/ Radios

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mrbird - on 26 Jan 2013
Allo folks. Seen a couple of lads on the Ben the other week using radios and thought it was a good idea. Can those of you who use radios give me some advice on light, long lasting life and sturdy radios? Any other advice would be appreciated.

Cheers

dale1968 - on 26 Jan 2013
In reply to mrbird: i bought ones from a cycling website, any of those for about 40 fit the bill
mattking_109 - on 26 Jan 2013
In reply to mrbird: I have an odd pair of radios:

I have one of these: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Binatone-Action-950-Range-Radio/dp/B002HXWG5K

and one of these: http://www.argos.co.uk/static/Product/partNumber/5530908.htm?CMPID=GS001&_%24ja%3Dkw%3A{keyword}...

The main difference is in battery life. The more expensive binatone one hold 4 AAA batteries whereas the cheaper argos one only holds 3 AAAs. Both will easily last a full day of constant use, but I always change the batteries in the argos one before my next trip; if I don't they will usually run out half way up a route which isn't great! The binatone radio lasts for two full days use before I need to recharge the batteries (this is another advantage of the binatones - it comes with rechargeable batteries and charging dock).

Only other difference really is that there is a volume control on the binatone, but I've always found the argos one loud enough

Just depends on your budget really, both will do the job fine!


CMcBain - on 26 Jan 2013
In reply to mrbird:

A few people recommended me the 'cobra' ones - http://www.amazon.co.uk/Cobra-MT600-Walkie-Talkie-Radio/dp/B000SA93L4/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=135... I've used them every time i've been out since I got them and find them great, as do the people I climb with. Sound is always clear even on windy days and winding routes and they happily deal with a full day of use, i'd imagine they could go two but not tested yet. They also seem to be fairly sturdy, as i've dropped mine in snow alot and used them with soaking wet gloves. Nice and cheap also incase you lose/break one.
CMcBain - on 26 Jan 2013
In reply to mrbird:

Forgot to mention a slight annoyance, quite a few people use radios and you can often pick up other teams speaking to each other which can be confusing. I swear i've also heard what sounded like someone in a helicopter speaking while I was mid-pitch.
Orgsm on 26 Jan 2013
In reply to mrbird:

Motorola unit with circular aerial you can clip a karabiner through. Tune away from default channel and sub channel. Get one with an ear piece . Have some per arranged squawks like three squawks for safe etc in case too much wind noise to hear clearly. Get one with big dials buttons for use when wearing gloves. Charge up each night. If you get the garmin rhino they also have GPS. So if separated, or caught by avalanche you may be able to locate from GPS coords of partners. Not as good as transceiver obviously.
mrbird - on 26 Jan 2013
In reply to A Game of Chance: Have you got a link or know a site where I can have a look at these bad boys?
Orgsm on 26 Jan 2013
In reply to mrbird:
> (In reply to A Game of Chance) Have you got a link or know a site where I can have a look at these bad boys?

The garmins or Motorola?
mrbird - on 26 Jan 2013
In reply to A Game of Chance: Both please.
Starkey92 - on 26 Jan 2013
In reply to mrbird: we use Motorola's at work, pretty bomproof things
mrbird - on 26 Jan 2013
In reply to Starkey92: Im just wondering if there are any mountain/ climbing specific ones with big buttons, attachments for leashes, bomb proof, waterproof ones that can take AAs for ease of changing batteries etc.
Starkey92 - on 26 Jan 2013
In reply to mrbird: pretty sure its these ones we use http://www.motorola.com/Business/XU-EN/Business+Product+and+Services/Two-Way+Radios+-+Licensed/Porta... The button on them is easily pressed with gloves on. Not sure about attachment points for leashes tho. There reasonably waterproof and bombproof, weve used them on all sorts of locations in pretty horrible weather and that dosnt seem to have phased them overly! Wont run on AA batteries tho. Really not sure about mountain ones, i havent ever seen them used in the hills personaly
mrbird - on 26 Jan 2013
In reply to mrbird: Most radios are tucked away somewhere with a wired earpiece attachment coming from the handset. One I used in the forces i kept in my bag and just fed the wire through a hole and wore the headset. I`ll be having a good look anyway. Cheers folks
nufkin - on 26 Jan 2013
In reply to mrbird:

I quite like the idea of the throat microphone things as worn by GI Jane and the like - would save fumbling around in pockets in spindrift avalanches etc. Can people who aren't Navy Seals get such things?
Nigel Thomson - on 27 Jan 2013
In reply to mrbird: I see the logic but for me it spoils the adventure. Not criticising but with a regular partner you can almost feel what the guy is up to and as you move off the belay and everything starts to go tight there's no better feeling.
Jim C - on 27 Jan 2013
In reply to mrbird: I have a cheap and cheerful pair that I use mostly areas where mobiles will not work , they can be useful when visibility is bad .

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