/ "Mountain Sickness Scorer" Android App

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Fishrubb on 27 Jan 2013
Hi guys. I'm a doctor with an interest in mountain medicine who has made a free Android App to help people identify acute mountain sickness.

Search 'Mountain Sickness Scorer' on the Google Play Store.

The App takes you through 5 simple multiple choice questions to help identify how likely it is that you have acute mountain sickness. It doesn't need the internet to function so you can download it onto your phone before your trip and use it if you need it.

Spread the word! Altitude sickness is completely preventable but unfortunately still kills in some cases.

Fiona
Orgsm on 27 Jan 2013
In reply to Fishrubb:

You got a link I can click. It should prompt to install on my phone then.
snowboarder on 27 Jan 2013
Denni on 27 Jan 2013
In reply to Fishrubb:

CASE medicine?
Withnail - on 27 Jan 2013
In reply to Fishrubb:

Hi Louise,

Just wondering, is this based on the lake louise scoring system or another one?

cheers

Jon
Withnail - on 27 Jan 2013
In reply to Fishrubb:

err just looked at my question above and realised your name "louise" and
asking about the "lake louise" scoring system may seem as if I was trying
make a joke.

Not the case, just a coincidence. Genuine question

Jon
Withnail - on 27 Jan 2013
In reply to Fishrubb:

...eek just realised your name is fiona not louise. Where the heck did I get Louise from? I am a buffoon. Apologies

Jon
Fishrubb on 27 Jan 2013
In reply to Withnail:

Hi Jon

Yes its the Lake Louise Scoring system. I've only recently posted the app so would be grateful for any feedback.

Fiona
CarolineMc - on 27 Jan 2013
In reply to Fishrubb: Downloaded thanks. Will try it with the youngsters on my exped this year. To be honest the Lake Louise System is easy for them to get their heads around but if they have an app it might encourage them to check their buddy more often! Co:
Withnail - on 27 Jan 2013
In reply to Fishrubb:

Hi Fiona,

I dont have any compatable devices at the moment but will give some more feedback when I get hold of my stepson's android tablet:)

For what its worth though:

1)Raising awareness of AMS, HACE and HAPE symptoms has to be a good thing
2)As Carolyn mentioned, perhaps this will provide more engagement for kids/teenagers on expeditions
3)Limitations with apps on remote expeditions with battery power

As i said, I havent seen the app but a great idea. Perhaps there could also be an opportunity for raising awareness of sensible ascent profiles? ie something like red/amber/green based on google mapping/or punching in daily altitude profiles. I guess everyone's a bit different though.

Jon
rossn - on 30 Jan 2013
In reply to Fishrubb: Thank you very much for that.

RN
Annoying Twit - on 01 Feb 2013
In reply to Fishrubb:

One thing is that the app has white text against a mountain scene background. In very good viewing conditions, I could read the text fully, but some white words over snow features, e.g. 'ascend' on the scoring screen, did not contrast sufficiently with the background. I also couldn't zoom the text.

Given that I have difficulty reading Kindle books outside in sunny conditions even though the Kindle app has higher contrast and a plain background, I'd be concerned about the readability of the text in mountain conditions.

If the user clicks on 'next' before answering a question, then they seem to score zero for that question. I'm slightly concerned that an accidental double press of the 'next' button, skipping a question, would give an erroneously low score. Could the app be changed so that the user cannot click on next until they have answered the question. Or at least there could be a warning on the last page mentioning that questions have been skipped and the real score could be as high as X.

Also, the final score screen is a single screen which asks the user to check the score down the bottom. For these kinds of tests it's usual for them to show different final screens depending on the score obtained, so that different feedback is given for different levels of risk. Particularly for higher levels of risk, Flashing red lights or another analogies may help reinforce the danger and importance of the result.

I hope I haven't been too critical here. In my professional life I often end up having to give critical analyses of student work of this sort, so I may have inappropriately been too detailed in my criticism. If so, please see username for explanation.
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jonesieboy on 08 Feb 2013
In reply to Fishrubb:

Great idea. I've shared the link on FB. I must say though that when I think back to alpine trips with a hut stay, most of them would have rated me at least 4. Poor sleep, reduced appetite and feeling knackered seem to feature pretty regularly!

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