/ Goggles for winter climbing..?

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frqnt - on 10 Aug 2012
I'm buying goggles for a one week trip to Scotland and a two week trip to Norway mixed/ice climbing.

I'll no doubt use these afterwards for climbing in Canada/NZ and maybe a spot of snowboarding here and there.

I'm looking at getting Adidas Yodai, and as the primary reason for purchase is the forthcoming climbing trips, I'm wondering what category lens I should purchase these with (Cat. 2/Cat. 3)?

Any suggestions? Or arguments against said Adidas goggles?

Thanks
Milesy - on 10 Aug 2012
In reply to frqnt:
> I'm looking at getting Adidas Yodai, and as the primary reason for purchase is the forthcoming climbing trips, I'm wondering what category lens I should purchase these with (Cat. 2/Cat. 3)?

If you are using goggles while scottish winter climbing it is probably likely there will not be much sunshine about. Couldn't say about Norway. I don't bother wearing goggles. I find them cumbersome and distracting from what is going on about me.
In reply to frqnt: For Scotland and Norway I'd just get clear ones. I've only needed them rarely in Scotland and never in Norway whilst ice climbing, although I have worn mine a few times whilst ski touring in the same area (Lyngen). If the sun is out I just use decent sunglasses. Goggles only come out in blizzards. I'd go for something cheap and light, they'll spend most of their time in your bag I imagine.
cyberpunk - on 10 Aug 2012
In reply to frqnt: I would get a pair of clear cheap ones. Brightness is not an issue as prvious poster said. Think of Them like a first aid kit. Very rarely used but very useful when needed.
Richard Carter - on 10 Aug 2012
In reply to cyberpunk:

+1


I have a pair for such things, got them in TK Maxx very cheaply
Kevin Woods - on 10 Aug 2012
In reply to frqnt: Agree with all the comments about rarely useful but very useful when needed. Milsey, I don't agree! I've had a few times when goggles remained the only reason I could still see.

Imo. only useful for blizzards and spindrift. Which may be likely on a one week trip to Scotland in winter...
Andy Mountains - on 10 Aug 2012
In reply to frqnt:

Agree with other comments. Get cheap goggles, they will stay in the bottom of your sack apart from in the most severe of conditions.
Think I've got mine out twice maybe three times in 40-50 days winter climbing.
Milesy - on 10 Aug 2012
In reply to Andy Mountains:

I quite like when my eye brows and eye lashes ice up in spindrift and blizards :) I use a powder face mask which stops the rest of my face stinging and my eyes dont bother me as I am normally looking down at a compass or soemthing anyway.
BruceM - on 10 Aug 2012
In reply to frqnt:
Go to Tkmaxx and get a budget pair that fit your face nose etc. Fit is better than brand. And get light coloured ones for Scotland. Goggles now mean we can carry on in Scotland (or at least get back safely) when the sh** hits the fan -- which is most weekends in winter :)
Theeni - on 10 Aug 2012
In reply to BruceM:

I'd advise against going too cheap because you want them to work in the worst of conditions but I agree you are unlikely to use them in Norway but I have climbed I. Scotland for quite a proportion of my short winter climbing career
Milesy - on 10 Aug 2012
Some tinted goggles also obscure contour lines on OS maps as well.
Kai - on 10 Aug 2012
In reply to frqnt:

The best climbing goggles I've used are the Uvex Pocket Goggles.

http://www.heavyglare.com/uvex-goggles_pocket.html

They are light, compact, and they fold up, which means that they take up very little space in your pack. Work great for climbing in heavy spindrift, etc.
Taurig - on 10 Aug 2012
In reply to frqnt:

I've got several pairs of goggles for mountain biking, and whilst you don't need to spend mega bucks, IMO it's worth spending enough to get a few features. I'd recommend double layered lenses with an anti-fog coating to combat misting up. Single layered lenses or ones without anti-fog are pretty hopeless, and what's the point in carrying goggles to help you see if they fog up after 30 seconds?

I went for a yellow tint with mine although as said above, clear is fine also. I just find yellow cuts out glare but somehow makes everything cheerier at the same time. :)
Hannes on 11 Aug 2012
In reply to Taurig:
> yellow cuts out glare but somehow makes everything cheerier at the same time. :)

Not to be underestimated, they somehow make me happier
andyd1970 - on 11 Aug 2012
In reply to frqnt: Clear ones are fine and cheap as poss as long as they fit wearing your helmet!!!1
iksander on 15 Aug 2012
In reply to frqnt: Get a petzl helmet and a vizion visor. Superior to goggles for climbing in every respect. It will protect your face as well as your eyes; never ever steams up, feel claustrophobic, can't loose them, brilliant for spindrift and yes it works in updrafts too. It just works. Yes 40 is expensive for a piece of plastic and some hinges, but absolutely worth it.

Uvex pocket are a close second, but still steam up (usually when I'm poohing myself and snorting) and restrict your vision somewhat.
ads.ukclimbing.com
seanjc - on 15 Aug 2012
In reply to frqnt: Adidas Yodai are amazing! I love them to pieces for skiing but I've never once got them out of my bag in Scotland or the Alps. They don't really fit very well under my climbing helmet either if I remember rightly

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