/ most 'mountain friendly' dog breed

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ti.williams - on 04 Dec 2012
Which dog breed is best for general mountain friendliness is something I've been curious about for a long time now. What I mean by 'mountain friendly' is being fit enough and keen enough for long days walking - possibly multi-day and camping - and also able to take cold (ish) and harsh conditions, but whilst still being a nice tempered friendly pet.

When I was younger my family had a border collie which was a lovely dog who was incredibly fit and used to run with my mum most nights, and not inconsiderable distances as she ran marathons frequently. He also came out with us on long hill walks, however he wasn't really subject to particularly harsh weather conditions.

Can anyone shed any light on this or share their experiences with their dogs?

Wonko The Sane - on 04 Dec 2012
In reply to ti.williams: I don't know how much cold an Australian blue heeler can take. But in every other resepct, they are perfect. Intelligent, rugged, loyal, they don't just like exercise, they need it.
It's my dog of choice should I ever be in a position to have one.

Just not sure about the extreme cold. Perhaps someone else could comment.
Dom Whillans on 04 Dec 2012
In reply to ti.williams:
working breeds are probably your best bet. collies and springers have both been bred for long days working outside in all weathers and have prett good temperaments (though i would say that with a 4 year old springer as my main hill buddy). Though other field based dogs are very good walking companions... I'll be the first to mention a wonderful and little-known breed called Berger de Picard, which David Hooper (late of this parish) had - Chewwie B, who was a wonderful hound and loved every minute of the life he shared outdoors with David, walking, climbing, mountain biking, gorge scrambling etc in all weathers and all seasons.
shaymarriott - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to ti.williams:

Have collie-lab cross (3:1 ratio) who is strong and fit, will keep going for hours through anything, as well as easily trained and very friendly. Only issue is a bit barky towards other dogs when tired.

I'd also say another good choice is a Springer, as they're awesome (know a few!).
abr1966 - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to ti.williams: I have 2 border terriers that handle pretty much everything I throw at them!
climber34neil - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to ti.williams: I suppose the obvious would be boarder collie and springers, however smaller breeds can cope and enjoy being on the hill all day just as well and in some cases better than larger breeds, think Lakeland terrier etc, I have a miniature schnauzer who comes out walking climbing and running with me , he will keep going all day and lives being out on the fells, they were bred as working dogs for catching rats etc so inherently love being outdoors all day. They are also now classified as agility dogs and love going over the jumps/ ramps etc which seems to reflect their natural ability to scramble up and down the rocks. Mine had a great day out on north ridge of tryfan and must have covered twice the distance I did because of all the running around!! He has also been camping with me and seemed to be fine in the tent . Only thing I would say is that if having the dog from a pup is not to do to much to start as overloading can cause damage to their joints if not properly matured, so build it up gradually and you should be fine.
Kush on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to ti.williams:
Hi, Were in to our third winter season living in the Austrian alps in a village called 'Dieten am Hockonig' which is at 1000m. 50 metre's away live two Border Collies and in the village there are another three and in the next couple of villages there are at least one or more. We had 31metre's of snow last year in our village and the dogs are seen outside everyday all day long without any problems. Two of the dogs in the area go out with the mountain rescue teams and local guides, and whenever you see any of these dogs they are as friendly as could be.
Al Evans on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to Kush: Agree with other comments on here, has to be Welsh Border Collies.
Ian Black - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to ti.williams: Staffies aren't probably regarded as good mountain Dogs but mine has climbed Custs gully in winter nick. He's 10 now and when he goes tae Doggie heaven, I think a Border Collie will be the weapon of choice...
IainRUK - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to ti.williams: I've a sheep dog thing..

I once ran her over the welsh 1000m peaks, 25 miles and a good 2500m of ascent. About 6 hrs out.

I got back to Llanberis, lay on the tarmac in the car park and she dropped a rock next to me that she wanted to play with.. just totally taking the piss..
mark catcher - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to ti.williams: Long-haired Patterdale Terrier. Brilliant!
peas65 - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to ti.williams:

Got a collie, he's great when running but i think we walk too slow for him as he likes to explore when we are walking. Also has a love of sheep that we cannot cure whatever we try so he has to be on a lead near sheep which can be a pain living in the lakes.

Also take a little border terrier out on the hills, proper tough little dogs, will happily do 13 miles or will sit in front of the fire all day, fine in winter but would need a coat on very cold day.

