/ Cleaning your road bike?

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RCJ - on 08 Jun 2012
Hey guys/gals

What process do you follow for cleaning your road bikes?

Mine needs a good scrub and never done it before...

Thought i'd give it a clean tomorrow, so a couple of tips might help ;)

rob
Rigid Raider - on 09 Jun 2012
In reply to RCJ:

Wash the frame down with car shampoo and an old soft-bristled floor brush ( the sort that comes with a dustpan).

Clean the rims gently with a wet scouring pad. Clean the brake blocks and pick out any embedded grit.

Remove the chain, soak and agitate in several changes of paraffin to clean. Dry with an old rag then use the same rag to clean the black muck off chainrings and from between the cogs with a sawing motion, the wheel lying flat on your lap. Allow the chain to dry overnight then re-lube lightly with a solvent based wax lube.

Sorted.
JLS on 09 Jun 2012
In reply to RCJ:

Using a cloth and a bucket of warm water with some fairy liquid in it, followed by re oiling, does most people.

When I was a kid, if I'd gone out in the rain, I used to strip it right down, practical taking apart every component to allow each nut and bolt to be cleaned individually. The process certainly removed all the nasty grit and gunk but at 4 hours was some what time consuming...
In reply to Rigid Raider:

> Clean the rims gently with a wet scouring pad. Clean the brake blocks and pick out any embedded grit.

I see the bit about the pads, but why should I be scouring my rims? Does it make the brakes work better?
Hardonicus - on 09 Jun 2012
In reply to TobyA: A scouring pad is not going to remove any metal from your rims, however it will aid removing muck and grease embedded in all the little scratches.
JLS on 09 Jun 2012
In reply to TobyA:

I'd have thought the idea was to remove any tiny loose flakes of aluminium before they embed themselves in the blocks.
vark - on 09 Jun 2012
In reply to RCJ:
Babywipes
victorclimber - on 09 Jun 2012
In reply to RCJ: i use a foam chain cleaner you can buy with an old tooth brush to agitate works great ..
FrankBooth - on 09 Jun 2012
In reply to RCJ:
Every now and again I treat my bike to a weekend at the local spa where trained experts massage it's weary framework and pamper it with green tea extract and aloe vera.
woolsack - on 09 Jun 2012
In reply to RCJ: I borrowed an ultrasonic cleaner from work this weekend and what a great bit of kit. Put in grimy chain, 5 minutes later take out brand new one! It is running at 50 degrees celcius. Ive lobbed some old deralleurs and a crank set in there as well as some carburettors from my truck.
On the hunt for more stuff now that needs cleaning!
Anonymous on 09 Jun 2012 - cpc2-live10-0-0-cust425.know.cable.virginmedia.com
In reply to RCJ:

Is this question a joke and am I missing something?

If it is serious then for me a pressure washer works well. Just re-oil the chain and gears afterwards. Simple really.
andy - on 09 Jun 2012
In reply to Anonymous:
> (In reply to RCJ)
>
> Is this question a joke and am I missing something?
>
> If it is serious then for me a pressure washer works well. Just re-oil the chain and gears afterwards. Simple really.

Clearly not that simple a question as a pressure washer will bugger your bearings in no time at all. And you'll need to do more than splash water on it if you want to get your chain clean.

So yes, I guess you are missing something.
Anonymous on 09 Jun 2012 - cpc2-live10-0-0-cust425.know.cable.virginmedia.com
In reply to andy:
> (In reply to Anonymous)
> [...]
>
> Clearly not that simple a question as a pressure washer will bugger your bearings in no time at all. And you'll need to do more than splash water on it if you want to get your chain clean.
>
> So yes, I guess you are missing something.

Only if you use it on high pressure, depends which attachment you have and how you direct it. To be honest I've used a pressure washer on my road, mountain and touring bikes for years and have never buggered or rusted anything up.

a 10 - 15 minute job including getting the washer out of the shed connected to the hose and put back is all that is needed.
andy - on 09 Jun 2012
In reply to Anonymous: So you simply squirt water on it from a hosepipe and then "oil the gears"? Really?
Anonymous on 09 Jun 2012 - cpc2-live10-0-0-cust425.know.cable.virginmedia.com
In reply to andy:
> (In reply to Anonymous) So you simply squirt water on it from a hosepipe and then "oil the gears"? Really?

No - the main bits being pressure washer, attachments and how you direct the water. - Mo mention of a hose pipe though it could work. Its all about directed water at the right pressure really.

The pressure and attachments and re oil etc does for 99% of the cleaning. Sometimes I might throw in a brush/rag/something to pick out the dirt from the chain, gears etc but thats only if its needed.
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RCJ - on 10 Jun 2012
In reply to RCJ:

Thanks for the replies,

Spent a good 2hours cleaning my bike today, aiming to get back on her tomorrow.

As for the poster who thought it was a joke... No it was genuinely. I know how to clean my mountain bike. Simple stuff.... But with aims to ride my road bike for 40+ miles and at speeds averaging 20mph... Last thing I want is something to go wrong... So thought I'd checkif there was something specific I should do... Sorry if I wasted your time...

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