/ Keeping climbing shoes fresh.

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.
danny_whew - on 09 May 2013
I sized down a few months back and even though I'm loving my Bandits, they have started to get a bit of a pong about them.

I've been using some spray to little effect, and I don't like all the chemicals in them, so I was wondering if anyone had any tips to keep climbing shoes smelling like rose.
idiotproof (Buxton MC) - on 09 May 2013
In reply to danny_whew:

wear thin socks
LionSJH - on 09 May 2013
In reply to danny_whew: I've seen, smelled, but not tried, these:

http://www.bananafingers.co.uk/boot-bananas-p-1654.html
Dino Dave - on 09 May 2013
In reply to danny_whew: I'm afraid Evolv shoes have a tendancy to pick up a bit of a pong! Defys are pretty bad but have ha no experience of the bandits. As of yet, I've heard of no successful remedy for the stench, so sorry about that. But have a free bump! :)
Queenie - on 09 May 2013
In reply to idiotproof (Buxton MC):
> (In reply to danny_whew)
>
> wear thin socks

Seconded.

Voltemands - on 09 May 2013
In reply to LionSJH: A pal of mine made some of these from an old dish cloth and a bunch of nice smelling herbs, he is now aloud to keep his boots in the house once again.
martinph78 on 09 May 2013
In reply to Queenie: thirded.

More mile running socks are 5 pairs for £8 on ebay. To thin for a running sock, so I use them for climbing. Just the job.
duchessofmalfi - on 09 May 2013
Wash them in a machine on 30 degrees - helps for a bit. Trainer balls also tame the stench a bit - enough to be worth it but they are easy to lose.
JohnnyW - on 09 May 2013
In reply to danny_whew:

Yep, thin socks. A no-brainer imo. I hate the feel of my sweaty feet against the leather......eugh!
Kieran_John - on 09 May 2013
In reply to danny_whew:

THe banana boots work fantastically, but usually only when they're used from new.
Haighy - on 09 May 2013
In reply to danny_whew:
Can't recommend the boot bananas highly enough! Am now even allowed the shoes in the bedroom rather than outside the house!
kjw1991 - on 09 May 2013
In reply to danny_whew: mine get hung on the washing line for a few hours after any climbing seems to keep them from stinking the house out
balmybaldwin - on 09 May 2013
In reply to danny_whew:

What ever you do, don't keep them in a bag or sealed in any way, make sure they can air.

I've heard of all sorts of remedies, but none are totally effective
Chris Aston - on 09 May 2013
In reply to danny_whew: wash them in sink then dry with news paper in them , works for a few weeks. or put in a bag and put in freezer for a couple of days that's meant to work but haven't tried it yet
Ciderslider - on 09 May 2013
In reply to danny_whew: +1 for boot bananas
3leggeddog on 10 May 2013
In reply to Ciderslider:

đont other with any of the peddled shite.

keep your soes clipped to the outside of your pack. ɣepp both your shoes and feet clean
paul__in_sheffield - on 10 May 2013
In reply to danny_whew: another vote for boot bananas, especially if you use the from the start with new shoes.
danny_whew - on 10 May 2013
In reply to danny_whew: thanks for all the advice, I'm not too keen on climbing in socks, personal preferance, so I think I'll get banannas ordered.
Muel - on 10 May 2013
In reply to danny_whew:

Be careful about drying them.

Wear thin socks! (Best thing I've done).

I use Oder Eaters spray as well, which seems to work very well.
needvert on 10 May 2013
In reply to danny_whew:

washing machine and clipping to outside of pack for me.

Washing machine doesn't seem to do any damage.
Simon Caldwell - on 11 May 2013
In reply to danny_whew:
> I'm not too keen on climbing in socks

Have you tried it?
It makes no difference at the punter end of the spectrum (and not a lot at the elite end judging by some photos of cutting edge climbers wearing socks!
martinph78 on 16 May 2013
In reply to Toreador: This, even the thinnest socks work to keep your shoes from stinking and you cant feel the difference as they are so thin.