The collie has no problems whatever the weather, but ours is a long haired one. He has happily done some grade 1-2 scrambles and is a good crag dog. Not done any multiday with him yet but planning it in spring.
ceri - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to ti.williams: terriers can be pretty good and also pack small in your tent or when you have to lift over rocky steps. We had a great winter day on helvelln with a flat coated retriever, a lakeland terrier, a jackrussel/beagle cross and a whippet staffy cross. The whippet staffy was wearing pyjamas to keep warm, but they all had a lovely time!
James Jackson on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to ti.williams:

My Black Lab loves the hills. His stock trick when climbing is to be there to great me at the top, which is always nice to top out to!
Welsh Kate - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to ti.williams:
There's a reason most Search and Rescue Dogs are collies!
Though I know one trainee SARDA dog who's a Kelpie who apparently never stops, even when the collies have run out of battery.
Andy Mountains - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to ti.williams:

Another vote for Border Collies. Ours is fantastic in the hills & mountains. Great on grade 1&2 scrambles, winter no problem for her (and she's short haired). Just did a winter traverse of crib goch with her last week with no problems at all.
Wonko The Sane - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to ti.williams: Yuo know you want one

http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/australiancattledog.htm

How can you resist!

Bred from dingos and dogs from North England.
goatee - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to IainRUK: Great story, my little terrier is a real trooper. Not up to your Collie but she regularly goes on eight and ten mile hillruns with me and while she throws herself down when we finish she is mad for fun a half an hour later. I hope to take her camping to Wales next year.
aldo56 - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to ti.williams: I'd imagine a Collie to be the best choice but that's not to say other breeds aren't capable.

I've got a Paterdale/Lakeland terrior cross and he's managed everything i've thrown at him. After 12 hours on the hill he'll hapily have some dinner then be back annoying me with his toys so stamina is not an issue.

An advtange to having wee legs is that you can be placed in a rucksac and carried over any particuarly hairy bits.

A disadvantage to having wee legs is that in deep snow you need to jump between footprints.

Collies are genrally clever dogs which should make training then for the hills easier but it really depends on the individual dog.
ti.williams - on 05 Dec 2012
Some absolutely fantastic replies, great hearing about peoples experiences with their dogs in the mountains! Sounds like another Border Collie would be right for me, however my one final question is whether there is a great difference between Collies and Border Collies with regards to being in the hills? Thanks again for the great replies!
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ti.williams - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to ti.williams: Just to clarify what I mean by Collie is a rough Collie, lassie type.
nufkin - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to ti.williams:

I've always idly fancied an Akita, reasoning that they'd be pretty hardy for moutain excursions, as well as cool (pretentious?)

I gather they're not necessarily the brightest, easiest to handle or family-friendly dogs, however.
ti.williams - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to nufkin:
They certainly are a proud looking dog! They don't seem to be necessarily un-family friendly, but they are apparently a handful.
callan87 - on 05 Dec 2012
Border Terriers,no brainer.Go all day (and night) on the hill,but also no 'edge' to them at all.Small enough to get in a 1 person tent, as said no brainer.
mark s - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to ti.williams: pretty much any breed of dog will be able to do more than we could dream of doing.
Morgan Woods - on 05 Dec 2012
alicia - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to IainRUK:
> (In reply to ti.williams) I've a sheep dog thing..
>
> I once ran her over the welsh 1000m peaks, 25 miles and a good 2500m of ascent. About 6 hrs out.
>
> I got back to Llanberis, lay on the tarmac in the car park and she dropped a rock next to me that she wanted to play with.. just totally taking the piss..

That's awesome:)
Dave - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to ti.williams:

We've taken our Welsh Springer spaniel ski mountaineering with us in Norway, which can be pretty hard work in deep snow, and he comes cross country skiing with us in winter in Finland and for winter walks at -25C without any problem, in fact he loves the snow. For a friendly temperament I think spaniels are pretty difficult to beat. They are fairly high maintenance but probably less so than a collie - not that I've owned one for comparison.
happy_c - on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to ti.williams: I have a springer, and hes stupidly fit and hardy, have done 10 hour plus days and hell keep going playing fetch all the way!

Only issue with a work bred dog, they want to work?

Not many 'work' bred will happily walk by your side, all the time, they want to do stuff! Which normally means causing problems for some other animal . . .

