/ 10k, half, full & ultra marathon entry Endurancelife Exmoor CTS

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Bert - on 09 Apr 2013
I am selling my place on the Half marathon Endurancelife Coastal Trail Series, Exmoor. The ticket can be changed for 10k, marathon or ultra marathon.

This ticket cost 39 and the race is now completely sold out, frustratingly I am unable to go due to my work load this weekend. I am hoping to get half my money back but am open to sensible offers.

I have checked with the Endurancelife website, the ticket is able to be transfered easily to another individual. (unfortunately I missed the deadline to get a refund)

There are 4 races on the day, a 10k, half marathon, full marathon and ultra marathon. This ticket is completely tranferable between the races (there is a small additional cost payable to endurance life if changed onto the marathon or ultra marathon. Free to change to the 10k. This fee is nothing to do with me, it is done easily either on the day or through the event website).

I did the Dorset half marathon in this series before christmas, these are excellent events, really good atmosphere and very well organised. At the start of the race you are given a free technical t-shirt and energy gel. At the end you were given a medal and a protien bar, and also your personal race time. There were also plenty of drinks stations that had sweets too on the last one too

See the link below for full details
http://www.endurancelife.com/event-new.asp?series=70&location=178

My partner also has a place on the 10k that she would be willing to sell, since I'm not going. All the details above apply to this ticket too, it is transferable to the other races again at a small additional cost payable to endurance life.
Bert - on 09 Apr 2013
In reply to Bert: bump
Wonrek - on 09 Apr 2013
In reply to Bert: Good luck with moving the place on. Have you tried offering it on the various running pages on Facebook?

Sorry I'm not interested myself as I'm already entered to do the Ultra, good luck trying to sell it and if I hear of anyone interested I'll let you know.

Have you done it before, it's an amazing course shame you're going to miss it!
Bert - on 09 Apr 2013
In reply to Wonrek: Hi there,
Thanks for that, I'll give it a try.
I'm gutted about not being able to make it, I did the Dorset one in December and it was fantastic.
I noticed that you said you had signed up for the Ultra marathon. How do you progress to be able to run an Ultra marathon? My max so far is 16 miles
IainRUK - on 09 Apr 2013
In reply to Bert: run more..

But an ultra is anything >26.2

If you can run a marathon... you can run an ultra.. its essentially housekeeping then..

It was strange the other day i was running 6:55 min miles for 40 miles.. suddenly over 3 miles my pace dropped to 7:30 min miles.. and I held that for another 20..

Maybe it was just a switch to fat burning.. I don't know.. but it was sudden. I was then quite pleased to be able to sit at 7:30 Ok.. but when I pushed it back to 7:00 for the last lap it really felt like I was pushing it.. yet for 40 miles sub 7 was comfortable..
Bert - on 09 Apr 2013
In reply to IainRUK: I've never tried a marathon yet.

I only started running again last year. My aim is to do a marathon before the years out. At the minute I'm training very little because of a lack of time, but am still managing half marathons occasionally.

Maybe next year for the ultra marathons
Bert - on 09 Apr 2013
In reply to Bert: bump
IainRUK - on 09 Apr 2013
In reply to Bert: Look at running quick first.. we're only young once..
Wonrek - on 10 Apr 2013
In reply to Bert: Agree with Iain that speed is more important than many ultra runners give credit to.

If you max speed is 7 30 minute mining than you'd run an ultra at 70% (ish) of max. If you grind away useless mileage in training and neglect speed work sessions then a natural progression of that is your max speed de reading.

If the max speed decreases then your 70% of max will also go down the swanny too. I learnt that the hard way and have spent te winter literally 'picking up the pace'

That and an extreme dose of stupidity, stubbornness and insomnia all help with becoming an ultra runner ;-)

<morning Iain :-)>
Bert - on 10 Apr 2013
In reply to Wonrek: Ok, so it is worth me working on my speed first before the distance stuff. I'm assuming interval training is the best way to do this?

I've never interval trained before.
IainRUK - on 10 Apr 2013
In reply to Bert: Run more...

Intervals help.. but upping the mileage is the main thing..

You can add distance later. But I like to mix my season, 1-2 ultras then lots of shorter races.
Wonrek - on 10 Apr 2013
In reply to IainRUK:
> (In reply to Bert) Run more...
>
> Intervals help.. but upping the mileage is the main thing..

Disagree. It's very easy to fall into the junk miles trap. Total miles is one side of things but yeah you can go out four days a week, 20 miles a session never pushing or moving forward.

Break it down to a mix of quality and distance sessions if you want to go straight down the ultra road. Otherwse have fun with different distances along the way.

