/ Indoor spotting

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.
Nick Allen - on 14 Jan 2013
I've had a debate with someone recently who thinks that indoor spotting is pointless.

I disagree, if I'm spotting its to guide a fall safely and minimise the chance of injury, we all know the pads can't completely save you.

It's even comforting sometimes to know that when I'm on a sketchy move in the gym that someone might be able to stop me stumbling upon landing.

In some cases it might be more dangerous (I.e taking a whipper from 4m up may mean you end up kicking some spotter in the head) but I think my point is generally valid. If I'm instructing then the last thing I need is a kid getting hurt and if I'm training I don't want my partner breaking her ankle.

I'm interested in the community's opinion on the matter
sduke85 - on 14 Jan 2013
In reply to Nick Allen: Spotting is never pointless full stop. Just because there is a foot of matting below us does not mean we should switch off.
Morgan P - on 14 Jan 2013
In reply to Nick Allen: Bouldering indoor I'll generally not have a spotter, with the exception of if I'm a reasonably height and have a chance of landing on my head.

If anything I'd say that I need to be used to a slight sense of danger, how could I push myself on trad / bouldering outdoors if I feel unsafe in a bouldering gym?
winhill - on 14 Jan 2013
In reply to Nick Allen:

It's mostly pointless.

Stopping you falling on your head or neck is good, stopping people from walking under you is good.

Stopping you stumbling after you fall on your feet? Really?
Neil Williams - on 14 Jan 2013
In reply to Nick Allen:

Being big and heavy I don't tend to like people spotting me, as it puts a concern in my mind that I might injure them if it isn't done properly and I land on them, and I'm reasonably good at falling safely (even if it does look like a sack of spuds).

Neil
Nick Allen - on 14 Jan 2013
In reply to Morgan P: it's not really a question of feeling unsafe, I think I'd rather have someone there so an indoor fall renders me injured so I can't go outdoors and climb. I guess in your case if it doesn't bother you then why should it matter.
I like climbing - on 14 Jan 2013
In reply to Nick Allen:
I'm with you on this - spotting makes sense
Nick Allen - on 14 Jan 2013
In reply to winhill: 90% of the time if I land on my feet it's because I've anticipated the fall so if I know it's probably going to happen and the person will probably be ok then I won't be so attentive.

I suppose I would rather not stumble into someone else's path if its busy on the mats etc.
Nick Allen - on 14 Jan 2013
In reply to Neil Williams: I agree, I probably wouldn't spot someone much bigger than me because I'd snap like a twig which is why my partner doesn't spot me so often. If I landed on her it would probably hurt so she's better off just watching the floor for people under me.
Monk - on 15 Jan 2013
In reply to Nick Allen:

I may be unusual in that I have done nearly all my bouldering on my own, so I am used to not having a spotter (generally, if I have partners, I am doing routes). Spotters can be great, especially when high, but generally indoors I don't tend to see the point. They are sometimes useful on awkward or overhanging moves where there is a strong possibility of an inverted fall or simply as crowd control, but generally I don't think they are required.

On the flip side, I think that learning to fall safely is a vital skill for safe bouldering, so is worth practicing.
mrchewy - on 15 Jan 2013
In reply to Nick Allen: Depends on the wall as well. Northampton's boulder room is only small and can get quite busy. Lots of volumes on the panels can mean you get pretty horizontal at times and a fall could see you lurching off into other punters quite easily. At a bigger wall with lots of space, that's just not an issue.
Sometimes it just makes sense to spot someone.

Kelvin
Durbs on 15 Jan 2013
In reply to Nick Allen:

Yeah - not always, but on horizontal moves, or moves with a high foot which may bget stuck leading to an inversion, I ask for a spotter.
Or dynos if it's busy...
Ava Adore - on 15 Jan 2013
In reply to Nick Allen:

Because I have a dodgy back, I climb very statically and down climb every problem. I rarely risk doing a move that might result in a fall but if I do want to challenge myself, I will ask for a spot. I'm comparatively light and my climbing partner is strong so he can provide good support. If for example I want to climb an overhanging problem which is difficult to descend, he will support me on my hips whilst I lower down.

