/ 10k run but messed up training

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flopsicle - on 28 Feb 2013
I'm open to opinion on this. I started running to get fitter for climbing at the back end of Nov (also packed up smoking at the same time).

Initially I was running 2 or 3 times a week on a 2 mile route with a flppin' big hill. I did some much longer runs after about a month but as they were X country, on clay mud and hills the distance was both impossible to measure and ever so slightly irrelevant. I tried some flat running to get a gauge for where I was at but messed up my clothing, was cold and mind numbingly bored. I ran 3 miles, didn't doubt I could have gone round again but was far too bored and cold.

I find that I've been happier on tough ground, hills, mud, anything that keeps my head in it, where as on the flat I feel sapped and unmotivated.

Anyway along the way I entered a 10k which is now on Sunday. Over the last 3 weeks I've hardly run at all just due to timing, wanting to climb more and (if I'm honest) the freezing wind.

I'm in 2 minds whether to dump the 10K due to lack of prep or show up and see how it goes?

Generally speaking I'm not prone to injury and get away with doing daft stuff, at 42 I've done a lot of daft stuff so this is a statement from experience, however I fully realise that eventually age catches up even if I do feel as though I have daft stuff left in me. I've always been very active and 'feel' as though there's a weird residual fitness from years working a physical job many moons ago. I would not run through real pain, I'd stop.

It's all paid for, my number has arrived, care for my daughter is arranged, I can just turn up and play it by ear. I would appreciate the thoughts of those with more running experience though, I'd rather it inspire me again than snap me!
ThunderCat - on 28 Feb 2013
In reply to flopsicle:

I've only started running...know what you mean about the boredom.

I've signed up for my first 10k run in a few months, the Bupa 10K Manchester one, just to feel what the atmoshpere is like and to be among so many thousand people.

My reckoning is that even if worst comes to worst, I could walk it in 2 hours and have a beer at the end...

TheDrunkenBakers - on 28 Feb 2013
In reply to flopsicle:

Good luck with the 10K.

Im doing my first in a few weeks - lincoln 10k - and having been running for a good while now, the dreaded stitch keeps getting to me.

i would say just do it and have a good couple of weeks running. you may find that the buzz of the day gives you that little bit extra.
Steve John B - on 28 Feb 2013
In reply to flopsicle: Just do it, you'll be fine. Take it steady in the knowledge that if it's your first one it'll be a PB, and whatever happens you'll be able to beat it next time round!
Simon Cahill - on 28 Feb 2013
In reply to flopsicle: Go for it! I have done varying amounts of running over the years and recognise a lot of what you are saying. Your 10k would probably be on the dull side (in your opinion) if it was a training run, however the event atmosphere and running alongside others will make up for a lot. Regarding the distance 3 miles on the muddy hills and having something left is not a to bad a place to be in. The secrete is GO OUT SLOWLY, did you hear GO OUT SLOWLY, you will get faster or remain the same towards the end, if you go out fast you will burn and suffer. Why not set yourself a realistic goal, say finish in 1hr 10 mins, you won't be finishing last! That give you 7 minutes per km or if you feel like it say an hour at 6 min / km. Make sure the first 5km take at least the 6 or 7 minutes each, if you feel great push up a little bit from there but not much, if you still feel great 8km then go for it. If you don't feel great keep to your times and it will work out fine for your original plan.

Good luck
tony on 28 Feb 2013
In reply to flopsicle:

10k isn't very far, so if you don't try to run it fast, it's unlikely you'll do yourself any serious damage. On the other hand, it doesn't sound like you're very enthusiastic about it, and if you think you're underprepared (which you probably are), I'm not sure you'll get very much out of it, and if you don't think you can do yourself justice, you might come away from it feeling even less motivated to run.