I personally don't want my hot, sweaty feet spending the day in a bath of chemical sprays which probably weren't designed to be next to the skin (ie most people wear shoes and socks).
tprebs - on 16 May 2013
In reply to danny_whew:
+1 for the bananas. I found them much more effective than actual bananas...
bpmclimb - on 16 May 2013
In reply to idiotproof (Buxton MC):

Nothing wrong with wearing socks, of course. Nothing wrong with being a sub-extreme climber either. Can't help noting that the two tend to go together, though.

Simon Caldwell - on 16 May 2013
In reply to bpmclimb:

Good advice for the OP then
patrick_b - on 16 May 2013
In reply to Toreador:

Socks are the future. Tiny trainer socks avoid the '80s look but stop the vultures circling looking for the rotting carcass.

They make no difference in terms of sensitivity to the rock, at least up to E2.
bpmclimb - on 16 May 2013
In reply to patrick_b:
> (In reply to Toreador)
>
> Socks are the future. Tiny trainer socks avoid the '80s look but stop the vultures circling looking for the rotting carcass.
>
> They make no difference in terms of sensitivity to the rock, at least up to E2.


Different strokes for different folks, I suppose. Personally I like using very small footholds and smears, even on lower grade routes, and therefore I favour a pretty tight shoe for all routes - no room for socks.

If climbing a lower grade route on which I'd consider socks, I'd usually go the whole hog and do it in trainers.
bpmclimb - on 16 May 2013
In reply to Toreador:
> (In reply to bpmclimb)
>
> Good advice for the OP then

Possibly - unless you take the view that wearing socks under climbing shoes slows the development of good foot technique.
EeeByGum - on 16 May 2013
In reply to idiotproof (Buxton MC):
> (In reply to danny_whew)
>
> wear thin socks

Another vote for socks. Stops the shoe slipping around your foot if you have sweaty feet like me and keeps your feet warm in the winter.
grimtage - on 16 May 2013
In reply to danny_whew: Don't bother with the bananas, just use some tea bags, a few in each boot. Does exactly the same job.
999thAndy on 16 May 2013
In reply to bpmclimb:
If your boots are tight without socks, surely they'd be even tighter with socks?
At my best (E3/4) I wore socks and socks were definitely not the limiting factor
bpmclimb - on 16 May 2013
In reply to 999thAndy:
> (In reply to bpmclimb)
> If your boots are tight without socks, surely they'd be even tighter with socks?

Sorry - don't understand. I think you misinterpreted what I was saying, or perhaps I expressed myself badly. I like a tight shoe with no socks for a real feeling of contact with the rock, pretty much regardless of grade.

> At my best (E3/4) I wore socks and socks were definitely not the limiting factor

Well it would be a limiting factor for me, but we're all different!

Simon Caldwell - on 16 May 2013
In reply to bpmclimb:
Dave Macleod sometimes wears socks, I guess the fact that it's not always means it does make a difference. But possibly not to we punters :-)
thomb - on 16 May 2013
In reply to danny_whew:

I use diluted teatree oil in a little spray bottle. that and always leave boots in breathable (i.e. cloth, net) bags. seems to work well.
999thAndy on 16 May 2013
In reply to bpmclimb:

Sorry I assumed when you mentioned tight boots and good contact with the rock you were implying that looser boots were worse, from that I extrapolated to tighter boots would be better.

FWIW, my limiting factors are in decreasing order:

1. Head strength
2. Finger strength
3. Arm strength



jeffsheard on 16 May 2013
What do people think is happening in their climbing shoes?
You wear them without socks and peform exercise. They do not breathe because they are covered in rubber. They get loaded up with dead skin and bacteria.

WASH THEM you fools!

Just once every few months, squirt a bit of hand fabric washing liquid in there, fill with hot water and soak for a bit. Next, scrub like b*ggery with a long handled dish washing brush. Ooh and aah at the filth that comes out. Rinse a couple of times and dry with newspaper then radiator.

