/ Sport climbing etiquette

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arnott70536 - on 09 Oct 2012
Hi

I am starting out rock climbing and think that sport climbing will be the best way to start and learn the basics before doing any trad climbing. My question is, is there any sport climbing etiquette I should adhere to when at a wall. For example should I let more experienced climbers have precedence over the route as I am only a beginner.

Any advice much appreciated
the sheep - on 09 Oct 2012
In reply to arnott70536:
Nope, you are at a wall and your money is worth the same as anyone else's. Enjoy the climbing and dont worry about being a beginner, everyone starts at some point.
arnott70536 - on 09 Oct 2012
In reply to the sheep:
I may just be confusing myself here but do you have to pay for outdoor bolted routes (which is what I meant by sport climbing at a wall) showing how much of a beginner I really am.
tlm - on 09 Oct 2012
In reply to arnott70536:

A wall is generally taken to be an indoor artificial climbing wall, which you do pay for.

Outdoors, you generally talk about a crag.

Where are you based? There may be a good club based near to you.

Also, no need to think that you have to start with sports climbing. Many people just start out on easier trad climbs if that is what they are interested in doing. What made you want to try climbing?
arnott70536 - on 09 Oct 2012
In reply to tlm: thanks for the heads up on the terminology. I'm based near Wakefield. I suppose it's a bit of the inner child in me just wanting to climb things and the natural progression from trees is to crags! I think climbing bolted crags would be a quicker way to get into climbing as I'm hoping ill be ok with a good rack of quick draws, without all the nuts and possibly cams (expense) I'd need for trad climbing
Ramblin dave - on 09 Oct 2012
In reply to arnott70536:
To be honest, once you've got a harness, helmet, rope, quickdraws and shoes, getting a set of nuts (about 60) and three cams (about 100 if you look out for special offers, and not strictly necessary anyway) isn't that much extra cost. And if you get into climbing outdoors by joining a club then you'll probably be able to borrow other peoples' stuff for a while anyway.

It's worth it, because the easy trad climbing in the UK is a whole world more fun and interesting and varied and spectacular than the easy sport climbing...
rockcat - on 11 Oct 2012
In reply to arnott70536: NO

> Hi
> I am starting out rock climbing and think that sport climbing will be the best way to start and learn the basics before doing any trad climbing. My question is, is there any sport climbing etiquette I should adhere to when at a wall. For example should I let more experienced climbers have precedence over the route as I am only a beginner.
>
> Any advice much appreciated

jkarran - on 11 Oct 2012
In reply to arnott70536:

Going with someone that already knows the ropes is your best bet.

For what it's worth as a beginner in Yorkshire you have access to precious little good easy sport but a wealth of good easy trad. The basics can be learned in minutes and if you're going with someone else you probably won't need any extra kit anyway.

jk
Nick Russell on 11 Oct 2012
In reply to arnott70536:

The only sport climbing "etiquette" I can think of is not top-roping through the fixed rings at the top: use your own draws if there's somebody else going up after you've led a route. Brushing off chalk "tick-marks" pointing to any hidden holds is another one: people generally want to find them themselves.

I'd second the advice to start trad as early as possible, as easy sport climbs in Britain are generally (not universally) fairly uninspiring, but you can find some brilliant easy trad routes. As suggested, finding a club or a more experienced climber who can show you how to be safe and lend you gear is the best way to go about this.
neuromancer - on 12 Oct 2012
In reply to arnott70536:

Why wouldn't you toprope through the rings?
derryclimbs - on 12 Oct 2012
In reply to neuromancer:
> (In reply to arnott70536)
>
> Why wouldn't you toprope through the rings?

is this a serious question? please tell me you're being sarcastic
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mcdougal - on 12 Oct 2012
In reply to neuromancer:

> Why wouldn't you toprope through the rings?

Constantly running the rope through the in-situ gear wears it out really quickly. As the routes are normally equipped at private expense it's best to use your own gear to lower from. The last climber can then strip the gear and lower from the rings.




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