/ Tubeless tyres

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AndyBeach - on 23 Nov 2012
Does anyone on here run tubeless tyres? Thinking about giving it a go, stopping to fix punctures in gopping winter weather has lost its appeal
Horatio on 23 Nov 2012
In reply to AndyBeach: Yeah do it, they're mint. Can be a bit troublesome without an air compressor to get them to seal. Can't get downhill casings with a track pump but Maxxis Crossmark and Advantage folding tyres will go with a bit of faffage and some directed rage. Co2 works pretty well too.

Dave Kerr - on 23 Nov 2012
In reply to Horatio:
> (In reply to AndyBeach) Can be a complete and total kicking the whole kit and caboodle across the f!ing garage nightmare without an air compressor to get them to seal.

Fixed that for you.
ChrisJD on 23 Nov 2012
In reply to AndyBeach:

I've recently gone tubeless on my Bullit (my do it all bike) and (after a few initial problems) I am a total convert.

Was running Old Mavic D321 DH rims on Hopes with 2.4 High Roller II up front and 2.35 High Roller on back. 26 psi front, 33 psi back. Got enough pinch flats to get bored by it (I hate high tyres pressures)

Now running Hope Hoops with Stans No Tubes Flow-EX with Maxxis Advantage 2.4 front and rear. 19 psi front, 26 psi back.

(measured with electronic gauge)

Found that the 2.35 High Roller on back did not have enough side wall strength (leaks and came off rim) - so went to Advantages 2.4. These have been just awesome. Why have they stopped making them!

Once you get it sorted - Tubeless is (can be!) excellent, and so far low maintenance!. But not looking forward to my first real trail problem.

My riding mates are also much happier.
Dave Kerr - on 23 Nov 2012
In reply to ChrisJD:
> (In reply to AndyBeach)
>
so went to Advantages 2.4. These have been just awesome. Why have they stopped making them!
>

The best tyre I ever used on rock. Not so hot on mud.
ChrisJD on 23 Nov 2012
In reply to Dave Kerr:

> The best tyre I ever used on rock. Not so hot on mud.

Finding them 'manageable' in the muddier bit in the Dark Peak.

Seem like a good all round Peak tyre so far. Much less drag than the High Rollers, despite having a much bigger volume and running lower pressures.
neil the weak - on 23 Nov 2012
In reply to AndyBeach: I use tubeless on three of my four bike wheels.

On the whole, I really like it. I made the switch because I was getting too many rear wheel punctures and I didn't really want to use a full dual ply rear tyre for weight reasons. If you're having regular puncturing issues, then it's worth a shot (or run a dual ply and suck up the extra weight).

What I've learned doing it so far:

It's best to use a proper "full tubeless" (UST or similar) tyre on at least the rear if you're at all fast or ride nasty ground. I initially tried to stick with normal single ply tyres to save some extra weight but found they would burp air, or I'd damage the sidewalls in rocky stuff, or they just wouldn't seal up in the first place. The front is not so critical, as there's less weight & impact happening there typically.

Changing tyres can be a pain, so pick one you like and stick with it.

It can be a more expensive system to keep going than tubes. Badly holed tyres can be hard to permanently repair and a heavily dinged rim may refuse to hold a seal.


Despite all that, I still think it's the biz. Done right you end up with "nearly" puncture proof tyres at almost the weight of an xc tyre and that's worth a bit of extra hassle to me.
neil the weak - on 23 Nov 2012
In reply to ChrisJD:
>
> Once you get it sorted - Tubeless is (can be!) excellent, and so far low maintenance!. But not looking forward to my first real trail problem.


Don't even think about trying to do a tubeless repair trailside in Britain. Just bash a tube in, ride home and sort it later.
ChrisJD on 23 Nov 2012
In reply to neil the weak:

> Don't even think about trying to do a tubeless repair trailside in Britain. Just bash a tube in, ride home and sort it later.

That was the 'plan' ;-)

Chris the Tall - on 23 Nov 2012
In reply to ChrisJD:

> Once you get it sorted - Tubeless is (can be!) excellent, and so far low maintenance!.

Agree with that


> My riding mates are also much happier.

I'll be happier when my mates go tubeless - particularly the larger ones !!

Classic was at Afan, on the fairly short black section. Of the 4 of us, the other three all got snake bites within a 100 yards of each other.
balmybaldwin - on 23 Nov 2012
In reply to AndyBeach:

Yes, use them, and would never go back - the advantage of being able to run lower pressures is fantastic (not to mention the lack of punctures.

Provided you are not doing a ghetto fix and are using proper UST rims, you do not need a compressor to mount them - a track pump is fine - you just need to get the technique sorted.

