/ best yoga poses and stances to build core strength

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Mountain Spirit - on 22 Nov 2012
Hi.

I want to climb more overhangs and roofs as they are what I need to improve on.

I have heard that for these core strength is important when climbing both of these.

I do yoga and have done some research into what poses increase core strength.

Which poses and stances are the best?

I have a few ones but not sure.

Upward Dog
Half Shoulder Stand
Plank
Warroir number 3
Boat
Certain variations of Sun Salutation

Bye

Savvas
Kaizen - on 22 Nov 2012
In reply to Mountain Spirit:
I have no real knowledge of yoga, so i cant comment on those exercises. However, i just thought id give my opinion. Remember the term core strength relates not just to the abs, its lower back also, dont neglect it, as it will cause imbalances if your targeting the abs all the time.

Roof climbing requires good footwork and technique, such as clamping a hold with both feet.

The core exercises i do is hanging leg raises (strict form without momentum), L sit pullups, which in turn will give your lats a good workout also. ab wheel roll-out is a fun exercise, if you dont have an ab wheel, they can be done using dumbbells if you have rounded ones.

Specific lower back exercises i do is either Barbell Deadlift, good morning. Or if you have limited equipment back extensions are very good also, can be done with bodyweight, or small weight plates or dumbbells:http://www.exrx.net/WeightExercises/ErectorSpinae/BWHyperextensionBall.html

Getting back to your original point with the yoga, the plank poses etc will work of course, but just maintaining a static pose, makes you strong in that particular position. So maybe doing core moves that require movement, IE, the back extensions and leg raises, that will sort of mimic the bending/twisting climbing involves.

And of course, to get better at roof's, climb roofs more often^^
seankenny - on 22 Nov 2012
In reply to Mountain Spirit:

Sawas!

Think upon this!!

The race is not to the swift, nor the battle to the strong, neither yet bread to the wise, nor yet riches to men of understanding, nor yet favor to men of skill; but time and chance happeneth to them all.

Train smarter, not harder.

How many ABOs have roofs? When you're bivied in slings, which is more important, the half shoulder stand or the full eaten pie?

If the grips hurt your hands, see first to the blisters.

Therin endeth the lesson. Go forth.
ripper - on 22 Nov 2012
In reply to seankenny: slightly more helpful than 'if thy weak core offend thee, cut it out' I suppose...
seankenny - on 22 Nov 2012
In reply to ripper:

From the strong came forth sweetness.
Nothing tastes sweeter than a hard route dispatched.
Listen, Sawas, learn, and apply this lesson.
Ciro - on 22 Nov 2012
In reply to Mountain Spirit:

You only need one - Savasana (or Corpse Pose). Practice it a lot, like 12 hrs a day. You'll be climbing 8b in no time and it's great fun too! :)
Bouldering Ben - on 22 Nov 2012
In reply to Mountain Spirit:

Savvas, You might not want to hear it but having seen some of your photos I think you could make massive progress on climbing overhangs and roofs by losing some weight. You won't have to be as strong if you have less weight to hold up!

Maybe combine some cardio sessions with the yoga and a few general weights sessions? Sit ups/crunches, plank variations and push-ups are also all good for the core. As mentioned above work on your whole core not just your abs. Don't go mad to start with though - climbing lots, with a bit of yoga, will help build good core strength, and watching what you eat should help you lose weight in conjuction with some cardio.

Ben



Mountain Spirit - on 22 Nov 2012
In reply to Ciro:

Hey Ciro.

This is a relaxation post.

I like this pose a lot.

Bye
Mountain Spirit - on 22 Nov 2012
In reply to Kaizen:

Hey Kaizen.

Thanks for your advice.

There are yoga poses that involve bending/twisting to.

Leg raises are involved in yoga like Fish Pose and warm ups to shoulder/half shoulder stand.

That video is like cobra pose and upward dog pose.

Bye

Savvas

Mountain Spirit - on 22 Nov 2012
In reply to seankenny:

Hey SK.

I do not really get the first part of your post.

What do you mean by smarter?

I do not know about the ABO objectives but I think tHe second part is to do with diet.

Bye

Sav
Mountain Spirit - on 22 Nov 2012
In reply to Bouldering Ben:

Hey BB.

I am loosing weight but I want to loose more.

I do circuits once a week and I am thinking of getting a bike and doing pilates.

People mention John Dunne who was really fat but really strong and had amazing footwork aswell.

Bye

Savvas
Mountain Spirit - on 22 Nov 2012
In reply to seankenny:

Hi SK.

I do not get your post!

What are you saying exactly?

Bye

Savvas
Scott_vzr on 22 Nov 2012
Cat stretch and one where you out left foot on the other knee and pull the right hamstring toward your chest.

This video at 3,20 really helps hip flexibility and core strength.
Scott_vzr on 22 Nov 2012
mikehike on 23 Nov 2012
In reply to Mountain Spirit:

Locust
sirreal - on 23 Nov 2012
In reply to Mountain Spirit: Hi Savvas. Some good advice above. I would suggest finding an Ashtanga Yoga (led primary series) class and trying that. The primary series includes most of the poses mentioned. You can do without the Pilates, weights, and to a certain extent, the cardio, if you practice the primary series regularly. A led class will teach you how to do the poses correctly and will certainly improve your core strength. You can practice at home, and it can become as addictive as climbing.
I sometimes see the primary series as a massively long boulder problem or sequence requiring strength and flexibility. You can learn about diet and about focus from it too
seankenny - on 23 Nov 2012
In reply to Mountain Spirit:

Did Alex McIntyre do yoga? Does Franco Cookson do yoga? Do swamis climb mountains? What is better, the pie inside, or the yet to be eaten pie?

