/ Coast to Coast

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La Shamster on 30 Jan 2013
I'm planning to do the C2C solo in September and was looking for a recommendation for as guide book that covers the route and hints and tips re: accomodation. Is the Wainwright guide the best or are there any others worth a try?

Thanks,
La Sham
Darren Jackson - on 30 Jan 2013
In reply to La Shamster:

I used an updated edition of the AW guide in conjunction with the 2 Harveys strip maps. Backpacked it over 10 days. It's a great walk.
La Shamster on 30 Jan 2013
In reply to Darren Jackson:

Sounds good thanks. Harveys Strip maps??
robert_siddaway on 30 Jan 2013
In reply to La Shamster:

These are the Harvey maps: http://www.harveymaps.co.uk/acatalog/Coast_to_Coast_Path.html
It shows the route and a couple of km either side; they were sufficient when I did it.
La Shamster on 30 Jan 2013
In reply to robert_siddaway:

Cheers Rob!
Darren Jackson - on 30 Jan 2013
In reply to La Shamster:

Yes, if you merely need to know the route, then the strip maps are perfectly sufficient in themselves. I enjoyed complementing the maps with AW's narrative, too. As the originator of the route, his words gave things a bit of an extra dimension.... As did the words of Hemingway. I read Death in the Afternoon when I walked the C2C. I could have done without that particular narrative; especially when I found myself passing through a field of bulls in west Cumbria.
La Shamster on 30 Jan 2013
In reply to Darren Jackson:

>>sniggers<< are you recommending that as C2C reading material?
Lankyman - on 30 Jan 2013
In reply to Darren Jackson:
> (In reply to La Shamster)
>
> Yes, if you merely need to know the route, then the strip maps are perfectly sufficient in themselves.

You may wish to consider the larger area given by the OS maps? I've come across quite a few 'navigationally challenged' parties well off-route but still trying to make their surroundings fit their strip map. It's also useful to have a broader picture of the surroundings in case you need to make a detour eg bad weather escape routes or search for accommodation (can be thin on the ground in parts).
robert_siddaway on 30 Jan 2013
In reply to Darren Jackson:

I enjoyed complementing the maps with AW's narrative, too. As the originator of the route, his words gave things a bit of an extra dimension.

Yes, I did that too. Wonderful writer...
Dave Perry - on 02 Feb 2013
In reply to La Shamster:

Stick with the two Harvey maps. You've got around 5km on either side of the route for most of the way. They give much the same information as the OS maps including the fp & bridleway information anyway, so smallish detours are still possible and you are not going to be that far out on your nav are you?
Carolyn - on 02 Feb 2013
In reply to Dave Perry:

> and you are not going to be that far out on your nav are you?

Just remember to turn left up Loft Beck after Black Sail, plenty don't ;-)
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Kelloggs77 on 03 Feb 2013
In reply to La Shamster:

I am a C2C veteran, done it several times, some long 12 day crossings and others short speed routes.

Let me provide you with some sound advice - never use strip maps. We are blessed in this country to have O/S, hence why would you not use them. Te best guide book is by Martin Wainwright (no relation) and can be bought here:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Coast-Walk-Recreational-Path-Guides/dp/1845134672/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid... (there seems to be a price error on screen, however you know which one to look for elsewhere).

The book contains O/S maps for the routes and the high-level alternative routes should you fancy them.

Should you need any advise on route, schedule, places to stay or eat then by all means let me know.No point all this experience going to waste :-)

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