The first time you do it could well be a pain, but follow these simple steps and it should be relatively painless (but do allow an hour or so the first time you do it):

1. Scrub the inside of the tyre with hot soapy water to get rid of the releasing agent used by some manufacturers. (This doesn't effect mounting, but does effect how well any goo you use works if you get a thorn. Also scrub your rims to remove any kind of debris or grit, and remove any stickers in the rim bed.

2. With the tyre still soapy (but you don't want a puddle at the bottom of the tyre) get the rim inside the tyre (but not mounted)

3. Put your valves in the rim hole, but remove the middle bit of the valve if you have removable cores. Do the rim nut up as tight as you can, and then a bit more (use pliers etc)

4. Mount one side of the tyre with tyre levers trying your best to not let the tyre slip into the middle of the rim (but don't worry too much if it does). start at the valve and make sure it mounts correctly.

5. Mount the other side of the tyre. (If you have by some miracle managed to mount both sides without the tyre slipping into the middle of the rim then skip to 7)

6. using a tyre lever, get it under the bead, and lift it on to the "shoulders" on the inside of the rim wall, slide the lever round, holding the bead in place as you go, go as far round as you can, but don't expect to get it on all the way round, you'll probably get to about 75% of the bead on the shoulder. Now do the same on the other side with care not to disturb the first side too much.

7. Attach the track pump, and inflate quickly (shouldn't need to be too quick), as you inflate you should see the tyre move, and eventually you'll hear a couple of pops as the tyre goes on. Shouldn't need to inflate to more than 35ish PSI. Inspect both sides of the tyre, you should see an indicator line approx 1 mm from the rim all the way round. if this is even, then the tyre is mounted properly ( even if you didn't really hear a pop.

8. Remove the pump to deflate the tyre

9. push against the side wall with your fingers to double check it's mounted OK. If using solid core valves go to 11.

10. squirt goo of choice through valve, then replace cores and inflate to desired pressure - Go to 12

11. Unmount a very small section of the tyre on one side, add goo into bottom of the tyre. Carefully remount the tyre, and re-inflate until the removed section pops back on, check the indicator line again, and adjust pressure to riding pressure.

12. Job done - go out for a ride to spread the goo around and enjoy the grip (or spin the tyres like buggery)


If you are having real problems inflating, then it is because you haven't got the bead seated on the shoulder properly (run the tyre lever round again), or the tyre and rim are too dry to slide into position (add more soapy water)

If you are really struggling to get the tyre mounted, mount it with a tube first, then remove one side, the tube and change the valve and then you only have to worry about one side.

My first attempt at this was a complete nightmare. Second attempt about half an hour, now I can do a set in 10 minutes with new tyres.

I also recommend for ease of use (and not needing to seal) UST tyres. they do weigh more, but I now run my tyres below 20 PSI on most terrain (upto 25 if its rocky) with no problems at all.

I do hear tubeless conversions can be a pain, but have no experience of these.

If you try to use non UST/Tubeless ready tyres, you will probably find they leak air out of the side walls badly, this can be overcome, but it's more like a 24 hour process including extra goo and repeatedly turning and re inflating tyres and monitoring pressures - probably not worth the hassle.


Horatio on 23 Nov 2012
In reply to balmybaldwin: < Applauds >
ChrisJD on 24 Nov 2012
In reply to balmybaldwin:

So where's the how-to-do-it video!
steev on 24 Nov 2012
In reply to AndyBeach:

The how-to up there is pretty good. I would add that this thing here will make your life 400% better: http://singletrackworld.com/forum/topic/ghetto-tubeless-inflator-total-cost-9p

Great for getting the bead seated.

I am a big fan of tubeless.
balmybaldwin - on 24 Nov 2012
In reply to ChrisJD:
> (In reply to balmybaldwin)
>
> So where's the how-to-do-it video!

Next time a change my tyres I might do one, the problem is that now they are done I'm unlikely to change them until they are worn out as I'm so happy with the tyres I've fitted (Conti Rubber Queen UST black chilli 2.4 front, 2.2 rear)
johnj on 24 Nov 2012 - 94.197.3.101.threembb.co.uk
In reply to AndyBeach:

Been running tubeless since back in the day first pair i got my hands on was a pair of mavic crossmax in 98 or 9, you can get any rim to seal with a very wide range of tyres but as Horatio says on some combos without decent airflow i.e a compressor you'll be pulling your hair out, cheapest way into it is cut a split in a bmx inner tube to make a rim strip use some Kevlar bead tyres but with practice wire will go, buy some stans liquid latex or similar and after reading the instructions above find a friendly garage with a decent airline and it's possible to get a set up for cheaper than a steady night out down the local.
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Orgsm on 24 Nov 2012
In reply to AndyBeach:

Been running ust tubeless a little over 6 years. One puncture in all that time. Wouldn't go back. Soapy water when mounting makes a difference to the initial seal, well worth doing. Run a little liquid latex inside about 60g worth.

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