/ Innominata Ridge one axe or two

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gscw - on 09 Jun 2014
I'm hoping to do the Innominata Ridge with a novice next month. Should I take 2 tools on the route.

Thanks.
jon on 09 Jun 2014
In reply to gscw:

I took two tools. But I wouldn't take a novice.
jayjackson - on 10 Jun 2014
In reply to gscw:

In reply to jon:

I only used one, but both of us were carrying two. The main couloir and the exit from that to the ridge could be time consuming if it were in thin conditions with one axe - not unclimbable by any means though.

Long, serious and very committing route; agree with Jon here and also wouldn't take a novice...
Robert Durran - on 10 Jun 2014
In reply to jon:

> I took two tools. But I wouldn't take a novice.

I took one (an axe that is, not a novice).
walts4 - on 10 Jun 2014
In reply to gscw:

Take two.. Better to be looking at the second axe than searching for it whilst realy wanting it!
rif on 10 Jun 2014
In reply to gscw:

Agree with what others have said. I would have been very glad to have had two modern tools when I did it
http://www.ukclimbing.com/images/dbpage.html?id=162175

Chesher cat on 10 Jun 2014
In reply to gscw:

Brave soul for taking a novice up but have a look at link.

http://www.summitpost.org/the-innominata-ridge/546034

Simon4 - on 10 Jun 2014
In reply to Chesher cat:
That line of the route in red is awe-inspiring, as is the overall view of the South (Italian), side of Mont Blanc. This is big, remote terrain, astonishingly fierce. Just to get to the Eccles bivi huts to launch is a route in itself, while they are in a very serious position - and pretty hard to find in poor visibility.

Regarding the novice .... as others have said.

FAO Martin - it still doesn't inspire me to try Mont Brouillard! Or the Pic Luigi Amedo.
Post edited at 10:03
MG - on 10 Jun 2014
In reply to Simon4:


> FAO Martin - it still doesn't inspire me to try Mont Brouillard! Or the Pic Luigi Amedo.

Pfft!
jon on 10 Jun 2014
In reply to MG:

> Pfft!

Lightweight, eh?
Solaris - on 10 Jun 2014
In reply to MG:

Inspiration? More like perspiration! I've got clammy hands just looking at that picture. I'm (almost!) glad I can't join you!

Anyway, back on topic...
Simon4 - on 10 Jun 2014
In reply to Solaris:

This picture is even more awesome, especially when blown up :

http://images.summitpost.org/original/70346.jpg

What I remember about the area is just how huge the scale of everything is, from the Freney and Brouillard glaciers, although you are pretty high up, everything just seems to tower far above you.
Solaris - on 11 Jun 2014
In reply to Simon4:

Yeah, sorry, that's the one I was meaning. I've been on that side of MB but that picture (of only 1/2 of it!) really brings home the reason why people use "Himalayan" to describe the S side.

I wonder whether the OP's proposed partner has been shown that image?
Simon4 - on 11 Jun 2014
In reply to Solaris:

Another face of Himalayan proportions and aura is the East face of Monte Rosa, from (I think), the Italian Macugnaga valley.

I remember walking into the cirque beneath it on a cloudy day, hard going on a not particularly well made Italian path (for the previous few days, I had been in trainers on manicured tracks in the Swiss Engandine). Beneath the face, the cloud gradually rose, revealing precipice towering over ice-cliff over buttress, higher and higher into the sky till the belayer's neck became unbearable, as the vast face reared ever higher and ever more awe-inspiringly into the sky, cloud remnants still swirling threateningly around it.

It was an extraordinary sight, especially as it is easily accessible from gentle domesticated valleys.
ads.ukclimbing.com
Solaris - on 11 Jun 2014
In reply to Simon4:

Agreed!

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