/ What is loweroff in French?

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sebrider - on 07 Oct 2012
As per title, I wondered what loweroff is in French...is it Un relais? This is a belay but is it also used for loweroff?
professionalwreckhead - on 07 Oct 2012
In reply to sebrider:

I believe it's "redescendre".

I found this years ago which has a lengthy english to french translation for most climbing terms.

http://www.rockclimbing.com/cgi-bin/forum/gforum.cgi?post=1880883

earlsdonwhu - on 07 Oct 2012
In reply to sebrider: That would be the verb to 'lower back' rather than the physical thing ie a chain.
jon on 07 Oct 2012
In reply to sebrider:

It's 'relais' with an adjective 'moulinette'.
sebrider - on 08 Oct 2012
In reply to jon: Thank you all :) Is moulinette also used for top-rope then?
jon on 08 Oct 2012
In reply to sebrider:

In France 99.99% of single pitch routes are equipped for lowering off. The concept of belaying at the top and walking off is lost on the French and therefore it's almost unnecessary to specify that the belay is equipped as a lower-off (with a karabiner/ring/maillon) as it's practically a given that it will be. Climbers will therefore usually refer to a belay/lower-off simply as 'le relais'. If you like, the term 'moulinette' is climber jargon for climbing in this way - what Brits refer to as sport climbing just to differentiate it from trad climbing. Moulinette can also be used to describe top roping http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moulinette_(escalade) though more than likely they'll say 'top-rope' as it's cool to use English...
Al Evans on 08 Oct 2012
In reply to sebrider: If you are going to fall off on dodgy gear in Spain a cry of 'Estoy a punto morir' might be useful.
Hardonicus - on 08 Oct 2012
In reply to sebrider: Just say loweroff. If they don't understand just shout it louder.
robal - on 08 Oct 2012
In reply to Hardonicus: I'm with this guy ^^^^

and if they still don't understand it after that, smash the place up, knowing that you tried!
french'yves - on 09 Oct 2012
Loweroff means "relai" if it is a noun
If it is a verb it means "redescendre" (think in english it can be used as a verb or a noun isn't it?)
Climbing in "moulinette" or installing a "moulinette" is toproping or installing a top rope ;-)
KiwiPrincess - on 09 Oct 2012
In reply to sebrider:
I only climbed a few days in France but what I heard was people yell "OK ..plue Baa" (which I imagine is spelt plus base?) Then they got lowered to the ground.
sebrider - on 09 Oct 2012
Tank you, most helpful. Cheers Seb
graeme jackson - on 09 Oct 2012
In reply to sebrider:

it's surrender. or it might be capitulate. I'm sure jeremy Clarkson will know

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