I do also find it motivating to have someone below watching me climb - like many people I do climb much better if I'm being encouraged.
redcal - on 15 Jan 2013
In reply to Nick Allen: Often have a spot when bouldering indoors, came in really handy when a small child ran underneath me at the Works just as I popped off the top hold...spotter threw (literally like a rugby ball) the child out of the way just in time for me to not land on his head arse first. Needless to say the kids Dad was greatful for the spotting tactics!
idiotproof (Buxton MC) - on 15 Jan 2013
In reply to redcal:

I'm generally of the opinion that if I have a spotter, I have a belayer so what am I doing bouldering. This theory works both indoors and out.
Arms Cliff - on 15 Jan 2013
In reply to idiotproof (Buxton MC):
> (In reply to redcal)
>
> ... I have a belayer so what am I doing bouldering.

Getting stronger? Getting more volume in for a given amount of time?

Fraser on 15 Jan 2013
In reply to Nick Allen:

Are you talking about spotting a leader or a boulderer?

I hardly ever spot or expect to be spotted for the former, (some exceptions, but in that case I'd clip the first draw in advance) but if I'm bouldering I like to have a spotter if I'm up high & sketching of for potentially dodgy moves, eg something involving double heel-hooks where I'm anything more than 3' off the deck!
idiotproof (Buxton MC) - on 15 Jan 2013
In reply to Arms Cliff:

I know its benefits... I just dont find it interesting. Not that I find indoor climbing really that interesting as a whole.
Nick Allen - on 15 Jan 2013
In reply to Fraser: I'm talking bouldering. I would spot on lead for dodgy first clips and outside.
Jimbo C - on 15 Jan 2013
In reply to Nick Allen:

If I was doing some horizontal moves a fair way off the mat, I would appreciate a spotter ready to slow down my shoulders to ensure that my feet land first. Otherwise, I don't think it's necessary. Outside there is a much greater need for someone to ensure that you actually land on the mat.
ads.ukclimbing.com
winhill - on 15 Jan 2013
In reply to Ava Adore:
> (In reply to Nick Allen)
>
> Because I have a dodgy back, I climb very statically and down climb every problem.

Wouldn't you be better off on top rope?

When I've had back and very bad knee trouble I wouldn't even down climb.
Ava Adore - on 15 Jan 2013
In reply to winhill:
> (In reply to Ava Adore)
> [...]
>
> Wouldn't you be better off on top rope?
>
> When I've had back and very bad knee trouble I wouldn't even down climb.

Yes. And I'm fine leading too. The harness provides great support. But

a) I like bouldering
b) The only decent roped venue near me is always rammed of an evening
c) I go to a yoga class at a bouldering wall so I have a potter before/after
Flinticus - on 15 Jan 2013
In reply to Monk:
I agree and am in a similar position.

I've never used a spotter, even at the TCA Glasgow which has some high over hanging problems ending in a dymanic lunge. If I feel sketchy I don't go for the last hold, and after breaking an ankle last year (not bouldering), I tend to down climb anyway (plus that's good training).
DJonsight - on 15 Jan 2013
In reply to Nick Allen: In my experience, most indoor spotting is done by hopeful men to pretty female climbers.
Nick Allen - on 15 Jan 2013
In reply to DJonsight: those tend to be the people not aiming for the shoulders....
punkpunk - on 20 Jan 2013
In reply to Nick Allen: The majority of folk I see spotting don't do it very well anyway, proper spotting is effective and useful inside on certain problems. Most spotting you see just involves standing around with arms in the air while the folk climbing hit the deck, maybe with a wee nudge on the way down if your lucky/unlucky.

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.