/ Lightweight abseil rope question

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Roberttaylor - on 14 Jun 2012
I'm looking for 45m of the lightest possible rope that I can abseil with. My belay device is a Petzl reverso 3.

Q1. Can I abseil, using gloves, on 7mm cord?
Q2. What would you use, for the abseils on for example the Cuillin ridge (if you intended to avoid or solo the climbs)

Any other info or hints much appreciated.

Robert
highclimber - on 14 Jun 2012
In reply to Roberttaylor: a single strand of 7mm on abseil would be terrifying. even double wouldn't be too much fun especially if they're wet.
jimtitt - on 14 Jun 2012
In reply to Roberttaylor:

You donīt save much weight by using 7mm cord (Mammut for example is 33g/m) compared with something like a Tendon Master 7.8 half/twin rope (38g/m) and the half rope is considerably more useful for other things!
Roberttaylor - on 14 Jun 2012
In reply to jimtitt: Good option but expensive. I've already got 60m doubles but want somethign 45m-ish.

Probably need to accept that I will have to spend some money.

R
drsdave - on 14 Jun 2012
In reply to Roberttaylor:
> I'm looking for 45m of the lightest possible rope that I can abseil with. My belay device is a Petzl reverso 3.
>
> Q1. Can I abseil, using gloves, on 7mm cord?
> Q2. What would you use, for the abseils on for example the Cuillin ridge (if you intended to avoid or solo the climbs)
>
> Any other info or hints much appreciated.
>
> Robert

Cuillins I'd advise nothing less than 50m. Mammut do a real techy lightweight single rope of 8.1mm. I got one due to its light weight property and single use if needed. 50m will give you 25m of doubled abseil or a one off 50m plunge. good luck and hold tight.
d

augustus trout - on 14 Jun 2012
In reply to Roberttaylor: I have no practical experience at all but I have spoken to others who have taken 60m of 6mm when soloing in the alps for emergency, but I think emergency was the crucial part of the conversation. It is possible to rig a rope simply with a knot and a krab so you can use a tag or haul line that's significantly thinner to pull it down. so the set up should be lighter than a doubled dynamic rope the description is in http://www.ukclimbing.com/articles/page.php?id=167
climber david - on 14 Jun 2012
In reply to Roberttaylor:

someone more experianced my come along and say otherwise but could you not use a monster munter (www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ulTTrhfCvs)

You may want to try it in controlled conditions first
Roberttaylor - on 15 Jun 2012
In reply to Roberttaylor: Needless to say, any system will be tested before use in anger.
Roberttaylor - on 15 Jun 2012
In reply to Roberttaylor: Is there any reason why (other than the higher risk of shock loading it) abseiling off 8mm accessory cord should be more difficult/dangerous than using an 8mm rope?

The two examples are:

This rope, at 2.2kg and Ģ98 for 50m http://www.ropelocker.co.uk/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=127

This cord, at 2.0kg and Ģ68.50 for 50m http://www.gooutdoors.co.uk/mammut-8mm-cord-p181339

Though the rope would be more versatile.

R
wilkie14c - on 15 Jun 2012
In reply to Roberttaylor:
Abseiling is the most dangerous thing as climbers do so don't f**k about here. For the Cuillin ridge we used a 40m Mammut serenity <mentioned above> and it was perfect. No abbs are longer than 20 on the usual south to north route. It worked for us as one carried the rope and the other carried the harnesses and bits of gear so we were both evenly weighted. If we did it again we'd prob take a 20m half each joining them as nessesary. We wouldn't need the rope for climbing as we soloed everything. The lightest, safest option for a solo climber on the ridge as yourself would be in my opinion a 40m skinny half. I really don't think you are going to gain very much by taking say a 20m skinny half and pull cord. It'll take time to set each abb up and it'll be like an elastic band! Just my 2p worth.
Roberttaylor - on 16 Jun 2012
In reply to blanchie14c: Cheers. I'm sure I can find cheap skinny half rope somewhere.