I would have thought a better way to proceed, if you do want to do more running, would be to dump this particular race, and do some more training, to a level where you feel more inspired and motivated. If you prefer hill runs and mud, aim for that kind of race, rather than a flat road race. That will give you a target you're actually interested in. You'll also need to make yourself run a bit more in training. At this time of year it's very easy to find reasons/excuses not to run, so you do have put yourself through a bit of discomfort to get on wet and windy days (but once you get going, it's rarely as bad as you think it's going to be).

As for the age thing - I'm 52 and running better than I was 10 years ago. One of the best runners in our club improved gradually through his 40s and is one of the best hillrunners for his age in Scotland. At 42, you've got plenty of time.
bobmalaria - on 28 Feb 2013
In reply to flopsicle:

I totally get your problem. I absolutely hate running on streets/ on streets at night. I much prefer doing cross/fell running because there is always something new to see (nature, copulating dogs/cows ;) ).

For the more boring runs get yourself a mp3-player, load it with your favourite music to keep your mind busy.

I am pretty sure that you can do a 10k. Just set yourself a realistic finish time and don't be disappointed if you go over by a few minutes. Take it as an experience, I'm sure you will like the atmosphere on the race day.

Maybe doing the run is a trigger for you to train properly for the next one, improve your time, etc.

An injury is, in my opinion, very unlikely. I mean, if you get too tired to run, then just walk a little bit and start running again when you feel like it.

I did the Manchester 10k a few years back. found it very expensive and crowded. it is a nice run if you like seeing hairy blokes in ballerina costumes though. the finish at Deansgate is also great but I was on to run my personal best and was road-blocked a couple times by large groups of runners. Still a fun run, but the entry price is through the roof...
MikeTS - on 28 Feb 2013
In reply to flopsicle:
I'm 20 yrs older than you an doing 10K tomorrow. Also undertrained. But anyone at all fit can run 10ks in an event. Firat, the adrenaline of an event moves you along. Second, take it easy: walk a bit if you need to use different muscles.
alooker - on 28 Feb 2013
In reply to flopsicle: anyone with reasonable fitness could do a 10k with negligible chance of injury I daresay. If it does get too much just run a bit slower or even walk.
flopsicle - on 28 Feb 2013
It seems on balance that going for it pretty much has the consensus. It's an off road run but round a country park in the burbs so I suspect it'll be well tracked, totally not a fell run!

I have thought about more adventurous running but feel that until I've actually felt the distance on the day with something simpler I wouldn't have the bottle. When I go 'playing' in the woods I please myself, take whatever track I fancy and stay out till I know I'm not walking a few strides before running again but walking 'cos I'm done. I've even stopped to play on rope swings!

In a way I like not taking it seriously because I like the freedom. While I like the though of running in wilder places the ability to map read (my lack of it!), the care needed to be basically sensible and the complete lack of knowing anyone else who does it has meant it's stayed just a thought.

I thought of this:
http://xrunner.co.uk/events/water-wipeout/

Just for the silliness, no-one I know has been persuaded to do it with me and I think I'd need a normal 10k under my belt to get me to finally hit the button. Mind you it isn't sold out yet....

On another note, I won't have ground support from anyone on Sunday (except the organised drinks etc). I was thinking of wearing a running T, long running bottoms, usual trainers (bog standard nikes)and my running soft shell which stuffs into it's own pocket to carry - plus a pair of gloves which fit in same pocket. Forecast is between 5 - 7, some chance of light rain, not much wind. I wasn't going to take water as I'm presuming they have tables with that. Does that sound reasonable?
The New NickB - on 28 Feb 2013
In reply to flopsicle:

Don't over dress. 5-7 degrees will feel warm once you are moving. How fast do you think you will do it in?
tony on 28 Feb 2013
In reply to flopsicle:
>
> On another note, I won't have ground support from anyone on Sunday (except the organised drinks etc). I was thinking of wearing a running T, long running bottoms, usual trainers (bog standard nikes)and my running soft shell which stuffs into it's own pocket to carry - plus a pair of gloves which fit in same pocket. Forecast is between 5 - 7, some chance of light rain, not much wind. I wasn't going to take water as I'm presuming they have tables with that. Does that sound reasonable?