Hey presto, lovely boots. Super sticky rubber again too. The rubber might delaminate a bit at the edges but I've never had this happen to any meaningful extent.
martinph78 on 16 May 2013
In reply to jeffsheard: Or wear socks with them, and just chuck them in the washing machine every now and again. Simples.

alooker - on 17 May 2013
In reply to danny_whew: another vote for boot bananas, they'll salvage ones that haven't quite gone over the edge too
oscaig - on 17 May 2013
In reply to alooker:
Agree with the advice on airing out shoes after a session - particularly if they've gotten a bit sweaty in the process. Have tried a few chemical solutions, periodic washing etc but the best thing is really just to make sure that they're not sitting sealed up in your bag between trips but get aired out (sunny windowsill works well) - should see them right. :-)
ice.solo - on 17 May 2013
In reply to thomb:

Tea tree oil is the go. Eucalyptus maybe second. Good for the skin too.
A dilution of hydrogen peroxide works too.
jennym32 - on 17 May 2013
In reply to danny_whew:

I use homemade little bags that I presume are a bit like the banana things. I put some talculm powder + bicarbonate of soda in the end of some tights & tie them off with thread. Seems to work pretty well if you put them in straight after climbing. Though, as others have said about the bananas, definitely work better if you use them from new.
The Pylon King on 17 May 2013
In reply to bpmclimb:
> (In reply to idiotproof (Buxton MC))
>
> Nothing wrong with wearing socks, of course. Nothing wrong with being a sub-extreme climber either. Can't help noting that the two tend to go together, though.

Er, i dont think so!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N_Bx6lSIT3U
bpmclimb - on 17 May 2013
In reply to The Pylon King:
> (In reply to bpmclimb)
> [...]
>
> Er, i dont think so!
>

I said tend to, not always - there are exceptions!

Offwidth - on 17 May 2013
In reply to bpmclimb:

Modern thin sports socks will barely affect fit and will reduce stink. If you are working at the outer limits of foot placement, fair enough, but 99% of climbers are never there and even those who are, are not there all of the time. At your grades you're not close, so you're just a fashion victim ;-)

Bumblies like me (leading the odd extreme and rarely bouldering in the high F6 grades/ hard UK 6a and above) should be wearing thicker socks all the time: keeps shoes clean and keeps feet warm and the midges away from ankles.
The Pylon King on 17 May 2013
In reply to Offwidth:

Yes i agree, modern thin sports socks make no difference to performance.
bpmclimb - on 17 May 2013
In reply to Offwidth:
> (In reply to bpmclimb)
>
99% of climbers are never there and even those who are, are not there all of the time. At your grades you're not close, so you're just a fashion victim ;-)
>

Typically opinionated, black-and-white, dogmatic, I'd have to say. We're all different and get used to climbing in different ways. I've tried climbing in socks, and even with very thin ones I just don't feel the rock as much as I want - and this affects my performance. Just because this isn't true for you doesn't mean it can't be true for me.

Climbster - on 18 May 2013
In reply to danny_whew:

I find it helps to air them as much as poss, wash them from time to time and store them stuffed with old tights packed with odour absorbing cat-litter.



Offwidth - on 18 May 2013
In reply to bpmclimb:

"Typically opinionated, black-and-white, dogmatic, I'd have to say."

You would say though wouldn't you. I started off 25 years ago with no socks and my shoes reeked and despite washing shoes in the washing machine from time to time and airing them, the nasty slimy gunk that slowly built up caused them to rotate a bit, unless over-tightened, and the stench in the end was the main cause I threw a pair away.

An old duffer advised me to try them with socks and I found I could wear the shoes slightly less tight for the same performance and the shoes didnt stink and I could wear them to death and resole time after time for comfort mountaineering days. I can even keep 10 pairs in the same room without triggering Obama's chemical weapons clause in the UN.

More recently performance socks have got thinner and thinner taking even the disadvantage of lack of feel away. I can see how the very top performers when working hard might prefer to go without at times; Uk 6c upwards sort of stuff. Also a few folk are lucky as their feet dont sweat very much at all. However anyone not that lucky or at those lofty performance levels I'd challnge to sock it and see; if only because you cant agrgue the benfits of no socks unless you have tried them and found them worse.

Then of course there is the foot damage problem. Any podiatrist will explain why wearing over-tight shoes all the time will likly trash your feet causing painful bunions etc in old age.
xplorer on 20 May 2013
In reply to Offwidth:

"Typically opinionated, black-and-white, dogmatic, I'd have to say."

He is correct
Offwidth - on 20 May 2013
In reply to xplorer:

You would be god then to know that ?;-)

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.