/ Waterproofing Skytech Argon Gloves

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.
summitjunkie - on 10 Dec 2012
Got a pair of these specifically for digging in. Has anyone managed to waterproof the fabric backs using a method that has been tried in anger and found to keep the water out? Usually bag my hands in goretex overmitts when digging in but hands sweat like mad and the overmitts are not the best thing for handling a snow shovel, so would really like to be able to use the Argons.
James Edwards - on 10 Dec 2012
In reply to summitjunkie:
I have put nikwax on the back and this works well. However, any moisture buildup (and there is) comes from sweat.
James e
p.s. i have yet to wear a pair of there out in two years (lots of climbing and ropework done in that time)
Lukeva - on 10 Dec 2012
In reply to summitjunkie: They come with a DWR coating on (at least mine have), i'm not sure how long it will last in the field.
summitjunkie - on 10 Dec 2012
In reply to James Edwards: Cheers for that, James, I'll give Nikwax a go.
summitjunkie - on 10 Dec 2012
In reply to Lukeva: Mine must be totally devoid of any DWR. Did the usual 'sticking under the running tap test' and they wet through in 10 seconds flat.
NottsRich on 10 Dec 2012
In reply to summitjunkie: The rubberised bit is totally waterproof. I had a couple of pin prick holes in mine though which I covered with a layer of impact adhesive glue I had lying around (it's all I had to hand) and that fixed them fine. I imagine you could do the same to a larger area, although you might have problems with the fabric absorbing the glue... Otherwise you could try latex paint/liquid layex. I think you can get it from arts and crafts shops? I've always wondered about using it to repair holes in canoeing kit but never got around to trying it.
duchessofmalfi - on 10 Dec 2012
There is an skytech argon+ glove that has the rubber all over - given the cost they might be worth a pop
Ben Sharp - on 10 Dec 2012
In reply to summitjunkie: Duct tape and seam seal?
George Ormerod - on 11 Dec 2012
In reply to summitjunkie:

Based on a tip from a mate I've used thin liner gloves and marigold rubber gloves over the top for digging snow holes. As you rightly point out, it's a highly aerobic and wet. This is perfect for handling a shovel and warm enough given the activity level (and light to carry too).
summitjunkie - on 11 Dec 2012
In reply to duchessofmalfi: You're right - just had a look at the Skytech site and there is an argon glove that has rubber all over rather than just a 3/4 cover and are quoted as being ideal in the wet. However, the fingers and palm have a coating that looks what I would call 'agressive'. Sort of looks like you could sand wood with them!

Might have to get hold of a pair though for evaluation.
summitjunkie - on 11 Dec 2012
In reply to Ben Sharp: This is the modern age of mountaineering, Ben, not the 1970s - must be an 'off the shelf' answer out there somewhere, though, as a stop gap, duct tape and seam seal would work. ;-)
summitjunkie - on 11 Dec 2012
In reply to NottsRich: Could see how the liquid latex could work. Might give that a try. Cheers Rich! :-)
summitjunkie - on 11 Dec 2012
In reply to George Ormerod: Hmmm... another good tip, though I'd be looking for the Marigolds in 'snowhole black' as opposed to 'washing bowl pink'! ;-)

.... and you're spot on about it being aerobic and wet. I never work so hard or sweat so much as when I'm making my home for the night and it's blowing a bitch of a hooley outside.
nufkin - on 11 Dec 2012
In reply to summitjunkie:
>
> Might have to get hold of a pair though for evaluation.

I evaluated a pair a couple of weeks ago and had to pee sitting down for two days
summitjunkie - on 11 Dec 2012
In reply to nufkin: Ouch... maybe I'll give the evaluation a miss then! ;-)
NottsRich on 11 Dec 2012
In reply to summitjunkie: Nice one. I've not tried it so I'd be interested to hear how you get on?

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.