/ Pilates

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Trangia - on 27 Nov 2012
I am recovering from a radical prostatectomy and am now feeling well enough (8 weeks on) to start doing exercises (not too strenuous) to get climbing fit again. A friend has suggested Pilates classes, something I know nothing about.

Does anyone do Pilates? Is it good for climbing?
Cake - on 27 Nov 2012
In reply to Trangia:
I've not done much of it, but from what I know I don't think it'll do anything for your arms, shoulders, calves or cardio-vascular system - all pretty crucial for climbing.

However, it'll make your core second to none, which is useful.

Cake
LennyJ1 on 27 Nov 2012
In reply to Trangia: Its more to do with you core and back but it also works other areas. It does help you flexability and I did a course of 6 weeks after pulling all my muscles in my lower back. It did help but I now just do it at home.
Sebastian Fontleroy - on 27 Nov 2012
In reply to Trangia:

I wouldn't say it was good for climbing but its good for rehab and building up your strength, stability and flexibility to ease you into more strenuous activity. I've been doing various Pilates exercises to rehab my back for the last year or so and it has definitely helped. I've progressed through isometric exercises, resistance bands to weights and now i'm up running again but i still have a long way to go. I'd recommend it to get you back moving again.
UKC Forums - on 27 Nov 2012
This thread was started in the ROCKTALK forum and has now been moved.
Please could you try and post in the correct forum, it makes life easier for both users and moderators.

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Grim - on 27 Nov 2012
In reply to Cake:
> (In reply to Trangia)
> I've not done much of it, but from what I know I don't think it'll do anything for your arms, shoulders, calves or cardio-vascular system - all pretty crucial for climbing.
>
> However, it'll make your core second to none, which is useful.
>
> Cake

Not to mention balance, core strength, mind/body connection, core strength, flexibility, core strength...

I tried yoga for a while, but found ot a bit too 'hippy' with all the wierd breathing and stuff (lets face it, who remembers to even breath when climbing, let alone breath with the diaphragm?). I've seen definite climbing improvements from once a week pilates class. And why not- it's reet good for you!
Tony Naylor on 27 Nov 2012
In reply to Cake:
> (In reply to Trangia)
> I've not done much of it, but from what I know I don't think it'll do anything for your arms, shoulders, calves or cardio-vascular system - all pretty crucial for climbing.

Fair point about CV, and it doesn't do a great deal for your calves, but I'd respectfully disagree about arms and shoulders. They'll get caned.

Ciro - on 27 Nov 2012
In reply to Trangia:

I know nothing about it but I'm about to find out... this afternoon my physio recommended pilates classes to help me recover from a slipped disk.

She's actually quite impressed with my core strength anyway, but reckons the pilates will improve it further and help my climbing as well as the recovery.
I like climbing - on 27 Nov 2012
In reply to Trangia:
I've been doing Pilates for 6 years and I recommend it. You can adapt it to suit your needs/goals.
Make sure you get proper instruction - trying to follow a video won't work.
Good luck.
Zgemba - on 28 Nov 2012
In reply to I like climbing:
> Make sure you get proper instruction - trying to follow a video won't work.
> Good luck.

This is very very true! It will be very hard to learn the correct breathing techniques and good exercise form without input from someone experienced.

Also, there is no central governing or certification body for Pilates instructors so there is also a very wide variety in what is called Pilates today. Some schools and instructors have diverged quite a lot from the original work of Joseph Pilates.
While most/all versions will work your core, the actual execution may range from almost yoga like static positions to pretty hard-core calisthenic and body weight moves.
In my personal opinion find a class/instructor that emphasizes basic mat work. Avoid classes with lots of gimmicks like rings, rollers, balls and bands. These exercises may look simple but they are actually fairly advanced and difficult to execute correctly.

I have been doing Pilates now for 5 years and it has done wonders for my back pain and improved my core and flexibility. As a result, my climbing has improved as well.

Full disclosure, I have Peak Pilates basic mat instructor certification but I am still very very far from event attempting some advanced traditional exercises, let alone teaching it.

Hope this helps.


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