A springer, will try and spring stuff! Birds, rabbits, etc

A collie has a herding instinct, for sheep, people, other dogs!

Akita's are a hunting dog, for holding big game but also good for guarding, meaning they can over guard!

The key i suppose is to think what the dog will 'naturally' try and do, and do what you can to help/prevent this, so for a springer socialise to birds etc, give them something else to hunt?

Collies, get them use to sheep, early on, not in the 'let it get battered by a ewe way, although it has its uses!

Akita's - socialise them, well :D

Ive found collies are more efficient, they don't charge around like mad dogs, although will when they/you want.

A springer how ever has a suitable name, they will run around like mad nobs everywhere! which is great fun, but not safe if there is a big drop somewhere, so they do require directional/stop training to ensure they dont kill themselves, which they are all detained to do! :D

Good luck!
Rock Badger on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to ti.williams:
best dog story iv ever read totally brought a tear o my eye

http://www.ukclimbing.com/articles/page.php?id=272
Rock Badger on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to ti.williams: Get a flat coated retriever, ace dogs easy to train, not to mental,
beth on 05 Dec 2012
In reply to ti.williams: Collies, Rough, Bearded, or Border are fantastic. I'm biased to Border, currently got two, and had two previously. Collies, like Springers, like... other working breeds will not only enjoy a good romp in the hills but will need to, or you will have a bored problem dog. Not that it will mean a 10mile run every single day. Ours have been happy with two short walks of a mile or two a day, but they have always had a human around for company, fuss, and mental stimulation. It makes a huge difference. We got one of ours because he was handed in to a rescue as he had chewed his way through a door - his mom and dad were leaving him at home every day on his own.

As lots of people have said there are many dogs that will happily take a mountain walk. The only other things I'd add, is consider a rescue dog. And let the dog choose you as much as you choose them.
Ross B - on 06 Dec 2012
In reply to ti.williams:

What’s people thoughts on the Long Haired German Shepard, had a pair when I was younger, Powerful and agile, but normally happy to walk with you.

Or the Old English Sheepdog is a breed that needs some love at the moment, with low numbers, they where orignally breed for the hills of britain.

Admitedly both larger breeds.
Trangia - on 06 Dec 2012
In reply to ti.williams:

St Bernard the ultimate mountain dog

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LppH_eQlqpU
happy_c - on 06 Dec 2012
In reply to beth: Its funny you mention that, ive bId een ill recently and my 15month old, and highly loopy spaniel didnt get walked for two days, i felt aweful, but he didnt seem bothered! i think its the quality of the walk, half an hour down the road on the lead won't interest him one bit, but double that in a field working will do him a lot more good, never mind well over twice the exercise!

I tried to get a rescue, they wouldnt as we had a baby!Its a shame too, found a lovely springer collie cross that would of been a great little dog!
happy_c - on 06 Dec 2012
In reply to Ross B: My mate has a german shepherd, paid a fortun for it too, it comes out on the hills, but i suspect there back legs wont cope too well with too much work!
TheDrunkenBakers - on 06 Dec 2012
In reply to Trangia:
> (In reply to ti.williams)
>
> St Bernard the ultimate mountain dog
>
> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LppH_eQlqpU

Complete with Brandy Barrel

davidbirtles on 06 Dec 2012
In reply to ti.williams: We have a cocker spaniel. Shes mental and she will run all day no problem. She is also my dads gundog and he takes her shooting in winter alot, she will happily run in the cold and snow of the highlands all day.
Flinticus - on 06 Dec 2012
We have a rescue Border Collie and I'd be wary of getting another from a resuce centre as, from the dogbreedinfo website:

'This breed can be sensitive and should be very well socialized as a puppy to prevent shyness.'

I would stress the importance of this socialisation.

Clearly ours wasn't at all & shyness is not cute: it leads to nervousness which can then lead to aggressive defensive behaviour. Our collie will approach a person looking to make friends, all playful but as soon as that person goes to respond, he's suddenly stricken with doubt & panic and backs away, often pushing up against my leg for security / hiding under table etc. If the person persists in making overtures, then my dog may bark or pull back lips. It generally descends into a downward spiral from there. The solution is easy: the person just has to ignore my dog and the dog will then relax and after a bit of time will accept the other person as non-threatening. However, people seem to have a real problem with following such a simple instruction as to 'completely ignore him', especially other dog people, as, of course, they have special abilities!
Andy Mountains - on 06 Dec 2012
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Flinticus - on 06 Dec 2012
I should add he's a great dog on the hills & happily spends all night in my small 2 man tent (in fact he loves tents and will often try to get in as soon as its pitched, or just sit in the porch keeping an eye on things).