Quality would be short structured sessions, the ones that most of s cn hoe horn into weekdays where we don't have all day to run sadly. Hill reps (my personal favourite) intervals (yuck!) and if it's possible track running can also bring benefits.

I run ultras now but for a while I concentrated on halfs nd getting the best I could there.

For the majority of us speed will suffer as distance increases, unless you're one of the 'lucky' ones :-)

<evening Iain>
Bert - on 11 Apr 2013
In reply to Wonrek: Thanks for the tips, will look into it
Bert - on 11 Apr 2013
In reply to Bert: Exmoor CTS places are still available if anyone wants them
Bert - on 11 Apr 2013
In reply to Bert: bump
IainRUK - on 11 Apr 2013
In reply to Wonrek: I don't know..

Too many confuse LSD.. as long slow.. which it isn't.. its long steady.. but shouldn't be way off marathon pace.

I don't think there is such a thing as junk miles as long as you have key sessions in there..

I'd also say 70% of marathon pace, did you say that earlier? is too low. I'm about 85% for 100k..

But my break throughs came when I started doing more running.. less hill walking.. almost all miles 7:30 or below.. my marathon pace is 6:05 ish.. and then my long runs at 6:30-6:50 pace.. finishing at marathon pace..

I do reps, not so much hill reps but now do longer reps, so 3 x 2km is a favourite session now.

If you did 4 x 20 miles not pushing you wouldn't/ You'd also probably get injured. Low montony is crucial.

In my week I have my long run of 18-22 miles, then a midweek long run of 12-15 miles.. sometimes longer.. then a tempo and then reps.. 4 key runs then just run around those 4 sessions..

BUt I think my two long runs make the biggest difference. BUt I do push quite hard in long runs..





Steff - on 12 Apr 2013
In reply to IainRUK:

> BUt I think my two long runs make the biggest difference. BUt I do push quite hard in long runs..

I don't deliberately push hard in long runs, but often find that after the first hour, which is hard work, that I feel more comfortable at a faster pace. "Cruising speed" seems to get faster for the first 3 hours of a long run.
It's easy to thunk that slowing down needs to be proportional to distance, but I think going too slow is actually harder. It changes bio-mechanics and all sorts of things feel unnatural. I feel this sometimes when I run with a slower friend quite new to running. What I plan in as recovery runs actually tires me out much more than a slightly faster steady pace run.
IainRUK - on 12 Apr 2013
In reply to Steff: I get IT issues when I run slowly, and its supposedly quite common, because its no longer your natural gait..
Wonrek - on 12 Apr 2013
In reply to IainRUK:
> (In reply to Wonrek)

> Too many confuse LSD.. as long slow.. which it isn't.. its long steady.. but shouldn't be way off marathon pace.

Agreed, but some of us have a slow marathon pace anyways ;-)

>
> I don't think there is such a thing as junk miles as long as you have key sessions in there..
Which is what I was saying, going out with a purpose as opposed to a distance on all your runs just turns them into junk miles as you're not targeting any particular area for improvement. Distance shouldn't be ignored but if that's your only goal of every run then speed will never improve.
> I'd also say 70% of marathon pace, did you say that earlier? is too low. I'm about 85% for 100k..
I'm still getting there....first 100k next month.
> But my break throughs came when I started doing more running.. less hill walking.. almost all miles 7:30 or below.. my marathon pace is 6:05 ish.. and then my long runs at 6:30-6:50 pace.. finishing at marathon pace..
And I'm so glad of people like you to be able to clap me over the line when I get there lol. Are these road times you're quoting, surely a little slower on tough trails?
> I do reps, not so much hill reps but now do longer reps, so 3 x 2km is a favourite session now.
Living in Cornwall we don't have anywhere quite that high, I do hill circuits around the valley which provides a good mix of long steady and short sharp gradients.

> If you did 4 x 20 miles not pushing you wouldn't/ You'd also probably get injured. Low montony is crucial.
>
> In my week I have my long run of 18-22 miles, then a midweek long run of 12-15 miles.. sometimes longer.. then a tempo and then reps.. 4 key runs then just run around those 4 sessions..
Very similar to my training except that I've got family commitments that mean I've had to drop some extra runs and replace with a cross trainer session.
>
> BUt I think my two long runs make the biggest difference. BUt I do push quite hard in long runs..

:-D

robthered - on 12 Apr 2013
Sorry Bert - not after a ticket, racing the 10k.

Iain - just out of interest, what sort of pace (or how long does it take) for your 2k in your 3x2k sessions? I know the answer is 'all out' but was interested in what that might be for a runner such as yourself?

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