/ winter kit help

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1906johns - on 03 Jan 2013
Hello all,
I doing a winter ML and I need crampons and a decent axe, has anybody got any recommendations as to whats best ? I had a look at the DMM cirque but to be honest I have no idea what any of it means !
Alex
BigHell on 03 Jan 2013
In reply to 1906johns:
> Hello all,
> I doing a winter ML and I need crampons and a decent axe, has anybody got any recommendations as to whats best ? I had a look at the DMM cirque but to be honest I have no idea what any of it means !
> Alex

Try here they are cheap enough!
http://www.gooutdoors.co.uk/north-ridge-snowline-crampon-p193163
Ben Sharp - on 03 Jan 2013
In reply to 1906johns:

> ...but to be honest I have no idea what any of it means !

Probably wouldn't say that at your assessment!
Cameron94 on 03 Jan 2013
In reply to 1906johns:This is either a troll or a kind of worrying question. Should you not be the one giving the advice on these things?

I get that everybody can always learn new stuff but by the time you're working towards ML(W) I would have thought you knew at least the basics about winter kit never mind winter skills.

Either way put a search into ukc and you'll get some decent results.

1906johns - on 03 Jan 2013
In reply to Cameron94: i haven't got any winter experience and i am nowhere near doing ML(W) yet, my intention is to get the kit now (whilst i can afford it) then learn and consolidate my winter skills so that I can go and complete training and assessment.

Alex
peas65 - on 03 Jan 2013
In reply to 1906johns:

Crampons depends on boots, good common crampon all rounders are Petzl Vasak, Grivel G12/Airtech

The dmm cirque is a good axe for winter ml, as it is technical rated and you need that as you will be lowering people on it.

Go speak to a good shop, they will sort you out.
Pritchard - on 04 Jan 2013
In reply to 1906johns:

Does sound like a troll.... I'll bite...

Have you done the Summer ML training and passed Summer ML assessment? You can't do the Winter ML training or assessment until you have.

If you have no experience of winter then you are better approaching this as someone new to the sport, not someone looking to do Winter ML. The items and skills you need to learn as a beginner are the same ones you will need eventually for Winter ML. You are probably more than a few years away from Winter ML Assessment at the moment (the minimum allowed being two), so I would not recommend going out buying everything you'd need for Winter ML assessment now. You may find you don't even like winter walking/mountaineering/etc.

Good luck in your endeavours.

Craig.
1906johns - on 04 Jan 2013
In reply to Pritchard: I haven't yet has summer assessment but got training under my belt. Thats a very interesting point of view, thank you Craig
almost sane - on 05 Jan 2013
In reply to 1906johns:
Get something cheap.
Better still, for your first outings borrow kit from other people.

There is no "best" ice axe - what works for my body and my style might be brilliant for you, or it might be rubbish.

See how you get on.

For axes, weigh up the pros and cons of longer v shorter axes, straight v curved shafts, lighter v heavier. What sort of leash, or do you go leashless?
The Petzl website is very informative, even if you don't buy their kit http://www.petzl.com/us/outdoor/ice-axes-0

As for crampons, the first thing is they must fit your boots.
I also set a lot of value to how easy they are to put on and take off - minimising faff is the way to go.
If there is no anti-balling plate and you are going out in wet snow, consider gaffer taping the bottom.
The Ex-Engineer - on 06 Jan 2013
In reply to 1906johns: There is a slight issue in that the 'best' axe for a Winter ML course is not really the best axe for doing anything else.

What you want for your ML Winter is a relatively long and heavy axe with a forged head and a wide adze. However, that is a moot point given that there is nothing ideal on sale these days - everything is just a bit too lightweight for serious digging or step-cutting. The fashion is also towards shorter axes.

As such, a 55/60/65cm DMM Cirque, depending on your height, will be as good as anything else available.

However, there is nothing special about mountaineering axes so I'd consider saving money and look at picking up something fairly substantial second-hand. You won't go far wrong with a Mountain Technology Mountain Axe or Alpine Axe and there are always a few knocking around on a well known auction site.
ads.ukclimbing.com
george mc - on 06 Jan 2013

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