/ Nepal Evo's and Yeti gaiters-6500m?

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The Shelf Puffin - on 22 May 2012
Got an upcoming trip as a himalayan virgin to tackle some 6500m peaks, probably up to alpine AD/D standard. Anyway costs are critical (as always)so I was looking at my trusty nepal evos and thinking those with some yeti gaiters might do the trick. I have heard opinion from yes/no/maybe schools of thought so I thought I would throw it out to the good folk out there. Any assistance gratefully etc. PS never had cold feet in my boots, then again never been that high after a cold night in a tent with damp boots.

Thanks
Damo on 22 May 2012
In reply to The Shelf Puffin:
> ... high after a cold night in a tent with damp boots.
>

Yeh, that's the problem. It's probably more about how high you are camping, rather than the highest point you'll touch.

If it's a popular peak (Mera?) then you can have a long summit day and camp relatively low. If it's a first ascent of a 6500m peak then you might need to camp quite high - and still have a long summit day.

Karakoram midday in August will be hot. TienShan 6500m = cold. Nepal in November will be cold. So you probably need to be a bit more specific about what you're doing. If in doubt, use modern doubles.

Hannes on 22 May 2012
In reply to The Shelf Puffin: A pair of scarpa omegas aren't that expensive and climbs really well. I know what I would take.

My toes were absolutely freezing even at 5000m in Tien Shan. It wasn't that cold but I was horribly dehydrated, had been on the move for 20 hours straight, it was in the middle of the night and my lunch and dinner had consisted of a pulsin bar. Make sure you plan for contingencies is my advice.
shantaram - on 22 May 2012
In reply to The Shelf Puffin: I'd say Nepal Evos and Yeti gaiters is marginal for Himalayan peaks of around 6500m. You're likely to experience temperatures down to -25C and you are much more susceptible to frostbite at these high altitudes due to the reduced oxygen levels combined with the cold. Scarpa Vegas are a reasonably priced high altitude double boot. How much are your toes worth?
Damo on 22 May 2012
In reply to Damo:

And to add, Yeti gaiters give bugger-all added warmth. They lack insulation all over, but particularly under the sole where a lot of heat escapes. They might stop the Nepals getting wet from snow on the outside though.
jon59 - on 22 May 2012
In reply to The Shelf Puffin: I've used both Nepal evo boots and scarpa Vegas at altitude in some very cold conditions.

The plus side for Vegas is you can put the inners in you sleeping bag at night to keep them warm and they don't take up much room, down side is they hurt like hell to walk in and they are heavy and they made my feet sweat.

I used Nepal evo boots with yeti gaiters at altitude recently and I had no issues with cold feet. I did however have a set of custom made insoles made so to spread my full weight across my whole foot and not cause cold spots. I also used a good sock combination with well fitting boots, changing my socks for a brand new pair for summit day. The only real down side that I found was I had trouble keeping them dry and they were a pain to put in my bag at night to keep warm.

If you want to use your Nepal evos why not try them with 40below neoprene gaiters if you are worried about cold feet.
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The Shelf Puffin - on 23 May 2012
In reply to The Shelf Puffin:

thanks to all, plenty to think about, probably off to e bay to find some unloved doubles or similar. Ps Size 44 if anyone has anything of interest.


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