/ 750 ish road bike??

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Dave McKechnie - on 03 Jul 2012
Afternoon all,

Currently got a hardtail MTB but looking to branch out into the world of road biking - the meain reason is I'm doing the biking leg of a triathlon in a few weeks so seemed like the right thing to do.

I appreciate that 750 is the lower end of the road bike market but does anyone have any recommendations?

The current favourite is the Wilier Montegrappa Sora 9

http://www.airevalleycycles.com/m1b0s6p6375/WILIER-Montegrappa-Sora-9-speed-2012

I could be tempted to spend a bit more but certainly not more than about 900.

What do you think??
ablackett - on 03 Jul 2012
In reply to Dave McKechnie: I'm no expert, but the prices on decathlon look great - eg.

http://www.decathlon.co.uk/btwin-facet-5-id_8127609.html

or they have a Aluminium frame with carbon forks for about 300.
carlo - on 03 Jul 2012
In reply to Dave McKechnie: Depends on what you want to do. Have a look @ FELT, I've just bought the Z6 which is much friendlier to someone with my back/age than the F6 which is more of an out @ out racer. I'm an ex racer so have some idea. Carbon fibre monocoque frame with decent spec for 1020.

Road is so much better - enjoy whatever you get.
Hat Dude on 03 Jul 2012
In reply to Dave McKechnie:

This looks a pretty good bargain, if it's the right size.

http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/Models.aspx?ModelID=84317

Hat Dude on 03 Jul 2012
In reply to Hat Dude:

Should've added better groupset & fairly decent wheels
carlo - on 03 Jul 2012
In reply to Dave McKechnie: If you ever want to upgrade then preferences should be with friction areas such as wheels, tyres, wheel hubs, BB etc where the quality will really be noticed.
kevin stephens - on 03 Jul 2012
In reply to Dave McKechnie: My first bike had Sora, the bottom bracket fell to bits. Sora seems to be aimed at recreational rather than fitness/sporting cyclists. I would go for Tiaga minimum, compromise on frame if needs be to match your budget
Dave McKechnie - on 03 Jul 2012
In reply to Dave McKechnie:

Excuse my ignorance but what is 'Sora' anyway???
Dave McKechnie - on 03 Jul 2012
In reply to Dave McKechnie:

Ignore my previous comment, just worked it out.

What about this one?

http://www.airevalleycycles.com/m1b0s6p6143/KUOTA-Korsa-Apex-2012
Dave Todd - on 03 Jul 2012
In reply to Dave McKechnie:

How about Canyon Roadlite 6.0...?

http://www.canyon.com/_uk/roadbikes/bike.html?b=2502

Alu frame, carbon forks, full 105 groupset, Mavic Aksium wheels, Continental GP 4000s tyres. Don't think you'll find a better spec at the price (currently 819 - but varies slightly as vs Euro rate changes).

Downside = main order only...
Phil79 - on 03 Jul 2012
In reply to Dave McKechnie:
I brought myself a Specilized Allez a few years ago. Sora groupset, alu frame and carbon forks. Good all round road bike for a decent price (just over 500 at the time) if your a 1st time road rider. The wheels are pretty crap, and the bearings are a mess after two winters of commuting in the wet, despite regular regreasing. The sora groupset has held up fairly well so far but the brakes/shifters are starting to fell a little woolley.

The one thing I didn't think about was ability to fit proper mudguards, the frame doesn't have bosses. I've got a set of plastic clip on mudguards (Road racers) which are ok, but if I was looking now would get something with proper bosses. The mudguards have stayed on all year so far and IMO are invaluable if you ride in the UK. Having a wet ass for 2-3 hours during a ride is no fun!

I'd probably go for one of these if I was buying again now. Traditional geometry but a solid bike built for UK conditions.

http://www.ribblecycles.co.uk/bikebuilder.asp?action=showframes&sub=conf_BBRW&type=RIBMO
Dave Todd - on 03 Jul 2012
In reply to Dave Todd:
>
> Downside = main order only...

