/ Long Distance Runners beware!

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Bjartur i Sumarhus on 30 Nov 2012
A new study reveals potential heart problems for regular long distance runners..

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/healthnews/9712585/Too-many-marathons-can-kill-warn-doctors.html
Steve John B - on 30 Nov 2012
In reply to Game of Conkers: Not just runners, although that's the standard headline:

"They concluded that most people should limit vigorous exercise to 30 to 50 minutes a day. "

I'll have to cut back on the hot lovin' then. Sorry ladies ;-)
Bjartur i Sumarhus on 30 Nov 2012
In reply to Steve John B: I think I will continue the 30-50 min hot lovin' but cut out the post coital ciggie instead
Steve John B - on 30 Nov 2012
In reply to Game of Conkers:
> (In reply to Steve John B) I think I will continue the 30-50 min hot lovin' but cut out the post coital ciggie instead

That's 20 a day, good idea...
Liam M - on 30 Nov 2012
IainRUK - on 30 Nov 2012
In reply to Game of Conkers: I actually agree with this...

Working in ageing research I get to talk a lot to those studying centenarians.. they look at the traits/activities/genetics etc.. and when I ask about their training load they laugh..

and tell me.. forget it.. all you marathon runners are dead long before 100.. in fact one said the very trait they don't see is they rarely see centenarians who have been endurance athletes..

But there are worse things for the body, so if I'm too have an addiction its not a bad one to have and I lead a great life..
Nutkey on 30 Nov 2012
In reply to Game of Conkers:
Apart from Fauja Singh!
IainRUK - on 30 Nov 2012
In reply to Nutkey: He actually provides no evidence against the article.... he only started running once he was elderly... in fact he only got serious when he was in the 80's..
David Riley - on 30 Nov 2012
In reply to IainRUK:

Not many endurance athletes 100 years ago ?
Dauphin - on 30 Nov 2012
In reply to IainRUK:

Any good data on cardiomyopathies in endurance athletes populations Iain? I read some papers a while ago for interest / work but it seemed to be a limited to exercise physiology units in universities demonstrating that it does exist rather than any clear evidence of risk. More people seem to be taking up extreme C/V sport like triathlon and doing ultras so it would seem obvious that there will be an increase in numbers dropping due to VT/VF arrest. Do national level athletes have regular ECGs, Doppler, MRI etc to screen for this?

D
IainRUK - on 30 Nov 2012
In reply to Dauphin: No, that's the problem with a lot of ultra studies.. n values are ludicrously small.

Only at the top levels of sport will such medical tests be undertaken, and only in the competitive disciplines.
IainRUK - on 30 Nov 2012
In reply to David Riley:
> (In reply to IainRUK)
>
> Not many endurance athletes 100 years ago ?

I thought the victorians were into their walking races?
Nutkey on 30 Nov 2012
In reply to IainRUK:
You're right. Even if he had been running his whole life, he wouldn't provide any evidence - just like the article's citation of Micah True is merely an anecdote, not evidence. In fact there is zero evidence in the Telegraph itself.

The original article is here:

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025619612004739

but costs $31.50 to access... The abstract, of course, says nothing like what the Telegraph writeup says.

Further, that page includes a graph showing the mortality benefits of vigorous exercise, which purports to show that 50 minutes achieves the maximum gain. However this conclusion can only be reached by extrapolating the graph. The extrapolation does not match reality (see http://www.runnersworld.com/health/too-much-running-myth-rises-again )

Steff - on 30 Nov 2012
In reply to IainRUK:
>
> and tell me.. forget it.. all you marathon runners are dead long before 100.. in fact one said the very trait they don't see is they rarely see centenarians who have been endurance athletes..

I think until about 50 years ago most people were what we would today consider "endurance athletes". I recently found out how far my grandfather used to travel to work on foot before and after long hard shifts in the cold mines and that beats my training load easily. Although, he didn't get very old, my point is that I still believe that most endurance athletes will live a longer (and happier!) live then most contemporary sedentary people. Maybe we will se live expectancy go down in the near future ...
yorkshireman - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to Steff:
> (In reply to IainRUK)
> [...]
>
> my point is that I still believe that most endurance athletes will live a longer (and happier!) live then most contemporary sedentary people.

I think that is the key point. Most of us don't run in order to try to add x number of years onto our potential lifespan, we do it because we enjoy it, makes us happy and keeps us feeling better while we're still alive.
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Orgsm on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to Game of Conkers:

Based on a sample size of one, hmmmmmmm

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