/ Scottish Central Belt Aid!

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Fultonius - on 20 Aug 2012
Some mates and I are thinking of hitting Yosemite next year.

We can't aid.

Any suggestions of good routes to learn the craft?

I'm thinking Dumby - Big Zipper with bolt ladder start, Chemin, not sure if Requiem is Aidable to the top??

Cambusbarron close - plenty.

Any other thoughts?


In reply to Fultonius: I remember learning to aid on doing longbow and windjammer on a cold day when no one else was about. You know how to place gear already, so doing something with lots of obvious easy placements makes gear - what you are really trying to learn is how to move efficienty with whatever etrier/daisy chain combo you are using.
jonnie3430 - on 20 Aug 2012
In reply to Fultonius:

If you want an adventure I'm sure the north face of Dunglas will give a few lines.

Are you thinking of full on aid routes or just being able to climb aid sections faster?
Fultonius - on 20 Aug 2012
In reply to jonnie3430: Mainly just to learn how to "Aid Faster". Doubt we'll be trying full-on A4 lines or whatever!

In fact, I doubt we'll ever do anything more than A2. I'd rather climb 5.11 A0 that 5.10 A2...
Lamb - on 20 Aug 2012
In reply to Fultonius: There is an aid route on Mt. Loudoun over the big roof on the East buttress
Wicamoi on 20 Aug 2012
In reply to Fultonius:

It's short of course, and not exactly Central Belt, but Left Hand Crack at Polney might do for dihedral practise.
JLS on 20 Aug 2012
In reply to Fultonius:

There are some very big bridge towers in a field near Stonehouse that would benifit from a braver man than me aid climbing in order install my "top rope".
jonnie3430 - on 20 Aug 2012
In reply to Fultonius:

If what you mean is an A0 or A1 pitch on an otherwise climbing route I've always found them well protected (bolts or pegs,) and you can yard up them by pulling on extendable runners (good for a grip and you can extend them if you need a foothold,) until you get to the climbing again. Not that I've been on a climbing trip to Yosemite.
Fultonius - on 20 Aug 2012
In reply to jonnie3430: Well, basically aiming to do The Nose, and some other routes on the way to it!

"Apparently" it can be climbed at 5.10 (HVS/E1?) plus quite a lot of A2, or, at 5.11 (so E3ish?) and A0. but, I think being proficient at A2 would be a good base level before getting out there....
Enty - on 20 Aug 2012
In reply to Fultonius:

Chris Macnamara's aid tutorials on Youtube are great for the basics.

E
Fultonius - on 21 Aug 2012
In reply to Lamb:
> (In reply to Fultonius) There is an aid route on Mt. Loudoun over the big roof on the East buttress

Had a look at that one last night - the guide describes it as 25m but it's only about 7m high?!?!

In the end I led Lunge just before it pissed down and then James led Pulpit Crack up to where it joins the Severe and set up a belay so I could jumar second it and then haul his ass up on a pulley! Not too hard with a 3:1 rig but I think I need to work on a system that uses less arm power!
simon_D - on 21 Aug 2012
In reply to Fultonius: Using a Gri Gri and a jumar with a screwgate and a 120 sling is a good set-up..
whispering nic - on 21 Aug 2012
In reply to simon_D: Dalachy quarry OS grid ref 863 202. Sandstone quarry with 16m roof. Old aid practice ground not far from Hawcraig.
Baron Weasel - on 21 Aug 2012
In reply to Fultonius: Speak to Pete Rhodes! He's done hard solo aid in Yosemite and at home. I'll send you a message with his email...

The Baron
Oli - on 21 Aug 2012
In reply to Fultonius:
Don't bother practicing! Well, some might help but it's not that hard.
Two mates and I turned up in the valley and decided to do the nose. One of us had had a few informal lessons and myself and my other friend went and aided up a single pitch of something with the Big Walls book and learnt quick enough.
I don't think there's anything harder than A1 on the nose and most of it's pretty simple. We fixed to Sickle and learnt a lot from that, then did it in 3 days. Just get on it, it'll be fine...
Oli - on 21 Aug 2012
In reply to Oli:
As someone else said, we quickly learnt that freeing stuff then just pulling on gear and trying to stay out of aiders as much as possible was the way forward.
Send me an email if you've got any more questions and want a punter's perspective

Fultonius - on 22 Aug 2012
In reply to Oli: I'm hoping that's what I'll be doing too, but, it would be nice to know how to aid properly - you never know, we might do a a proper aid route while we're out there.

We will also need to be well versed in hauling / jumaring etc....

And, finally, it gives us something to do on these damp, humid Scottish evenings!

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GrahamJ on 22 Aug 2012
In reply to Fultonius:

The McNamara videos are excellent, he also does a good download for reference.

A 10m crag just slightly off vertical with no major features to get your systems sorted.

Try somewhere like Benny Beg, easy for leading bolt to bolt and to get access to the top for rigging

You will phaff alot and until you work out the best method for leading, jugging, hauling, you will waste loads of energy in the process.

Try jugging over a bulge or lip, there is no fun in that, best fing out these things in relative safety. Overhanging is a different game altogether, no point in thinking about it until you have the basics wired but not really required for the routes you may have a go at on your trip.

Once you get past this, any decent continuous crack, again just off vertical, that swallows gear will do for clean aid. Once you start bouncing and hauling, you really appreciate what your gear/ropes can put up with.

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