I did (of course) mean 'mail order only'...
Dave Todd - on 03 Jul 2012
In reply to Dave McKechnie:

If your budget is heading into that terrain (999) then you could do worse than look at Planet-X

http://www.planet-x-bikes.co.uk/i/q/FBPXPRORIV12/planet_x_pro_carbon_rival_road_bike_2012

999 for full carbon frame and forks, SRAM Rival / SRAM Apex etc. Plus (since you're West Yorkshire based) you could drop in and check out the kit before you buy.
rmt - on 03 Jul 2012
In reply to Dave McKechnie:
Or go second hand. At that price you could get a really nice second hand road bike in mint condition.
Mr Moac on 03 Jul 2012
In reply to Dave McKechnie:

Don't get Sora. I had them on my first road bike they are cr-p, 105 at least. Go on Ribble and play about on bike builder you can get a lot of bike, alloy or carbon for under 1000. Check out the Sportive Bianco

Lord of Starkness - on 04 Jul 2012
In reply to Phil79:

The Ribble Audax is certainly the most popular 'winter' bike amongst club riders in the North West.
Tiberius - on 04 Jul 2012
In reply to Lord of Starkness:
> The Ribble Audax is certainly the most popular 'winter' bike amongst club riders in the North West.

I'd look at this at the 600 level, or the PlanetX suggestion above if you wanted to stretch to 1Kish

2nd hand is tricky, just take a look on ebay, they go for a very good price and bikes do not last forever. By the time you've replaced tyres and had it serviced you've paid more than you can get it new.

I've seldom seen a road bike on ebay go for a price I'd consider a bargain. Touring bikes perhaps, but not a dedicated modern road bike.
Dave McKechnie - on 04 Jul 2012
In reply to Dave McKechnie:

So many suggestions and I'm still not much clearer as to what to go for!!

Is the general consenus that Ribble and Planet X bikes are worth serious consideration rather than going for the two I posted earlier, i.e. Wilier or Kuota??
Escher - on 04 Jul 2012
In reply to Dave McKechnie: If you are willing to stump up some extra cash and want a carbon frame (and are happy to go for mail order) then Ribble and Planet X are really good. I have a Ribble New Sportive and it is a really excellent bike, especially with decent wheels. If wanting Shimano I would spec 105 minimum which pushes the price up even more. However if you are trying to keep the price more to what you originally said, that Canyon linked to above is outstanding value with brilliant finishing kit and they make very good bikes indeed. They have a UK rep who is apparently very helpful and they do a 30 day money back guarantee (if only ridden on dry roads - could be difficult this summer!) if you don't like it. I'm lusting after a carbon Canyon myself and their reviews are consistently very, very good and the value of their bikes is amongst the best. Their alu frames are supposed to be brilliant.

If you do go for mail order, you get a lot more for your money, but don't have the local support of a LBS. But do obsess about sizing as it is very important to get that right.
Tiberius - on 04 Jul 2012
In reply to Dave McKechnie:
> So many suggestions and I'm still not much clearer as to what to go for!!

tbh, there aren't as many suggestions as you think. Most of the frames will be the same, especially if you do go for carbon. The groupsets will be shimano sora or 105, or the equivalent from Campag or SRAM, and there are half a dozen different wheels you might get.

Then it's just a combination of those plus a different paint job depending on the manufacturer you choose.
Voltemands - on 04 Jul 2012
In reply to Dave McKechnie: Trek 1.5.
Tom Hutton - on 04 Jul 2012
In reply to Dave McKechnie: Don't have time to read all of this but I am loving my Forme Longcliffe - and it's British...
ripper - on 04 Jul 2012
In reply to Dave McKechnie: It's down to personal taste as much as anything imho - if you buy a bike that you like the look/image/feel of, you'l ride it more... I would say though that if you can find something that attracts you, in your price range, with Tiagra/105 (or SRAM), the shifters are much nicer. I bought down to a budget like you and ended with a Focus Summit with full Sora group. It works fine and I like it but the shifters feel a bit cheap n nasty and I can't help wishing I'd spent just a little bit more. Guess that's always the case though...
Alun - on 04 Jul 2012
In reply to Dave McKechnie:
I recently bought a new Boardman Road Comp http://www.boardmanbikes.com/road/road_comp.html for around 600 notes, and I couldn't be happier with it. I'm more of a mountain biker than a roadie so only go out once or twice a month on it. Did a couple of 100+km rides this spring including some 'proper' (i.e. 1000+m ascent) climbs. Never any problems.

The biggest downside to it is the wheels which are heavy 32 spoke Mavics. The SRAM Apex stuff works flawlessly. The frame seems good enough to hold on for a while so I find myself taking it up more seriously I'll probably try to find a decent wheelset for around 200-250.

I'm abroad so had to buy it from Wiggle, but they sell them in Halfords.
jockster - on 04 Jul 2012
In reply to Dave McKechnie:
(sorry - bit of a thread hijack)

Interested in the Ribble 7005 Audax / Winter Training as a year round commuting bike.
http://www.ribblecycles.co.uk/specialedition.asp?action=GenerateConstructor&part=SERIBB7005WINTE...