However, we are thinking of a border terrier for our next dog.
Andy Mountains - on 06 Dec 2012
Gazza53 on 06 Dec 2012
In reply to ti.williams: Our first dog was quite a mixture; she was 1/2 Springer, 1/4 Border Collie and 1/4 Lab. She would go all day and then still expect a walk in the evening. When she saw us getting our boots and pack on she was as excited as any child on Xmas day. We now have a Border Collie, not done as mahy hills with him, but will still go all day in all weathers.
beth on 06 Dec 2012
In reply to Flinticus: Maybe we've been very lucky to have 4 Border Collie types (1 BC/boxer direct from family, 1 pedigree BC from a rescue in the Fens, and 2 BC/golden retriever from Ireland via the Dogs Trust) that have settled in and become remarkably well adjusted dogs.

I'd always suggest looking at a rescue, because there are so many lovely dogs just needing a stable home and a bit of the right training.
Flinticus - on 07 Dec 2012
In reply to beth:
Yeah, I know. Next time, we too will probably head to the Dogs Trust but at least we will know better what questions to ask, what to look for.

Anyway I am glad we pulled our dog out of their shelter, despite the good care they provide. We love him and I would hate to think of him languishing in one of their 'cells'.
dunk5823 on 07 Dec 2012
In reply to ti.williams: Love my malamutes, they love walking, not as mad as huskies, good in the winter. Downside is they are big dogs so a one man tent is out, also you can't let them off lead with out loads of work (almost no recall instinct. Also they aren't to good if the weather is really hot.
rockjedi12345 - on 07 Dec 2012
In reply to ti.williams:

German shepher

loyal, coragous and if well trained reliable off the lead.

they are also stong enough to carry a pannier system thus being self sufficient in their own right for food etc..

and there is a reason the scottish sarda logo is a german shepherd!

http://www.sarda-scotland.org/

rockjedi12345 - on 07 Dec 2012
In reply to ti.williams:

The nepal sarda use a lot of german shepherds and belgain shepherds

http://www.sardogsnepal.asia/archives/photo-archives
Ian Black - on 07 Dec 2012
In reply to rockjedi12345: The Belgian Shepherds are getting used a fair bit in Afghanistan. Stick a Camera on them and off they pop down a cave, makes it a lot safer for the boys on the ground. They rate the them highly and reckon they're far more agile than the German Shepherd...
David Myatt - on 07 Dec 2012
In reply to ti.williams:

We're on our third border collie. Fantastic hill dogs. The coulin ridge is the only place they've struggled, but so do some folk.
rockjedi12345 - on 07 Dec 2012
In reply to Ian Black:

you wouldnt want to meet one down a dark hole!

They are a great looking dog (and a bit intimidating) but loyal and trustworthy.

Still cant beat my shepherd even though she is as mad as a buch of frogs!
Crimpchimp - on 07 Dec 2012
In reply to ti.williams: Collies are without doubt the best UK dog for the job. My last dog was a Jack Russel cross Collie and he was ACE. My new dog is a HUNTAWAY. This is a breed from New Zealand and is essentially a cross between a few types of dog but has been a pure breed for around 100 years. HUNTAWAY is not recognized by the Kennel Club but without doubt the ultimate Mountain Dog. That's wAHt they're bred for! Type Huntaway into YOUTUBE. you'll see!
Gwilymstarks on 07 Dec 2012
In reply to Crimpchimp:

My working cocker is great. Goes all day and at 9kg easy to pick up and throw over styles etc.

Looking forward to taking her out in some snow soon
jezb1 - on 07 Dec 2012
In reply to ti.williams: I looked into Huntaways when we were getting a dog. I hear they are pretty "barky" and that's how they heard cattle?

We ended up with a Collie, she's probably Welsh rather than Border. Has her issues but can go all day. She was out in the wind and hail on the Glyders today and she coped very well!
happy_c - on 07 Dec 2012
In reply to Gwilymstarks: Should of got a springer, the throw themself over styles! Also into them , over and into walls, and about any object that maybe , just maybe has something he can shove in his gob and bring back to me, included part of the wall he knocked of .....
IainRUK - on 07 Dec 2012
In reply to Crimpchimp: Wow..

