/ Horseshoe quarry

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Rhi Rhi - on 13 Feb 2013
Just wondering if anyone has made it to horseshoe quarry (peak district) recently and if they can tell me what the rock is like...heard it can be unstable in some places...? and what condition the bolts are particularly on the lower graded stuff i.e. the slabs..?
Looking to take out 2 people who have not done much outdoors

Thanks!
snoop6060 - on 13 Feb 2013
In reply to Rhi Rhi:

The low graded stuff on the left side is largely a pile of rubbish. Literally in some cases.

The main wall is pretty solid and has a few decent routes that are a good length. You'd be better on there, even if it means top roping if the grades are a bit above what you're looking for. You can walk around and set up a top rope no probs.
Bulls Crack - on 13 Feb 2013
In reply to Rhi Rhi:

There's quite a good long, low edge of very good rock a short distance away ;-)
Coel Hellier - on 13 Feb 2013
In reply to Rhi Rhi:

I wouldn't take beginners to Horseshoe unless they can second sport 6b, there are much better venues for lower-grade climbers. The solid stuff at Horseshoe is fairly steep and polished and sustained. If you want Limestone, Harborough Rocks is better for those new to the outdoors, and then there's loads of grit.
Ava Adore - on 13 Feb 2013
In reply to Rhi Rhi:

I'd agree with Coel. There's short stuff up top which is easier but it's not very interesting.
tnewmark - on 13 Feb 2013
In reply to Rhi Rhi: I'm also interested in this. Going to the peak this weekend and was planning on going to horseshoe quarry for some sport climbing.

Wondering if there are any other better places in the peak for sport climbing. Looking specifically to lead sport climb, rather than top rope.

And sorry, hope I haven't hijacked your thread!

Cheers, Tom
winhill - on 13 Feb 2013
In reply to Ava Adore:
> (In reply to Rhi Rhi)
>
> I'd agree with Coel. There's short stuff up top which is easier but it's not very interesting.

You mean the West side? That's exactly where I was going to recommend!

Depends what you want from the day really but up there you can get a lot done in a shorter period of time, you can set up top ropes by walking up, do loads of different techniques and skills, then go down later on to put them into practice.

Bearing in mind that people tend to (a) drop a few grades and (b) be ponderously slow first time out, anything that reduces the faff is good.
Bulls Crack - on 13 Feb 2013
In reply to winhill:

Problem is that most Peak sport below 6b is worse than going to a wall
Chris the Tall - on 13 Feb 2013
In reply to Rhi Rhi:
Whilst it's fashionable to knock Horseshoe, I don't think it's as bad as people make out. Bolts are generably in good condition - many have been replaced either by the BMC or Gary Gibson.

Rock stability varies, the right hand side of the slabs is fine, but more care is needed on the left and particularly the newly excavated routes in the centre. Plus, identifying and climbing friable rock is an important skill to develop. Just make sure you wear a helmet, especially for belaying

Mind you, with the weather the way it is in Sheffield at the moment, I'd be making plans to visit one of the walls !
outtathaway - on 13 Feb 2013
In reply to Rhi Rhi: If you can set up a top rope in a trad venue would say Froggatt be a better bet? In this weather it's not exposed and there are quite a few easier routes to go at. I can't imagine there'd be an issue with top roping at this time of year as you don't get the crowds. It'd just be so much nicer than going to Horseshoe.
Jon Stewart - on 13 Feb 2013
In reply to Bulls Crack:
> (In reply to winhill)
>
> Problem is that most Peak sport below 6b is worse than going to a wall

I'd go further.

Problem is that most Peak sport below 6b is worse than going down a well.
Rhi Rhi - on 13 Feb 2013
In reply to Rhi Rhi:

Really appreciate all this help guys! :) Thanks very much!
morley.10 - on 13 Feb 2013
Harper hill.
Enty - on 13 Feb 2013
In reply to Bulls Crack:
> (In reply to Rhi Rhi)
>
> There's quite a good long, low edge of very good rock a short distance away ;-)

Shhhhhhhhsh!

E
Rhi Rhi - on 14 Feb 2013
In reply to morley.10:

have you recently been to harpur hill? Is this a better option for my party? :)
Chris the Tall - on 14 Feb 2013
In reply to Rhi Rhi:
Not at this time of year, probably not at any time of the year for that matter !
Alex@home - on 14 Feb 2013
In reply to Rhi Rhi:
> (In reply to morley.10)
>
> have you recently been to harpur hill? Is this a better option for my party? :)

not in the winter. fairly high, mostly north facing and exposed to all the weather going. it can be pretty grim up there.
if you're taking newbies out then sport in the peak doesn't really work. you'd be much better off going to harborough for limestone or windgather for grit. both have loads of easy routes which you could lead and they could second in turn. and none of the routes are long so won't take ages to climb. that way you all get to do more climbing in a nicer place and you don't get the toproping police shouting at you from behind their keyboards.
HB1 - on 14 Feb 2013
In reply to Rhi Rhi: Contrary to some UKCers Harpur has some interesting routes in the 6a/6b range and is well worth a visit, probably in the afternoon, late spring and summer. NOT at the moment!
ads.ukclimbing.com
pec on 14 Feb 2013
In reply to Rhi Rhi: Basically Harpur Hill is a place where people who can already climb go when the focus of their activity is soley about sport climbing at a particular grade and there's nowhere better to go which there isn't really unless you can climb 6c/7a ish. The easy routes are choss and the rest are too hard for beginners (unless they're very talented) and offer a style of climbing which is rather non intuitive, i.e. there aren't many nice holds.

If you want to put them off, take them to Harpur Hill otherwise take them somewhere like Aldery Cliff if you want limestone or otherwise climb on grit.

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