/ Queuing on Alpine/Greater Range routes

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.
Blizzard - on 05 Oct 2012
Can someone please explain to me how the joys of mountaineering can be gained by trekking in a long queue up any mountain? Ive just seen the Manaslu picture, and imagined being one of those dots. OK, you might be surrounded with majestic vistas, but the romance of mountaineering ends at that point. Personally its not something I fully understand. Would any mountaineers care to cast their pennieth worth...
Damo on 05 Oct 2012
In reply to Blizzard:

They need to sacrifice solitude for 'success'.

Mountaineering has never been 'romantic' in the doing. Only in the reading.
radson - on 06 Oct 2012
In reply to Blizzard:

Within reason, I have often found it comforting to have other people around in some of the more precarious environments I have placed myself. That coupled with the fact that in some of the higher places, the walk/climb is so incredibly focused on the step or 2 in front of oneself that other people become non existant. For those of us not in the 1% of elite climbers who can tackle the remote high mountains unaided, this is what we do.

The infamous photo of Everest earlier this year and now Manaslu to me are not the norm. Everest 2012 had bad weather in which everyone was funnelled into a small summit window. Manaslu had to cope with the closure of Shish and Cho Oyu, funnelling more people to the 'easier' Nepalese post monsoon 8,000 m hill.

Those pictures are great fuel for people wishing to have a nice little sanctimonious rant about the aspirations of us ...let's say ....less imaginative climbers. That's cool with me. I will still keeping having fun walking the big hills and taking the odd picture or two and you guys can keep scratching your head and wondering why

CH - on 06 Oct 2012
In reply to Damo:

> Mountaineering has never been 'romantic' in the doing. Only in the reading.

Great line.
TOS on 06 Oct 2012 - 178.74.56.174 whois?
In reply to Blizzard:
> Can someone please explain to me how the joys of mountaineering can be gained by trekking in a long queue up any mountain?

I've never understood how waiting in a long queue at the bottom of a 150m winter route in an honeypot area such as coire an t-sneachda or Aonach Mor is 'ok' with the climbing community, yet a queue on one of the highest mountains in the world is 'disgusting' etc etc...
Avinash Aujayeb - on 06 Oct 2012
In reply to Blizzard:

On my exped this summer to the Karakorum, Spantik 7031m, our small team of 3 were alone on the mountain for most of the 21 days.

When I was left alone to acclimatise, whilst the others went to base camp, there was no one with me at a height of 5600m(I think) and I didn't see a soul for something like 30 hours.

That was awesome.

So, why do we want to climb Everest or whatever else? Choose another objective and it will be no lesser in terms of achievement or undertaking
Only a hill - on 06 Oct 2012
In reply to Damo:

> Mountaineering has never been 'romantic' in the doing. Only in the reading.

This can be the case, but I don't think it's necessarily true. Mountaineering can be romantic in 'real life', even in 2012.
ads.ukclimbing.com
Bruce Hooker - on 06 Oct 2012
In reply to radson:

> For those of us not in the 1% of elite climbers who can tackle the remote high mountains unaided, this is what we do.

Can't agree here, it's not a question of 1%, any competent climber in good health can go further afield if he or she wants to, it's just a question of being realistic about objectives. 8000 metre peaks are probably out but there are loads of smaller less crowded hills to climb. Just fit the peak to your reality, and that of your companions instead of using the ability of others, guides, "expedition" companies etc to do things that are beyond you.

Life is simple really :-)

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.