Answer these questions Sawas! And you shall see great improvement.
Stone Idol - on 23 Nov 2012
In reply to Mountain Spirit: Or have a look at Love Yoga Online
lost1977 - on 23 Nov 2012
In reply to Mountain Spirit:

much better ways to build core strength than yoga
Mountain Spirit - on 23 Nov 2012
In reply to sirreal:

Hi.

I do a led yoga class every monday night already.

I practie at home and do bit at the climbing centres before I climb.

Is Ashtanga fast moving yoga?

I think I will look up those things!
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Mountain Spirit - on 23 Nov 2012
In reply to Scott_vzr:

Hey Scott

I know the pose you are talking about and I practice it a lot - we also do it ion my circuit class as a cool down stretch!

Cat pose is good to and sometimes used in sun salutations.

Bye
Mountain Spirit - on 23 Nov 2012
In reply to mikehike:

Hey Mike

Looked up this pose on the intenet today and gave it ago at The Castle Climbing Centre....

It is really good for core....

It is a lot like the (Full) Bow Pose.

Bye

Sav
Mountain Spirit - on 23 Nov 2012
In reply to lost1977:

Hey.

What other ways are there to build core strenghth?

Bye
lost1977 - on 23 Nov 2012
Ciro - on 24 Nov 2012
In reply to Mountain Spirit:
> (In reply to lost1977)
>
> Hey.
>
> What other ways are there to build core strenghth?
>
> Bye

Regular binge drinking. After a few hours you'll find yourself involuntarily tensing your abs over a porcelain receptacle. If you don't manage to get a full workout, just go back out and have another couple. Anything really fizzy will work well at this stage.
subalpine - on 24 Nov 2012
dg123 - on 25 Nov 2012
In reply to Mountain Spirit:

If you want to see how professional athletes train, you should watch Sean Mccoll's training video and see what ab work he does http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H0vOH_XGWFU However, if you want to get better at climbing steep stuff, do loads of endurance training/climbing on steep stuff.
lost1977 - on 25 Nov 2012
In reply to dg123:

but abs are only part of core strength this is what many people fail to realise and normally it's not the abs which are weak
Mountain Spirit - on 25 Nov 2012
In reply to lost1977:

You are right.

The back is part of the core to.
lost1977 - on 25 Nov 2012
In reply to Mountain Spirit:

and linked in with the back you also have shoulder function which plays quite a surprisingly large role in core stability
Paul Troon - on 26 Nov 2012
Siobhan Miller - on 06 Dec 2012
genericflipper - on 06 Dec 2012
In reply to Mountain Spirit:

The Nabhi kriya is helping me at the moment.

http://www.kundaliniyoga.org/kyt09.html

I vary between 10% and 70% of the recommended times. When reducing times it is important to do it in proportion to the other parts of the kriya, apparently.
Murd on 07 Dec 2012
In reply to Mountain Spirit:
this has done the rounds on the other channel but I not seen it here:
I find it helps me a lot...but that's got little do with climbing ;)
All very very impressive :)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=loszrEZvS_k
goosebump - on 07 Dec 2012
In reply to sirreal:
+1 for the ashtanga primary series, and for your simile of it being like a boulder circuit!

For those who dont know/do yoga, ashtanga links poses, breath and "bandhas", the two main ones being mula bandha (pelvic floor) and uddiyana bandha(slight ab tension). To link poses, breath and bandhas is the goal, and is hard work/immensely satisfying.

I like it for a lot of reasons, but the main climbing benefit for me is that all the plank poses and press up moves work the opposite muscles in my (weak, flexible) shoulders that climbing doesnt.

For the OP: A really good intro (if you know some yoga asanas already) might be "Athletes Guide to Yoga" book/DVD by Sage Rountree. It gives sensible advice on bringing strength/flexibility/focus aspects of yoga into your training, with routines aimed at specific sports runners,climbers etc.

It also makes the point that (unless perfect yoga poses is your goal) you should NOT be doing yoga practice at the expense of time spent doing your sport. So get down the wall :)
DanH9883 - on 07 Dec 2012
In reply to goosebump:

A good pilates class should build strength better than yoga.

If classes are done using reformers and other equipment then these can easily be modified to be done at home on the floor and you can devise a daily workout that takes less than ten minutes.

The good thing about pilates and yoga is that it can done on your 'rest' days with out tiring you out. This is why endurance runnners use it to build core strength without putting on extra muscle or affecting the energy left to go out running.
kev74 - on 07 Dec 2012
In reply to Mountain Spirit:
> (In reply to Bouldering Ben)
>
> Hey BB.
>
> I am loosing weight but I want to loose more.
>
> I do circuits once a week and I am thinking of getting a bike and doing pilates.
>
> People mention John Dunne who was really fat but really strong and had amazing footwork aswell.
>
> Bye
>
> Savvas

You dont need a bike for pilates
Mountain Spirit - on 31 Dec 2012
In reply to DanH9883:

Hi Dan.

Very true about yoga and pilates.
Mountain Spirit - on 31 Dec 2012
In reply to kev74:

Hiya Kev.

What I was saying was do pilates and riding a bike as cardio.

ice.solo - on 01 Jan 2013
In reply to Mountain Spirit:

just deadlift.

you ever seen a strong sadhu?
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dale1968 - on 01 Jan 2013
In reply to ice.solo: 1+ for deadlift

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