What (if any) component upgrades would people recommend

Cheers, Simon
telemarker - on 04 Jul 2012
In reply to Dave McKechnie:

I second boardman, i got mine maybe 2 years ago now on the cycle to work scheme. I think mine is the "team comp" (alloy frame, carbon forks with SRAM rival). Retailed at about 800. Its worked flawlessly and the only thing I plan on changing is the wheels once I get some money together.
Lord of Starkness - on 05 Jul 2012
In reply to jockster:

As you're not in the flatlands, I'd go for a better range of gearing.

It's not just a Campag thing, but I'd go for the Campag Groupset with the compact (34 - 50) chainset, the 13 - 29 cassette and the medium cage on the rear mech. You'll ride up anything on that and it only costs 40 more for a 10 speed. I've got that combination on my Gran Fondo - done about 5000 miles on it, and only just thinking about replacing chain and cassette. The old adage still runs true - campag Wears In - Shimano wears out - particularly with the lower end groupsets.

To get a similar gear range in Shimano means upgrading to the 105 groupset - which is similar quality to the Campag Veloce, but will add another 150 to the cost!
Dave McKechnie - on 05 Jul 2012
In reply to Lord of Starkness:

Thanks for that. I have no idea what you're talking about but it all sounds like good advice considering I live in Queensbury - possibly one of the hilliest parts of W Yorks!!
Steve John B - on 05 Jul 2012
In reply to Dave McKechnie: Planet X do a version of their 999 bike with wider range of gears for hills and stuff (that's as technical as I get):

http://www.planet-x-bikes.co.uk/i/q/CBPXSLPGRFN/planet_x_pro_carbon_gran_fondo_road_bike
Steve John B - on 05 Jul 2012
In reply to Steve John B: ...uses SRAM which is an alternative to Campag and Shimano
Lord of Starkness - on 05 Jul 2012
In reply to Steve John B:
> (In reply to Steve John B) ...uses SRAM which is an alternative to Campag and Shimano

Good kit with excellent wide range cassettes and rear mechs - though at entry level even the Apex range is a lot more expensive than IMHO similar quality Campag Veloce groupset.

Lord of Starkness - on 05 Jul 2012
In reply to Steve John B:

That gearing option wasn't available from P-X 2 years ago which is why I bought the Ribble Gran Fondo / Campag Veloce.
Mr Moac on 06 Jul 2012
In reply to Lord of Starkness:

Just a question about the Ribble Gran Fondo. I got one a few weeks ago, have had rain water entering the frame via the seat post/tube have you had this? If so how did you stop it other than with a bit of inner tube,that doesn't look good. On a steel frame I drilled the B.B,don't want to do that with carbon.
Tiberius - on 06 Jul 2012
In reply to Mr Moac:
> ...If so how did you stop it

Use your winter bike when it's wet :)

Sorry, not the answer you probably wanted, but keen club cyclists will almost always have at least 2 bikes and use the 'winter' bike when the weather is gash.
Lord of Starkness - on 06 Jul 2012
In reply to Mr Moac:

I've encountered this after being caught in a heavy downpour (and riding our club's open 25 last July when it p'd down from start to finish).

I actually think the ingress of water is via a couple of small holes in the ends of the chainstays that are needed to allow gases to escape during the manufacturing process.

My solution was to take the seat post out, and leave the bike upside down for a couple of hours.

That ride had been so wet that I also had to remove the tyres and tubes to allow the wheels to dry out -- water was getting in via the spoke nipple holes and via the valve seating!

PS when the weather is really minging I generally stay at home - or use my winter bike!
Mr Moac on 07 Jul 2012
In reply to Lord of Starkness:
Thanks for the info, found the two small holes sealed them with hot wax,melted black crayon. Had already dried it out that way, there is a drain hole under the B.B.It must not drain the stays and seat tube.

To Tiberius.
I have a winter bike but got caught out in a torrential thunder storm while trying the new bike out.It was a very wet spin cycle Ha Ha.

Thank you both for your replies
north country boy - on 07 Jul 2012
In reply to Dave McKechnie: Definitely another shout for Planet X, well worth visiting their showroom in Rotherham and getting advice from their staff, they won't feed you spiel and will tell you straight what you are best looking at. You'll find it hard to beat them on price for anything of similar spec elsewhere, especially against the big names such as Specialized etc...

Bought a RT57 in Dec and love it, fits what I want it for perfectly and at an amazing price for the spec.

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