/ Superfeet Footbeds

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malc - on 10 Jan 2013
Do Superfeet Footbeds really make a difference? I would welcome any feedback/comments.

Cheers

Malcolm
edunn on 10 Jan 2013
In reply to malc:

They were reccomended to me when I had problems with my knees about 10 years ago. Have used them in my climbing boots ever since.

However, their effectiveness (in my mind) has been questioned by the new 'theory' surrounding bare-foot-running. The thought that no support is better than some support (as it's more natural for the foot) is contrary to the super-feet blurb.

Basically, that was a very convoluted way of saying, if I had problems with my knees now I wouldn't go for super-feet, but 10 years ago they seemed to help so I just keep them in my walking boots out of habit.

I should add that I don't wear my walking boots every day.

Probably not the definitive response you wanted!?
In reply to malc: Also got some about 12 years ago and have use them since - actually both my pairs are knackered now I should probably replace. I used to get bad foot pains after a mountain day, particularly in rigid boots and shin splints from jogging. After getting superfeet this stopped. Could have been placebo effect or could have been completely by unconnected chance - but they seemed to work for me.
malc - on 10 Jan 2013
In reply to edunn: thanks for your response. I have a 3/4 inch shortening in on leg due to a fracture femur in my youth. I don't have knee problems but I do suffer with some lower back aches. Just thought these may help. I would welcome other comments.

Cheers
RCC - on 10 Jan 2013
In reply to malc:

I tried a pair a few years back and I could barely walk after days out with them. I pulled a pair of standard footbeds out of an old pair of walking boots to replace them and had no further problems.

I checked that they were the correct type for my feet, but I just didn't get on with them at all. Lots of people really rate them though, so might just be something you have to try for yourself.
CurlyStevo - on 10 Jan 2013
In reply to malc:
what problem are you trying to solve?
geordiepie - on 10 Jan 2013
In reply to malc:

I got them to provide a bit of stability after a nast ankle injury and they seem to have made a difference in that respect. I think my feet are also less tired after long days, especially when carrying loads.

I wouldn't expect miracles but for me they're definitely an improvement on most standard insoles.
malc - on 10 Jan 2013
In reply to CurlyStevo: I have changed my boots to a bigger size as I was having numb toes. Think my arches my have sunk with age. I thought these Footbeds would help also support any back/hip.
GrahamD - on 10 Jan 2013
In reply to malc:

I use them in walking boots, ski boots and every day approach shoes. If I don't I seem to suffer all sorts of niggles to knees and feet.
CurlyStevo - on 10 Jan 2013
In reply to malc:
I tried them mostly to help with sore balls of my feet and heal lift and they didn't help at all with that.

I just use Scholl Air-Pillo Gel Insoles under my normal insoles now - they make my feet more comfy in B3s. I have very high arches though so the opposite issues to you I imagine.
m0unt41n on 10 Jan 2013
In reply to malc: I have very wide feet so end up with boots 2 sizes too large. I would then find my toes went numb after a few hours, very painful. As if boot was too tight which made no sense. Finally worked out my feet were sliding forward and toes hiting front of boot. I was recomended to put in the Superfeet (Green version) to help hold my foot in place, has worked a treat, not had a problem since. My feet actually measure in terms of length 9.75 and 10 but I need 12 or 48 in boots to get sufficient width. Great at altitude since it means I can wriggle my toes to try and keep them warm.

Only issue is that Superfeet seem very expensive and rarely much discount.
malc - on 10 Jan 2013
In reply to m0unt41n: I have had a similar experience with my boots and feet. I think I will give them a go.

Thanks
jayjackson - on 10 Jan 2013
In reply to malc:
I have used a pair on and off in walking boots and mountain boots for the last few years.

I found the heel cup really good for reducing movement of the foot in the boot, makes climbing in boots a lot more precise, but then I have pretty narrow heels, so this may be only relevant for people with equally weird shaped feet!

