/ Anybody managed this party trick?

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Big Lee - on 01 Sep 2014
I was pulling my ab rope down the other day and gave it a good tug just before the end was about to fall so as to make sure it didn't catch on any rocks below. Somehow I managed to tie the end of the rope to the krab that I was abseiling from in the process:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/leeharrison/14923271610/

1 in a million?
Andrew Wilson - on 01 Sep 2014
In reply to Big Lee:

Cool, did this mean you could abseil the 2nd pitch in a one-r?

I once bailed off a winter route in a blizzard, in the dark, and when trying to pull the ropes found that they would only move a meter whichever way I pulled. We had abbed from the 2nd belay where I left a bomber wire. At some point during the abseil the rope had clipped itself into an in-situ peg with a krab, thus trapping the knot between 2 krabs.
I only know this because some kind soul returned the ropes to us and explained how they were found!

Andy
stewieatb on 01 Sep 2014
In reply to Big Lee:

I've seen one other person post on here in ~5 years with exactly the same problem. The end whips up through its own loop when you give it the final tug.
3 Names - on 01 Sep 2014
In reply to Big Lee:

I've had this happen twice in twenty five years of climbing
keith-ratcliffe on 01 Sep 2014
In reply to Big Lee:
Mmmm the self manufacturing half hitch - a rare example!
This reminds me of a hypothetical problem that was set whilst on an MIC training course. It involved the retreat of a big wall with a wildly overhanging pitch of 40 m to a good ledge with a 50m rope with more easy short abseils to follow below. This required the rope to be retrieved. One solution (Not tried or recommended) involved a sheepshank in the rope in which the dead part was then cut. While in tension the knot held but when shaken out it released allowing the continuation of the retreat process.
Post edited at 22:23
Steve Perry - on 01 Sep 2014
In reply to Big Lee:

It happened to me and the Mrs sport climbing a few months ago, same knot.
jwa - on 01 Sep 2014
This happened to me the first day I was climbing in Tonsai, Thailand. I'd led a short multi pitch route in one, my friend had top roped it, then we tried to pull the rope down but it wouldn't budge. I ended up climbing up someone else's top rope then doing a combination of aiding and leading up and across to my line. In the dark. Possibly the most exhausting climbing related thing I've ever done. There was no more than a centimetre holding the rope in place. I think the way I'd threaded the lower off might have twisted the rope more than usual. In hindsight it would have been easier to pull the other party's rope down and just lead my route again.

Jonny2vests - on 01 Sep 2014
In reply to Big Lee:
Top tip, don't suddenly give it 'a good tug'. Smoothly pulling removes a lot of weird edge cases like this.
Post edited at 23:37
Flashy - on 02 Sep 2014
In reply to Big Lee:

Did this abbing off bolts on an ice route. Looked exactly the same as your problem when I climbed back up to sort it out.
Martyn Maltby on 02 Sep 2014
In reply to Big Lee:

In a blizzard descending Mount Kenya:

http://www.ukclimbing.com/images/dbpage.html?id=205233
Big Lee - on 02 Sep 2014
In reply to Jonny2vests:

> Top tip, don't suddenly give it 'a good tug'. Smoothly pulling removes a lot of weird edge cases like this.

Yeah, I'm sure it does. Problem I find with just letting the rope fall is that it's more likely to catch on spikes, etc and get jammed that way. Maybe it's a skinny half rope problem.

Big Lee - on 02 Sep 2014
In reply to Martyn Maltby:

Must have been grim. I was lucky in that I only had 20m climbing back up to to ab point.
Big Lee - on 02 Sep 2014
In reply to Andrew Wilson:

Awesome. That is really bad luck!
Merlin - on 02 Sep 2014
In reply to Big Lee:

Amazing! I'd never seen or heard of this before!
John Stainforth - on 02 Sep 2014
In reply to Big Lee:

It is amazing what the end of a rope will do. Much more common than this, the end of the rope can form a small loop that is not threaded through itself, but which nevertheless can fly into a crack and get caught. When one tries to pull the rope down, the downward rope jams sideways against the upward going rope. The more one pulls, the worse the jam becomes. As others have said, I think it is best to be gentle or even very gentle with that final tug.
ads.ukclimbing.com
JimR - on 02 Sep 2014
In reply to Big Lee:

This happened to a mate of mine when he was descending in the Dolomites. He had an exciting time jumaring back up it to retrieve .. apparently no other option.

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