R
wilkie14c - on 16 Jun 2012
In reply to Roberttaylor:
The mammut 8mm phoenix is a great rope, I've been using a pair for a couple of years now. Not as stretchy as the beal ice lines
jas wood - on 16 Jun 2012
Erstwhile on 16 Jun 2012
In reply to Roberttaylor:
I have a 50 m twin rope that works well for this kind of thing. I use it doubled on glaciers or moving together. No problems abseiling - friction plate works fine.
Exile - on 16 Jun 2012
In reply to Roberttaylor:

Last time we did the Cullin Ridge we used a 7.5mm twin rope. I used the old small reverso which was designed for thin ropes with it.

Frankly though if you're fit enough to do the ridge then the extra weight of an 8.1mm rope over 7mm cord won't make the difference between success and failure.
Roberttaylor - on 25 Jun 2012
In reply to Roberttaylor: Cheers to the previous two posts in particular, I think I will get 50m of twin rope at some point.
edinburgh_man on 25 Jun 2012
In reply to Roberttaylor:

Why get a twin rope? Surely light double ropes would be better? Then you can at least use them for trad routes. Edelrid do the Apus which is 7.8mm and 40g per metre.

You can safely if your careful abseil on 6mm static cord (as per Ueli).
See here:
http://davesearle.me/2012/06/21/forbes-arete-aiguille-du-chardonnet/#more-639
Baron Weasel - on 26 Jun 2012
In reply to Roberttaylor: Spelenium Unicore 8.5 is probably the Worlds thinnest 'trustworthy' ab rope, take a breaking biner though - it sure is quick!

http://bealplanet.com/sport/anglais/unicore.php

The Baron
Baron Weasel - on 26 Jun 2012
In reply to Ross Mathers: Bear in mind that Ueli was using kevlar rope, not ordinary static.

You could use dyneema rope too http://www.foxsonline.com/acatalog/Liros-Dyneema-Rope-01500.html

But probably best just to man up, do a bit more training so you can carry a proper bit of PPE!?!

The Baron
edinburgh_man on 26 Jun 2012
In reply to Baron Weasel:

Yes, Dave mentions (in the link) that the 6mm cord he is using is also Kevlar.

Personally I'd prefer a half rope.

Cheers
NottsRich on 26 Jun 2012
In reply to Roberttaylor: I did a very short abseil (4 or 5m)on 2 strands of 7mm accessory cord last week. It was dry, using a Reverso 3, with the cord tucked back through the karabiner for a little extra friction. I didn't have a bag on, and felt it was easily controllable. I wouldn't rate my chances of slowing down once I was going too fast though. No comment for a single strand of 7mm though.
jkarran - on 26 Jun 2012
In reply to Roberttaylor:

What route/task do you actually want it for?

Yes you can abseil on 7mm cord (or less with less margin for error) but you'll have to take appropriate precautions to ensure you have adequate control and the rope is protected from edges and overload.

If you're thinking about getting 45m of cord 7mm which is basically useless for all but this one job whatever that may be I'd suggest you splash a bit more money on 50m of nice light halfrope which will do you good service for years to come.

jk
Ben Briggs - on 26 Jun 2012
In reply to Ross Mathers: A bit dodgy but i often use 5mm cord for rapping on when skiing, a few others round cham do the same. Im not worried about the strength but would never use it near any sharp rock!
mountainpenguin on 26 Jun 2012
In reply to Roberttaylor:
Lok at the alpine caving book. They use a single rope attached to 3mm cord for retrieval.
i.e. abb on a full single and pull down with a nice thin one
ScraggyGoat on 26 Jun 2012
In reply to Roberttaylor:
Take a half rope, chopped to 40m if you want to save a bit of weight. It won't be the little additional weight that will stop you completing the cullin ridge, particulalry if you have ditched the half dozen or so bits of gear that constitutes the normal rack.

Remember it was completed (in summer) for decades with 9 - 11mm ropes and big boots as standard; before the outdoor industry promoted it as a light weight only game.

Furthermore if you intend to avoid, or solo some of the climbs you can take the same approach to some of the abseils. Plus if its a good weather w/e you'll probably be able to beg to abseil off somebody elses rope on the Inn Pin and TD gap (or go round). Which only leaves two descents in the central section which you may like a rope for (Bidean and one a bit after), or research the alternatives for.
Baron Weasel - on 26 Jun 2012
In reply to Roberttaylor: These are good for extra friction with very thin ropes - I have used them for caving: http://www.inglesport.com/shop/product/1194/Descenders/Raumer-Handy/

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