Don't really bother with them in walking boots any more, haven't found personally that they absorb much impact, so tend to use some Sorbathane insoles if I know I have a lot of road walking to do.

Big Lee - on 10 Jan 2013
In reply to malc:
> (In reply to edunn) thanks for your response. I have a 3/4 inch shortening in on leg due to a fracture femur in my youth. I don't have knee problems but I do suffer with some lower back aches. Just thought these may help. I would welcome other comments.
>
> Cheers

If you've got a 3/4 inch shortening due to a fracture then start with an internal raise inside your boot. It's common to get lower back (or hip or pelvic pain) in the presence of leg length discrepancy. Particularly if it's in the region of 3/4 inch. Forget about Superfeet footbeds, etc until you've worn a raise regularly. Try one of these:

http://www.talarmade.com/products/599-proheel-orthotics.aspx

Order the 12mm and try it out. These come with a couple of 3mm wedges that you can stick to the base to make the height up to around 3/4".

Who measured the shortening btw? Maybe ask your GP to refer to an orthotist (like myself) to check the the shortening height and assess the most practical way of accommodating the shortening. Lower back aches associated with shortening only get worse if not addressed.
malc - on 10 Jan 2013
In reply to Big Lee: thanks. I use a foot lift in my everyday shoes but not tried in my hill boots. The 'wedge' I have is fairly solid and I worry that in my boots it may cause blisters.
Big Lee - on 10 Jan 2013
In reply to malc:

I would definitely wear it in your boots. Good, supportive footwear such as hill boots will be fairly stiff in the sole between the heel and the balls of the feet are so it shouldn't matter how stiff the wedge is. Also, boot uppers tend to 'clip-in' less above the heel so generally there is less risk of rubbing when wearing a raise.

Just to clarify, you'll be getting the back ache because the shortening will be causing your pelvis to be dipped on the short side. Your lower back then has to laterally flex to accommodate this and effectively bring your spine back to vertical. This leads to the aches/pains. Often people will feel it more on one side. Don't bother with Superfeet, etc. You'll be wasting your money as they won't do anything for your back - whatever the shop assistant tells you.
malc - on 10 Jan 2013
In reply to Big Lee: thanks for the advise, I will try my inserts and see how things go. The shortening was measure by a physio a number of years ago. I have had spodotheliosis (not sure about the spelling) and have so lower vertebra fused together. Just started with a numb pain in the lower back again.
Stuart the postie - on 10 Jan 2013
In reply to malc:

I wear them in my Postie shoes (managed to get them through work from Tisos).
I find that they stop my feet sliding about inside shoes, going down hill and that they slow down the rate of wear on heels of my soles.

As you could imagine, I do a lot of walking!

Stuart

ps. I don't wear them in my winter boots, Scarpa Thermal Insoles
Bloodfire - on 10 Jan 2013
In reply to malc: A guy once read the sole of my boot... kinda like a palm reader and suggested I look into getting some insoles. Thus I hobbled off to the nearest outdoor gear pusher to try some on. As I stood, I was a transformed man. My hobbling body was finally upright.

... yeah, I find they work, now i have a good few sets, some that swap between pairs of footwear.
nufkin - on 11 Jan 2013
From what I've had explained to me, Superfeet are supportive, rather than corrective, so if you have actual medical problems you'd be better with a properly made orthotic. Otherwise, they just reduce the stretch/roll/spread/etc in the feet that can apparently have knock-on effects up through the body.
I have a pair and think they do help, but I think it mostly comes down to what the problem is you're trying to solve.

Re barefoot running craze - I assume that the superfeet would still be worthwhile in boots, since footwear or no footwear the walking action (heel-toe) is different to the shoeless running action (prancing on balls of feet), so presumably the foot would still benefit from extra stabilization.
edunn on 11 Jan 2013
In reply to malc:

The Super-Feet at the same time as physio seemed to work for me, so best of luck.

;-)

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