I've a colliexJR and its radged in the head, well also had a liver shunt.. but she's crazy psycho little dog.. has proper temper tantrums.. one day wants a run.. then decides running certain routes is boring so sits down.. a pain in the arse..
Gwilymstarks on 07 Dec 2012
In reply to happy_c:

A Springer was my second choice but being quite a bit smaller, Daisy fits into the front hatch of my sea kayak for adventures afloat.
Ben Watts - on 07 Dec 2012
In reply to ti.williams: Any opinions on Rhodesian Ridgebacks?
happy_c - on 07 Dec 2012
In reply to Gwilymstarks: Ha ha my stupid springer would try and pull the boat hahaha i think they all act the same, or at least most ive met are the same dog different size (e.g. daft!)
Crimpchimp - on 07 Dec 2012
In reply to Ben Watts: Huntaways have Ridgeback in them. Ridgebacks are brd in Africa and they are bred to chase off Lions. They are good dogs, Long legs and fast. In my experience Ridgebacks are not keen on the Cold. They would be good but would defo need a jacket.
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Crimpchimp - on 07 Dec 2012
In reply to jezb1: They do herd with Barking. They are loud but they are Uber smart and can be trained to bark at certain time and bark on command. Young Huntaways bark a lot but well trained Huntaways are obedient and be a very good dog off the lead, Fast and cover rocky ground with ease
Ian Black - on 07 Dec 2012
In reply to rockjedi12345: Having spoken to a mate that has used the Belgian Shepherd in Afghanistan, I've narrowed it down to this and the Border Collie. My Staffie is 10 now, but very fit and I'm tempted to introduce him to a Pup rather than wait until he passes away. Mrs B doesn't know yet...:-)
Paul F - on 07 Dec 2012
In reply to ti.williams:

I've 2 border collies, but if i was to get another 'outdoor' dog I would consider a Finnish Lapphund. A smart pastoral dog, like a collie (used for herding reindeer) with the hardiness of a cold weather dog (they are one of the two breeds you can legally keep outdoors all year round in Finland. Smart and easy to train.

http://www.petplanet.co.uk/petplanet/images/breeds/Finnish_Lapphund.jpg
Paul F - on 07 Dec 2012
In reply to Ian Black:
> (In reply to rockjedi12345) They rate the them highly and reckon they're far more agile than the German Shepherd...

Malinois (Belgian Shepherds)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LbD3qzMcJxA
Crimpchimp - on 07 Dec 2012
In reply to ti.williams: german wirehaired pointer! good mountain dog
Ian Black - on 07 Dec 2012
In reply to Paul F: Very agile and powerful, mind you not much call for that aggression around my leafy suburb.
ti.williams - on 07 Dec 2012
I did a lot of research into Akita Inu's after someone mentioned them in a reply, and decided that if well trained and socialised young it could well have been the dog for me! The only downside was the potential for them to not take to newcomers to the 'pack', i.e children. However when discussing them with my brother it turned out that an uncle of ours had owned an Akita years ago but it had to be put down after attacking my uncles friend who had come in to the house when no-one was in, even damaging nerves in his arm which will never recover! I'd still consider getting one, it just makes you realise that you really do have to be extra careful, especially compared to something like a collie or a springer.
ollieollie - on 07 Dec 2012
In reply to ti.williams: i have a springer and a wire haired vizsla, the vizzy is an amazing dog!! as is the springer,

http://www.leiborschy.co.uk/images/LajkaLit/frost4.jpg
drsdave - on 07 Dec 2012
In reply to ti.williams:
Lakeland teriers, those things will put up with any shite weather thats thrown at them and they're intellegent. Think about where theyre from, Lakeland the lakes
lfenbo - on 07 Dec 2012
In reply to ti.williams: i have a 4 month old lab that im hoping to spend many years on the hills with, just to say that having spent many years wandering the fells i have lost count of the amount of labs i have seen up high so just wanted to say seems strange that labs have hardly had a mention on this thread. just an observation:-)
happy_c - on 07 Dec 2012
In reply to ti.williams: I owuld really love an akita, my friend has one and it happiply walks by his side, all the time, anywhere any weather, but its un preedictable, some dogs like mine its brilliant with other dogs it will get on edge, if said dogs doesnt back of it will go for it, and its hard to stop when it does! The worst bit is its normally the other dogs (owners) faults as there loud snappy dog is in its face barking, but the damage it does back is to severe to risk so most of the time its muzzled. His was a rescue so could of been something when it was a pup that made it like that but in general i do think socializing is very very important for them!
ti.williams - on 07 Dec 2012
In reply to happy_c:

