/ Calculating your own DIN setting

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Denni on 11 Jan 2013
Evening all,
does anyone know of some sort of accurate industry standard type chart that I could use to calculate my DIN settings?

I went to Snow and Rock today and they calculated that my DIN was about 4.75 which doesn't sound right at all from the last couple of times I've had it done. (a while back now)

They used the following:

Type of skier, 1-3. I went for 2, average skier, average release
Height/weight, 183, 105kg
Age and type of skier, 44 and skier 2 as above, this gave me a code
Sole length, 322 (Scarpa Spirit, mondo 28.5) gave me another code

Then they had a table which you cross referenced all the above and it gave me the DIN of 4.75. They checked it all again and again 4.75. I think it should be about 7 but they seemed adamant.

Anyone any pointers as to why they think it is that and why I think it Isn't?

Thanks in advance, Den
ClimberEd - on 11 Jan 2013
In reply to Denni:

A lot is personal preference once you are an experienced skier. I run mine at 10 but then I don't want my skis to come off except in extremis (70kg.)

Whatever your standard if you are 105kg then 4.75 is too low, I would have thought 7 at a minimum.

(usual caveats apply about advice from strangers on the web if you hurt yourself!)
MG - on 11 Jan 2013
Denni on 11 Jan 2013
In reply to ClimberEd:
> (In reply to Denni)
>

> (usual caveats apply about advice from strangers on the web if you hurt yourself!)

I know, thats whay I went to S and R! Using the posted link above, comes out straight away at 7.

Going to go back tomorrow and find out how they worked it out at that.
due - on 11 Jan 2013
In reply to Denni:

If they were using the Salomon chart, they were reading your weight off as lbs not kgs
Paul Hy - on 11 Jan 2013
In reply to due: you beat me to the Lbs-Kg f... up!
due - on 11 Jan 2013
In reply to Paul Hy:

Aye, I can't figure out any other way they'd get the .75 from except by adding to (rather than reading down from) one of the kid sizes. Don't think any manufacturers bother with 1/4s and 3/4s except in the very low ranges.

Take 'em back, make a fuss, and point out how far wrong they were (very). Someone at that shop shouldn't be touching bindings.

In the meantime just imagine all the fun moments you could have had with your skis randomly ejecting. Even 7 is probably a bit conservative as your height comes before your weight on the chart.
Rob Exile Ward on 11 Jan 2013
In reply to Denni: Interesting question. Do a google - I'm sure you'll find a chart somewhere.

Nowadays I'm more confident taking a screwdriver with me and setting my own settings than having someone in your 'average' shop do it. It's not an exact science, and most shop assistants are ... shop assistants.

HeMa on 12 Jan 2013
In reply to Denni:

DIN is set up by crankin' it all the way and then half a rotation back.
Frank4short - on 12 Jan 2013
In reply to Denni: Go to the max on the binding, then adjust it back down 0.5-1.5 so as the springs are eased off enough so as they don't react abnormally at their absolute range limits. It's what everyone does, no? ;)
pdone on 12 Jan 2013
In reply to Denni:
Setting ski bindings according to manufacturers' charts is a good starting point but I suggest you might find the answer to your problem on this web-site www.ski-injury.com/prevention/st

This tells you how to self-test your bindings and thereby 'fine-tune' them to your own ligament/tendon strength and not an average one. In carrying out this test on the rear bindings you will probably find you need to find a way to trap the tail of the ski to stop it lifting off the ground; I usually get a mate to stand on it.

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