/ What is the best wicking t-shirt/baselayer

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Bert - on 18 May 2013
Hi Guys,
I'm after some advice on the best wicking t-shirt/baselayer, must dry quickly and not retain that bad sweat odour which I find is a serious problem with cheaper brands.

Not the best subject, so appologies for that.

Basically I run, cycle and climb, I've had a bit of a lay off for a few years, so I guess I'm a little out of shape and a little older and I've found this has become a serious problem in terms of damp patches and being smelly (Sorry, I tried to sugar coat it as best I could)

Any suggestion would be greatfully recieved
Thanks
Mr-Cowdrey on 18 May 2013
In reply to Bert: Ice Breaker stuff is the dogs in my opinion. Its made from merino wool so doesn't smell and wicks pretty well. Although it is expensive! Failing that, then RAB MeCo. its a combination of merino wool and coconut fibres. Works just as well.
GridNorth - on 18 May 2013
In reply to Mr-Cowdrey: I prefer polyester type garments particularly "capilene". The merino seems to take ages to dry when you wash it.
Glyno - on 18 May 2013
In reply to Bert:

Polyester or Polypropylene is better at wicking and dries very quickly but can get a bit wiffy.
Merino is less efficient at wicking but doesn't smell as quickly.

swings and roundabouts.
GridNorth - on 18 May 2013
In reply to Glyno: I must be lucky then because I have never had any problems with smelly polyester. Having said that I wouldn't wear a T-shirt for more than 3 days. Not sure what's considered the norm in this regard.
Mr-Cowdrey on 18 May 2013
In reply to GridNorth: I agree it does take a while to dry. I mostly use merino in the winter or in the Alps where I'll be wearing it for a couple of days. In summer though I stick to man made fibres for single day stuff.
davegs - on 18 May 2013
In reply to Bert:

Andy Kirkpatrick raves about this stuff

http://www.brynje-shop.com/classic-c15
Solaris - on 18 May 2013
In reply to Bert:

Merino is warmer when wet than polyester but given its slower wicking rate, that's swings and roundabouts, too. And I find that if I wear merino under a man-made mid-layer, it starts to smell more quickly than otherwise.

I'm off on a backpacking trip soon and have invested in Berghaus Argentium on the strength of a shirt I bought in Australia based on the same technology: I've worn that for 2 weeks at a stretch in Wadi Rum spring heat and it's stayed amazingly odour free, relatively speaking.
phicklephancyphree on 18 May 2013
In reply to Bert:

Hands down Arcteryx Phase SL
ciaran1999 - on 19 May 2013
In reply to Bert:

There are essentially two ways to approach base-layers; those that wick well, dry fast and are light weight (synthetic) and those that are more comfortable, warmer and do not retain odours (merino).

Given that you are engaging in higher intensity activities you will need a base-layer which will wick better than merino and dry faster. The best base-layers for your intended activities are the Rab MeCo base-layers which use a third coco fibres and two thirds merino fibres. The coco allows it to dry significantly faster while the merino prevents the build up of odours and maintains comfort.

If i were you I would avoid pure merino if you find you're sweating alot as it is unlikely to be able to cope with the amount of moisture being created and will eventually become clammy and cold especially when moving from high to low intensity activities, for example going downhill on the bike after a long climb.

I generally use merino for climbing, walking and mountaineering, and MeCo for cycling. Hope this helps!
GridNorth - on 19 May 2013
In reply to Bert: I don't look to the base layer to provide any meaningful insulation so I prefer something that wicks well and dries quickly so I can wear it for 2 or 3 days and then wash it. That way I know when I go away for whatever length of time all I need is 3 garments which I can rotate. If it's exceptionally cold I may wear a powerstretch top but even then I wear that more often as an insulation layer not a base layer. This only applies to climbing activities for me.
Antigua - on 19 May 2013
In reply to GridNorth:
> (In reply to Glyno) I must be lucky then because I have never had any problems with smelly polyester.

Your not the problem its what those around you think ;)
Bert - on 19 May 2013
In reply to Bert: Thanks for all the advice so far, will be looking into those suggestions.

Has anyone tried the Paramo Cambia t-shirts, are they any good by comparison?

At the minute I'm looking more for the summer activity stuff, I'm heading camping and back packing for a month where I am planning on being pretty active so am trying to narrow down a few good garments that will keep me fresh for a few days at a time (tall order I know lol)

Thanks again
Ted78 on 21 May 2013
In reply to Bert:
I have a cambia T shirt and it does wick but is too hot.
I thinks the best for wicking and drying off quickly are Helly Hansen
thin bob on 21 May 2013
In reply to Bert:
most comfortable for me is an old snot-green coolmax t-shirt, feels like a cotton shirt.

Nike sphere or dryfit works well for me & is often cheap in tk max. only problem is getting the logos off it. tolerable for a couple of days.

Merino lasted a winter weeks run, walk, cycle & sleep. not the most absorbant or quick drying, though comfy. the summerweight stuff is good, but expensive.
Gene00 - on 23 May 2013
In reply to Bert: RAB Meco for me. Available in long and short sleeve and different weights. It wicks very well, dries quickly and doesn't smell (even after several days without washing).
The boxers are excellent too. Highly recommend both products
Morgan Woods - on 23 May 2013
In reply to GridNorth:
> (In reply to Mr-Cowdrey) I prefer polyester type garments particularly "capilene". The merino seems to take ages to dry when you wash it.

Yeah i rate the Patagonia stuff too. I have 4 Capilene 3 & 4 base layers which are all about 5 years old and still going strong despite near daily use.
markus691 on 23 May 2013
In reply to Gene00:
Boxers? Is their any point to getting those in merino/meco? At what temperatures can you wash the stuff?
GrendeI on 23 May 2013
In reply to phicklephancyphree:
> (In reply to Bert)
>
> Hands down Arcteryx Phase SL

Or EON SLW if you go for wool, both are some of the best fitting and comfortable base layers in existence. Far, far better design and fit than any ice-breaker item. Plus they're cut loooong so you can tuck them in and they never come out of your pants...

Although they are actually surprisingly close in terms of fit and shape to the RedRam (Owned by Icebreaker) merino T-shirts (about half the price) but much better quality wool and construction.


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