/ How protective over your images should you be?

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richprideaux - on 08 May 2013
I suppose the answer to that is dependant on the individual...

Spotted one of my photos (a snap from a day in the hills featuring that person, not an image I spent any real length of time in creating) being used on a friend's personal website.

In the long run I don't care, and if they asked I would have given them a hi-res copy (this one pinched from FB I think) and it isn't something worth falling out over. However, should you always ask, even if it is just a snap taken by a friend?
r0x0r.wolfo - on 08 May 2013
In reply to richprideaux: Too far, if he's a friend and the guy in the picture. Tell him you're flattered he likes your work and give him a high res? Are you a professional?
richprideaux - on 08 May 2013
In reply to r0x0r.wolfo:

In this case I'm not pursuing it as it isn't worth damaging a friendship over. I'm not a professional photographer, but the website is in competition with my own business.

I'm more interested in opinions about where you draw the line with use of images - if it is a professional work then you should be protective of it, but a quick snap is fair game?
Trangia - on 08 May 2013
In reply to richprideaux:

Out of curiousity how do you claim "ownership" of a picture? You take a shot of a friend climbing on your camera then it's obviously yours, but say you take one of the friend climbing on their camera at their request. Whose picture is it? You are the photographer, but it's their camera.....
richprideaux - on 08 May 2013
In reply to Trangia:

I've also wondered about this... Personally in that case I would say it was theirs...
What Goes Up - on 08 May 2013
In reply to Trangia: The person taking the photo owns the copyright. In principle it might be harder to prove that you took it if it was on their camera, in amongst shots that they did take themselves, but then if they're actually in th photo in question it would probably quite tricky for them to claim that they took it as well (disregarding options like remote triggers etc).
Bob_the_Builder - on 08 May 2013
In reply to Trangia:

That's a good point, my photos all get uploaded with a watermark copyright to me, but of course some of them are taken by others on my camera and presumably aren't mine legally. Though if someone were to ask that I didn't do that of course we could sort it out as only my friends use my camera!

To the OP, I have no problem with friends taking my photos for personal use, especially if it is of them, but I do appreciate them asking.

If the website is a direct competitor to you it seems quite rude to take the image without asking, but if they're your friend its probably not worth getting excited over. If you are upset its worth mentioning politely though. Always best to be open with mates!
Chalk - on 09 May 2013
In reply to richprideaux: I often think people worry too much about protecting their images. If your making money from them then it's a different story but for those of us who do it as a hobby, the chance of someone stealing it is very slim and if they do then the chances are you will never know. It would be nice to be asked of course, but if someone thought my work was good enough to use for themselves then id be happy just knowing that.


TryfAndy on 10 May 2013
In reply to Chalk:

The problem is when those who use said images get used to using them for free & without repercussion, and start stealing (yes, it is stealing) income from those of us who do it for a living.
Chalk - on 10 May 2013
In reply to TryfAndy: For people who sell images then I completely agree that you need to protect them and i'm not saying it's right for others to use them without asking. But I just find it a bit odd that so many hobby photographers are plastering their work with watermarks so others can't use them. The chance of someone actually stealing it is very slim and even if they did i'm not sure it would really make any difference?
The Pylon King on 10 May 2013
In reply to Chalk:
> But I just find it a bit odd that so many hobby photographers are plastering their work with watermarks so others can't use them.

and its not exactly hard to remove a watermark!
The Pylon King on 10 May 2013
In reply to What Goes Up:
> (In reply to Trangia) The person taking the photo owns the copyright.

I am pretty sure that a professional photographer told me once that whoever owns the camera, owns the photo but i did always wonder about that.
The Pylon King on 10 May 2013
In reply to richprideaux:

It really pisses me off when friends use my pics without asking, i think its very presumptuous, however i would always say yes if they asked.
TryfAndy on 13 May 2013
In reply to The Pylon King:

You're not the only one, I get a little miffed about that too.
I put some images on FB, unwatermarked as they've got no commercial value, from a Coast-to-Coast MTB trip last week that I did the support team for. I've now noticed that the employer of one of the participants has re-uploaded my photo to their FB page, with not even a credit or any note as to who took it.
I'm not going to issue a take-down & invoice, as that would be petty & inappropriate due to how much support the business provided to the C2C itself, but it does annoy me somewhat and makes me wish I'd flung a simple watermark on each one.
Marek - on 13 May 2013
In reply to TryfAndy:
> (In reply to The Pylon King)
>
<SNIP>
> I'm not going to issue a take-down & invoice, as that would be petty & inappropriate due to how much support the business provided to the C2C itself, but it does annoy me somewhat and makes me wish I'd flung a simple watermark on each one.

A reasonable alternative for you would be to ask them to credit you (as they should have done) and see what happens. If they apologise and add the credit then honour restored. If not then you may not feel so forgiving.

Doing nothing simply encourages more of this unsocial behaviour in the future. You may not care too much and shrug your shoulders, but for others its a more serious issue and it shouldn't be encouraged - even passively
Timmd on 13 May 2013
In reply to richprideaux:

I think where it's a picture of themselves, people can be forgiven for not asking because it's of them (imo), they're bound to think 'Cool a nice picture of me' I think and put it on their site, but for everything else I think it's only polite to ask.

I guess i'd ask for it to be credited. With some people that would prompt them to ask another time, and if not at least you'll be getting it credited to you.

TryfAndy on 13 May 2013
In reply to Marek:

Oh, don't get me wrong, in the past I've been horrendously aggressive with those who infringe on my copyright. I probably should do in this case too & avoid the hypocrisy, but for some reason it doesn't seem right. I'll have a word with them & see if I can at least get credited.

On a related note, it must have escaped from my Fb using the 'share' function. I used to have it disabled on all my photos, but someone asked me to turn it on for something rather amusing a while ago & I forgot to block sharing again after. Now I can't work out how to stop it apart from selecting it on each damn photo. Is there a bulk way of doing it?

Wiley Coyote - on 13 May 2013
In reply to The Pylon King:
> (In reply to What Goes Up)
> [...]
>
> I am pretty sure that a professional photographer told me once that whoever owns the camera, owns the photo but i did always wonder about that.

Ownership of the camera has no bearing whatsoever on copyright. It is the 'author' who owns copyright unless otherwise agreed in advance. It can get complicated if someone sets up the shot and then has someone else press the shutter but in 99.9pc of cases it's the photographer pure and simple.
I will give people who co-operated in creating a shot free personal use but far too many people simple grab images these days so I usually complain and charge whenever and wherever I come across it if only to make the point that 'But it was on the internet' is not a licence to use an image.
Hannes on 14 May 2013
In reply to richprideaux: You should be protective, if anything to make sure your photos don't end up in a place like this: https://www.facebook.com/amysbakingco
ads.ukclimbing.com
Damo on 14 May 2013
In reply to Hannes:
> (In reply to richprideaux) ... a place like this: https://www.facebook.com/amysbakingco

That is awesome! :-)

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