the force from being transmitted through to the primary wire. Other than that I don't see a lot of difference. If you're really (probably irrationally) worried that 7.6kN won't be enough you could always use a bigger wire as the linking element.

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