That's more than I'd be wearing. Personally, for those temperatures, I'd be in shorts and t-shirt (or possibly a long-sleeved top).

I wouldn't bother with water unless you think you're going to take well over an hour.
The New NickB - on 28 Feb 2013
In reply to flopsicle:

Some 10k events have a water station at half way, a lot just have water at the end. You don't need it during the race.
ruttingstag on 28 Feb 2013
In reply to flopsicle: if youve only been running since November then you wont have got the running bug yet. Give it another three to six months, run more often and run faster and when you get fitter you will enjoy running more and not be bored by it. There are always bad days, but there are days when you feel you are feeling swift like an animal, doing something simple which is what youre body is designed to do. It just takes a bit of training and perseverence to get to that stage.
Enter the 10k, if anything it will give you a kick up the ass to train harder for the next one.

p.s you need to run through pain though, thats what makes a runner - they choose pain.
flopsicle - on 28 Feb 2013
I did 5.2k in 35 mins so anything around 1hr 10 would be fine for me.
Run_Ross_Run - on 28 Feb 2013
In reply to flopsicle:

Just do it.

Use it as a training exercise if nothing else.

Just enjoy it and use the experience to gain knowledge on the logistics of the races, how you feel with the clothing you wear, fluid intake and refuelling etc.

You`ll gain more than you can loose, just take it easy(ish).

jkarran - on 28 Feb 2013
In reply to flopsicle:

> It's all paid for, my number has arrived, care for my daughter is arranged, I can just turn up and play it by ear. I would appreciate the thoughts of those with more running experience though, I'd rather it inspire me again than snap me!

I'd just do it at a pace you're comfortable with and enjoy taking part. Even if you were fitter you'd still have to manage your pace to match your fitness, the only real difference is exactly where in the mid-field you'll finish.

jk
flopsicle - on 28 Feb 2013
In reply to ruttingstag:

> p.s you need to run through pain though, thats what makes a runner - they choose pain.

TBH if I'm up for it then I'm up for it, but it's in a level country park so I can't see myself getting that wrapped up in it. I honestly doubt I'm late flowering marathon material.

I quite like a short run in the morning, I enjoy doing better than before but although I like the will power of 'my' hill, I also enjoy down, it's the variety I miss on the flat and could not see myself ever really getting it.
flopsicle - on 28 Feb 2013
I need an edit button!

OK - I'll wear less, if my boobs freeze off I'll post back that you were all nuts! :))
flopsicle - on 03 Mar 2013
Did it! T shirt was sound advice but I ran in longs for the pockets. I was a straggler at 1h 8m but at least I ran. Thanks all..
wobble - on 03 Mar 2013
In reply to flopsicle:

Well done flopsicle and thanks for posting this,,,
Given me a bit of inspiration to get out running this week. Like yourself I prefer running in the mud so I better get going before spring kicks in.
Uluru on 03 Mar 2013
In reply to flopsicle: Well done:)

Wobble here is some inspiration if you need some. At Bath Half today the World Record was broken in the over 60's category. A man by the name of Martin Rees ran the course in 1:11:29! Amazing
Steve John B - on 03 Mar 2013
In reply to flopsicle:
> Did it!

Nice one!
wobble - on 03 Mar 2013
In reply to uluru:

I read that as 1.11 for 10k at first which had me a little confused,,
flopsicle - on 03 Mar 2013
In reply to wobble: that would have made me feel better! God I was slow. I wasn't out of breath though and as I only quit the fags end of nov that could have been worse, plenty round me were puffing like trains.

And I learned not to eat prumes for brekky, make sure I have safety pins and that the tshirts might be free but the soup isn't.

Haven't decided whether to do another but I might.

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