/ how to get into skiing?

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Oliiver - on 09 Nov 2013
Hi,

I've skiied twice before in Switzerland at the age of 10 and Scotland at the age of 12 - i'm now 16. I want to get into skiing and i thought about going to ski in scotland this winter -(can you recommend any?). Is it worth going to a Ski school for a week vs paying for a Ski instructor for a few days and going on my own on the slope? I was thinking about the Cairngorm area. I've got all the kit bar skis and boots - (but might buy considering i've stopped growing).

Cheers
Doug on 09 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver: where do you live ? Scotland is great for skiing if you live there & can pick the good days, unfortunately they're relatively rare & tend to be midweek. If you live in England, especially the south, go to the Alps.
Oliiver - on 09 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver: i live in Cheshire. I'd go to the Alps but i don't think my parents would be that happy with it lol. Cost wise, how much does it work out to be for 2 weeks? flights + accommodation + schools?
pec on 09 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver: I wouldn't waste my money on ski schools, its just time on skis for kids while their parents get on with skiing without their kids in the way. The amount of useful learning that goes on is minimal.
Anyone reasonably fit and coordinated will improve a lot just trying on their own.
If you feel you're not improving then have a private lesson, 1 or 2 of you with your own instructor. That can be very worthwhile. 1 hour of private tuition is worth more than a day in a group lesson.
tim000 - on 10 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver: take a look at the snowheads forum http://snowheads.com/ski-forum/viewforum.php?f=19&sid=38e5a4cdd54012ad17fcd807865897d0 . there are some group places there . i`d go for the alps though as said above . if your in cheshire try the chill factor at the trafford centre before you go to get back in to it .
alasdair19 on 11 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver: check out

www.skitourscotland.co.uk should give you some ideas.

Join a club cause that will get you access to cars going North probably the most important piece of kit!
Jamie Everitt - on 18 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver: Soon as you hit 18 check out UCPA in France, they're cheap and everything is included. Lessons have their advantages but once you reach a certain level an instructor becomes a guide.
yorkshireman - on 19 Nov 2013
In reply to pec:
> (In reply to Oliiver) I wouldn't waste my money on ski schools, its just time on skis for kids while their parents get on with skiing without their kids in the way. The amount of useful learning that goes on is minimal.
> Anyone reasonably fit and coordinated will improve a lot just trying on their own.

I think that's questionable advice at best, especially for a beginner who hasn't got their technique down yet.

It also depends on the quality of the instructor/ski school, with some being glorified baby sitters.

The problem with skiing is that it can feel like you're doing everything right but unless you see yourself on film, or somebody tells you, its difficult to fix the little mistakes which overtime become ingrained.

I agree there comes a point when marginal gains become neglible but I don't think the OP is there yet.
outtathaway - on 19 Nov 2013
In reply to yorkshireman:

I agree, if you go on the slopes without hsving had any lessons, in my opinion that's pretty wreckless. It won't be much fun for you because you won't have control, and you'll also be a liability to others. Also you'll pick up bad habits. Just book yourself in at ski school, not all groups are huge, and if you'd prefer one to one tuition then of course you can book that for an extra cost. If you're going with the école de ski francais then make sure that the instructor speaks good English, otherwise there's the option of ski schools with BASI (British association of ski instructors) instructors. I'm biased but I think BASI instructors are well trained and of course there's no language barrier.
outtathaway - on 19 Nov 2013
In reply to jamesgreenfield: Woops, just noticed you were saying about the cairngorm area, still my advice about lessons being useful and BASI instructors being good still applies. Also you're not a complete beginner actually, but still lessons will be useful, especially if you want to improve. Also maybe you could try your local dry ski slope or even indoor snow dome (if there's one near)?
pdone on 19 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver:
Have you looked into joining a ski-club that uses one of the artificial slopes near you? It is a way to get regular practice. There are usually club instructors who are only too willing to teach and encourage keen club members. It is probably the cheapest way to learn for someone who cannot ski regularly on snow.
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mit - on 20 Nov 2013
In reply to JimJam87:

This might help, http://www.action-outdoors.co.uk/students/ucpa-youth-program-(under-18's) if you can find some older friends?


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