I believe my uncles which had to be put down was also from a rescue - you're correct in saying that the key (from what I've read) to raising a well behaved Akita is socialising and training from very early on.

ifenbo - interesting observation about Labs, they hadn't really crossed my mind if I'm honest!
Banj - on 07 Dec 2012
In reply to Ben Watts:
> (In reply to ti.williams) Any opinions on Rhodesian Ridgebacks?

I have a Rhodesian Ridgeback. Couldn't ask for a better companion for 20 mile MTB rides in Epping Forest. He's fit and tireless, very intelligent and well socialised. Only real drawback is that he's not great with the cold.
Ben Sharp - on 08 Dec 2012
In reply to Morgan Woods:
> (In reply to ti.williams)
>
> surely it has to be:
>
> http://www.ukclimbing.com/images/dbpage.html?id=134701

Blimey, Chris Bonnington's let himself go!

Used to have a springer, I'm not sure if it was just here but she was fine when out and had stacks of energy (anyone who has a springer will see that as the massive understatement that it is!) but she really felt the cold. Coming back from the woods in winter she'd want to curl up and shiver in front of the fire with a blanket over her, not sure how hardy she would have been in the hills!
Ian Black - on 08 Dec 2012
In reply to Banj:
> (In reply to Ben Watts)
> [...]
>
> I have a Rhodesian Ridgeback. Couldn't ask for a better companion for 20 mile MTB rides in Epping Forest. He's fit and tireless, very intelligent





F..k me he must be intelligent if he can ride a MTB 20 miles, and I thought my Staffie was clever being able to use a Skate board!!!:-)

Ben Watts - on 08 Dec 2012
In reply to Banj: Cool, cheers for that. By cold, what sort of temperatures are you looking at comfort wise? Any better with a jacket on?
dissonance - on 09 Dec 2012
In reply to Ian Black:

> F..k me he must be intelligent if he can ride a MTB 20 miles, and I thought my Staffie was clever being able to use a Skate board!!!:-)

the clever ones drive.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-20614593
myserable old git - on 09 Dec 2012
In reply to ti.williams: Three options, a border collie (not a pedigree but from working stock) a rough coated lurcher (collie x greyhound or saluki) more fun than a collie, they have two modes out running/playing or asleep indoors, very trainable and normally nearly as bright as a collie or for something small a border terrier an unstoppable fun machine, three dogs that won't let you down of which I favour the lurcher above the others.This man breeds some great dogs (I have one my son two!)
www.hancocklurchers.co.uk/
Crimpchimp - on 09 Dec 2012
In reply to lfenbo: Hi there. No mention of labs because; They are not built for fast endurance. My family had labs when i was young and i used to run in the hills and through the countryside with them, they were all fit dogs and they tired after around 4 miles and struggled to keep up, they often needed around 1 hour to recover after that. Collies, Pointers, Huntaway's etc have lots of endurance. Labs are fine however on shorter slower paced walks etc.
lfenbo - on 09 Dec 2012
In reply to Crimpchimp: hi there,thanks for the input about labs. i see what you are saying but most peeps i have met in the lakes snowdonia etc say there labs will walk all day no problem. the opening post asked about mountain friendly dogs and not dogs built for fast endurance though so i reckon labs fit that bill and cant wait for mine to be old enough to take with me. cheers lfenbo ;-)
Crimpchimp - on 09 Dec 2012
In reply to lfenbo: any type dog will go up a mountain. Sausage dogs and all!! Labs are better than Chihuahuas
bobbybin - on 09 Dec 2012
In reply to ti.williams: For me it's Rottweillers, Im on my 2nd Rotty and they're fantastic mountain dogs. Bags of stamina, highly intelligent, very agile, they are also calm, very rarely bark and are great for wild camping, mine carries my Ultra Quasar in his pack plus his food, how many breeds can do that. They also make fantastic family pets are great with children and make great guard dogs. My Berty is getting on now and ive done a huge amount of research on other breeds but have realised that nothing comes close to a Rotty. Mine has done 25 plus Munroes and virtually every peak in Snowdonia and the Brecons many times over.
jayferg76 on 10 Dec 2012
In reply to ti.williams: We've got 2 Great Danes. Cracking dogs if you like long walks, ours go on forever.

