/ is there something that is better than chalk ?

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BolderLicious - on 11 Jan 2013
Is there something more "sticky" than chalk and would it be ethical to use on crags? Could this be the future for technically harder climbing?
Mr. K - on 11 Jan 2013
In reply to BolderLicious: Cheese?
nniff - on 11 Jan 2013
In reply to BolderLicious:

Wet hands - apparently the ridges on your fingers and toes that you acquire after a long soak in the bath increase your grip on wet things.

So if you were to use pof on crags in the UK, you would be able to climb out of the river into which you would be thrown.

Various other concoctions (megagrip?) were all rather a waste of time and effort and I haven't seen them for years.
BolderLicious - on 11 Jan 2013
In reply to nniff:
Of course if you used superglue you would get caught red-handed cheating!
Landy_Dom on 11 Jan 2013
In reply to BolderLicious:

Strangely I have noticed that when I rub spots of mud off my climbing shoes prior to starting a route on limesone, not only does the rubbing of the damp and abrasive mud "tack up" my shoes beautifully, when i rub the excess from my hands off on my trousers, leaving my hands slightly dirty, they're really quite grippy and I rarely need chalk. Totally eco-friendly :-)
DANNYdjb on 11 Jan 2013
In reply to BolderLicious:
isopropyl alcohol.
Gerry_Doncaster - on 11 Jan 2013
In reply to BolderLicious: Personally I've never used chalk and never will. I've always been happy to rely on nothing more than my own bare hands and fingertips. Anyway in answer to your question, I know someone who uses thin rubber gloves for climbing, he swears by them but I think this is definitely getting into the realms of "cheating".
Jimbo C - on 11 Jan 2013
In reply to BolderLicious:

Dirt and spit are pretty good
BolderLicious - on 11 Jan 2013
In reply to Gerry_Doncaster:
Let's just hope he doesn't use rubber gloves on the moors away from the crags!
Madden - on 11 Jan 2013
In reply to Gerry_Doncaster: I've once used thin rubber gloves at an indoor wall for a bit of a giggle. Safe to say, it definitely did not improve matters.
Gerry_Doncaster - on 12 Jan 2013
In reply to BolderLicious:
> (In reply to Gerry_Doncaster)
> Let's just hope he doesn't use rubber gloves on the moors away from the crags!

Ha ha, you never know, we've got our suspicions about the guy!
andypg - on 12 Jan 2013
In reply to BolderLicious:
Golden syrup
adstapleton - on 12 Jan 2013
In reply to BolderLicious:

Try going without chalk - i never need it and i think a lot of people would be surprised at how unnecessary the stuff actually is
Gerry_Doncaster - on 13 Jan 2013
In reply to adstapleton:
> (In reply to BolderLicious)
>
> Try going without chalk - i never need it and i think a lot of people would be surprised at how unnecessary the stuff actually is

Agree 100%. I've never used it and never will. I think the benefits are largely psychological and a lot of climbers develop a mental dependency on it to the point that they feel they can't climb without it. I been out with people who haven't wanted to climb when they've forgotten their chalkbag. Ridiculous.
Lukem6 - on 13 Jan 2013
In reply to Gerry_Doncaster: Try sweaty skin, soft moist skin is tackier than chalk anyway. Also soft skin tears less.

Another vote for chalk, but I may throw in a vote for rubber gloves also.
gunbo - on 13 Jan 2013
In reply to BolderLicious: do French people not use some sort of resin/sap on bouldering routes ? I don't tend to use chalk outdoors find I get on without it fine. But indoors I use chalk a lot so go figure.
ablackett - on 13 Jan 2013
In reply to BolderLicious: I was thinking the other day about using double sided sticky tape on boots for key moves. Have a bit ready, reach down before the key move, stick it to your boot, then rub it off again.

Not ethical as it would leave residue on the rock, but I reckon it would help.
nasher47 on 13 Jan 2013
In reply to BolderLicious:
The french use something referred to as "pof" it is a kind of soft resin that is very sticky - it leaves a really nasty residue on the rock that quickly turns to a polished hard sheen that is very hard to brush off.
Chalk isn't used because it is "sticky" which rather negates your post and all of the replies IMO. It is used in order to dry the hands which are inevitably a bit sweaty and therefore slippery.
To those who are advocating not using chalk at all I have to agree to an extent, certainly on many routes or problems (particularly on easy ones) it really isn't necessary and I find it really funny when people chalk up to do their juggy warm up traverses indoors however I must admit I find it helps on harder stuff.

To the OP surely the answer is to work on getting stronger fingers than finding was of making your hands more sticky or are you planning on becoming the next spiderman?
The Ivanator - on 14 Jan 2013
In reply to BolderLicious: is there something that is better than chalk ?
Most normal climbers prefer Limestone, Grit, Granite, Gneiss, Dolerite, Rhyolite, Slate, Sandstone etc.

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