/ Cadence

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Pids - on 06 Oct 2013
Went out road biking today in a group as opposed to solo, noticed that whilst we rode as a bunch most(ok, all others) seemed to be in easier gear and peddling fast whilst I was in harder gear peddling slower - I'm a beginner to all of this so why peddle in higher cadence, what are the benefits?
remus - on 06 Oct 2013
In reply to Pids: My (very limited) understanding is that a high cadence keeps your body working aerobically whereas it is easy to do anaerobic work when pedalling at a low cadence. Anaerobic work is bad for distance sports as your body isn't designed to handle large volumes of anaerobic exercise.
lost1977 - on 06 Oct 2013
In reply to Pids:

often kinder on knees, better response when you do change gears
JLS on 06 Oct 2013
In reply to Pids:

>"so why peddle in higher cadence, what are the benefits?"

Basically it's thought to be more efficient. Typically 90rpm is the number to be above.

It takes a bit of getting use to but you get there.

Aren't you riding a fixie to work? A low geared fixie is the ideal way of training leg speed.
Wee Davie - on 06 Oct 2013
In reply to Pids:

Straining at each pedal stroke is supposed to be bad news for your knees. I once met a guy at the Lonach Gathering who had kneecles (like cankles but higher up) caused by excessive hard training on a fixie. He'd had to bin cycling years previously but his knees were still as thick as his thighs- scar tissue? Chronic inflammation?
Lord of Starkness - on 07 Oct 2013
In reply to Pids: With lighter gearing and a higher cadence you can basically keep going for much longer. I'm comfortable pedalling in the range of 80 - 110 RPM.
woolsack - on 07 Oct 2013
In reply to Pids: Our club does a 66" gearing TT as a one off for some curious club trophy dating back to the 30's and some of the riders in that were having to pedal at around 130rpm
EddInaBox on 07 Oct 2013
In reply to Pids:

Learn from Louise Watmough's mistake, you should definitely try to spin faster in a low gear than push a high one.
TomBaker - on 07 Oct 2013
In reply to EddInaBox:
> (In reply to Pids)
>
> Learn from Louise Watmough's mistake, you should definitely try to spin faster in a low gear than push a high one.

Quick google search doesn't reveal much care to enlighten me?
streapadair - on 07 Oct 2013
In reply to TomBaker:

A legend. Google 'Louise Watmough brittle knees'.
Mike Highbury - on 07 Oct 2013
In reply to streapadair:
> (In reply to TomBaker)
>
> A legend. Google 'Louise Watmough brittle knees'.

FFS, I could have been a professional climber if it wasn't for those pesky kids!

SecretSquirrel - on 10 Oct 2013
In reply to JLS:
> Basically it's thought to be more efficient. Typically 90rpm is the number to be above.

So how do you know what your rpm is or how far you are off the magic 90?
tim000 - on 10 Oct 2013
In reply to SecretSquirrel: cycle computer with a cadance sensor.
m dunn - on 12 Oct 2013
In reply to Pids: Mate; even on a mountainbike, you birl once for every two of mine!! Builds up the calves though ;)
aligibb - on 12 Oct 2013
In reply to Pids:
The best way someone explained it to me when I started was this.

Imagine you have 500kg of weights to lift. You can either do the 500kg once, 100kg 5 times, 10kg 50 times or 5 kg 100times etc etc. Obviously the 500kg one won't happen. Some people may be able to do the 50kg a few times, but I for one def can't. So it partly depends on your strength and physiology but the easiest option will be the lighter weight more times as you will be able to keep doing that for longer.
So if you want to cycle for longer then easier pedalling at a higher cadence.

I don't think I explained that as well as I could have done!!!
JLS on 12 Oct 2013
In reply to SecretSquirrel:

Watch on handle bars count 15sec worth of pedal strokes (one leg) >23 good!
altirando - on 13 Oct 2013
In reply to Pids: Watch the TDF next year and compare the different hill climbing styles. There definitely seems to be more guys riding uphill at a high cadence on a low gear than the big gear out of the saddle honkers now.
Minneconjou Sioux - on 13 Oct 2013
In reply to aligibb:
> (In reply to Pids)
> The best way someone explained it to me when I started was this.
>
> Imagine you have 500kg of weights to lift. You can either do the 500kg once, 100kg 5 times, 10kg 50 times or 5 kg 100times etc etc. Obviously the 500kg one won't happen. Some people may be able to do the 50kg a few times, but I for one def can't. So it partly depends on your strength and physiology but the easiest option will be the lighter weight more times as you will be able to keep doing that for longer.
> So if you want to cycle for longer then easier pedalling at a higher cadence.
>
> I don't think I explained that as well as I could have done!!!

I think that about sums it up.

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