Admittedly, they're a bugger to get over a stile if they don't want to, but they can jump them easily enough once they know what to do.
We sometimes have to peel them off the radiator on a cold day to get them out, but once there they just keep going.

Our two are a bit thick though. We were out the other week, and it was getting dark. They started stalking some unseen creature, then charged at it full pelt. It was quite funny when they both crashed into the big, nasty rock that they thought was a sheep.
Normally they don't bother with other animals, but i guess the rock monster was too tempting for them.
IainRUK - on 10 Dec 2012
In reply to jayferg76: The beauty of small collies.. welsh sheep dogs, not welsh collies.. tend to be smaller than their english counter parts.. a good 3-5 kilo's lighter if not more, so put a harness on them and you can lift them whenever needed..
Sceptical Bastard on 10 Dec 2012
In reply to ti.williams:

If there's a consensus, it seems to be towards bearded collies or border collies. Not really surprising, I suppose.

My Jack Russell is rising 15 and now no longer comes on long walks or camping trips. But in her salad days, she could go all day on mixed going and still be begging for more. The advantage of terriers is they're easy to pick up and shove in your coat if you need to carry them.

My walking buddy has a mid-sized mongrel (bit of GSD, bit of retriever, a touch of collie) and, although nine years old, she is boundlessly energetic and very sure-footed. We took her up Sgurr Alasdair a few months back and she (or, rather, her pads) coped effortlessly with the gabbro and the scree shoots.

For me, a day on the hill without a dog somehow seems to have something missing.
zen50 - on 12 Dec 2012
In reply to ti.williams:
We have a Hovawart - a German breed that almost became extinct but was revived after WW2. It is similar to a German Shepherd, but has longer hair and floppy ears. They have a very long back and lope like a wolf and run for miles - I can ride my MTB 25k in an hour and he can keep up no problem (even when riding down hill!). Excellent temperament, ours is quite self-contained but his siblings are more expressive. We live near the Pyrennees and our dog just lives for the winter (and spends most of the hot summer camped under whatever shade he can find). He has no problem scaling rocky steps when trekking and LOVES the snow - ski-touring is his favourite activity. The breed was developed as a farm watch dog in the Black Mountains, so is a good and protective guardian of the family home (and children), but not at all nasty or aggressive. Hard to find in the UK, and quite expensive as a consequence I believe, but certainly worth consideration. Incredible stamina.
Flinticus - on 12 Dec 2012
In reply to Sceptical Bastard:
You don't sound like a sceptical bastard now!
knowall - on 12 Dec 2012
In reply to ti.williams:
Our two border terriers will walk for miles in all but hot weather in the Lakes.
What about the Shetland Sheepdog or Sheltie - Hamish Brown had two that accompanied him on long distance mountain walks.
Alun - on 12 Dec 2012
In reply to ti.williams:

In late on this one with a vote for a medium sized mongrel. I have nothing against people who want to spend money on breeds but there are so many poor mutts in dog-shelters that need a good home (which you can pick up for nearly free) that it seems a shame to spend money just to get some papers.

Doubled with the fact than many mongrels are cleverer and healthier than pure-breds (due to less in-breeding) you've got a recipe for a winner.

We have a large 'mostly' labrador who has boundless energy and is great for a day out in the countryside. She also the sweetest natured pooch you'll ever meet, although she needed a lot of training when we got her. My only complaint is that she has an annoying habit of finding bouldering mats to be a very comfortable place to lie down!
https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-8xfMc3xYZes/UMhHCIDvQmI/AAAAAAAAFcE/RSt1hKjLbP8/s720/IMG_1990.jpg

she also claims she's very useful at pointing out the holds on grovelly top-outs, but I'm not so sure:
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-JTjr3Hr9sYU/UMhHFtQW9aI/AAAAAAAAFdI/4qhbnn-9dKc/s720/IMG_1998.jpg
chrismcdonald - on 12 Dec 2012
In reply to ti.williams: I have a standard Schnauzer who has done Striding Edge, Snowden in winter, Scarfell and hangs about at bottom of crags in Derbyshire all year whilst were climbing. Greets all other climbers and is happy to be out there, great dog all round.
WILLS - on 12 Dec 2012
In reply to ti.williams: I have a short haired, they come in long haired also, Weimaraner. He has done loads of grade 1 scramble and loves climbing the rocks. Copes well with the mountain bike. Loves bouldering but won't sit at the bottom of the crag. Gets bored easily. He can walk easily up to nine hours. Used to work him when he was young but went off it. He would quarter 200metres either side of me flushing out game for 6 hours. Spaniels were changed twice in the time he was on the line. If your camping or walking in the dark no one will bother you they are very alert. At 45kg they are a large powerful dog, but they still think they are teddy bears and will sit on your knee or creep on to the bed. What ever you choose I hope your dog brings as much love as mine has to me.
Aileen Smith - on 13 Dec 2012
In reply to ti.williams:

Akitas are great in cold weather - they love the snow! The only problem with mine is that he's pretty lazy so always lags behind on a run. Fine for a nice easy plod up a hill but if I'm going running I just take my Staffy. He's a wee ball of muscle, never ending energy and fun! He needs a jacket in the snow but you can't beat staffies for loyalty and intelligence.

We've had both dogs since they were 8 weeks old and both were well socialised and trained. I'd trust the Staffy off the lead with any other dog but the Akita can be quite protective. He is getting much more placid in his old age but also has recurring problems with his hind legs so I'm not keen on taking him long distances anymore. Also, having been around dogs all my life with no health problems at all, I discovered only after the Akita's first shed of his undercoat that I'm allergic to dogs...no big deal, I just take antihistamines every day!

My first dog was a long-haired Yorkshire/Cairns terrier mongrel and he was amazing for all outdoor pursuits. He came summer and winter mountaineering (needed a jacket to stop the snow from balling up on his underside), kayaking (sat in the cockpit with me) and mountain biking (would keep up even on the downhills) so just goes to show you dont need to shell out on a pure breed for a good mountain companion!
jayferg76 on 13 Dec 2012
In reply to WILLS: I can relate to that. Our 2 year old Dane is 75kg and the 11month old is currently 81kg.
They must both think they're Jack Russels, or something like that. They don't think twice about climbing up on your lap, or jumping on the bed in the night. It's like having a grown bloke jumping on you.
rousse - on 13 Dec 2012
In reply to WILLS: They are great dogs, ours died 2 years ago, on the waiting list for another in spring.
How is yours with sheep? Ours grew up in a country with none around, and he was a pain when he finally encountered them. He coped fine with hills and snow, but having to have him on a lead ALL the time due to sheep reduced the pleasure. He was fine with horses, cows and goats, but sheep were irresistible.

The new one will be having a great deal of sheep-training!
Ridge - on 13 Dec 2012
In reply to Alun:
> (In reply to ti.williams)
>
> In late on this one with a vote for a medium sized mongrel. I have nothing against people who want to spend money on breeds but there are so many poor mutts in dog-shelters that need a good home (which you can pick up for nearly free) that it seems a shame to spend money just to get some papers.

+1

Rescue centres are overflowing with fit, friendly, intelligent dogs just waiting for the chance to enjoy the hills with their new 'pack'.
Why not give a mutt the chance of a happy life than pay a fortune to a puppy farmer?
Mountain Jedi - on 14 Dec 2012
In reply to Ridge:

Working Cocker Spaniels are the answer....... think springer but two thirds the size. Mine go on for ever and as they're kennelled outside are hardy to the cold, over the last week there water bowl has been frozen solid in their kennel in the morning but they're happy and healthy...
readysalted - on 03 Jan 2013
Second vote for the St Bernard, that is of course if you plan on doubling your weekly food shop lol.

Spaniels have got to be a better option, I'm pretty sure you tend to see them quite a bit with mountain rescue (mainly because they're good working dogs anyway), but they have the energy, and obedience to go up the hills too.
John Stainforth - on 04 Jan 2013
In reply to Crimpchimp:

Strange: The Rhodesian Ridgeback is the only breed of dog I have ever had problems with. My climbing partner's Ridgeback nearly took a chunk out of my arm with no provocation whatsoever. This breed was designed to stand off lions. I have since researched them and found that they can never be totally trained (unlike Pit Bull Terriers, etc) because of their extraordinary hunting instincts.

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