/ NEWS: MacLeod completes Scotland's Hardest Sport Climb

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Michael Ryan - on 12 Oct 2006
What a year so far for Dave MacLeod; hard mixed Scottish, cutting edge bouldering, Rhapsody and now the hardest sport route in Scotland.

See a full report (with photos) in the News at UKClimbing.com

http://www.ukclimbing.com/news/
lostintranslation85 on 12 Oct 2006 - imap.bieberstein.de
In reply to Mick Ryan - UKClimbing.com:


bloody hell,

well done Dave... again!


Oli
tony on 12 Oct 2006
In reply to Mick Ryan - UKClimbing.com:

He's a bit unstoppable at the moment!
Chris Fryer - on 12 Oct 2006
In reply to tony: On fire alright. Wonder what he will produce this winter?
JLS on 12 Oct 2006
In reply to Chris Fryer:

>"Wonder what he will produce this winter?"

Give that outfit he's wearing on Bodyswerve I think he'll be too busy helping Santa this winter to get much done.
Bill Davidson - on 12 Oct 2006
In reply to Mick Ryan - UKClimbing.com:

I liked one of Dave's quotes from last week

"I miss feeling fit" FFS

Bill
Stuart S - on 12 Oct 2006
In reply to JLS:

> Give that outfit he's wearing on Bodyswerve I think he'll be too busy helping Santa this winter to get much done.

What outfit? You mean the Mountain Equipment t-shirt?
mik on 12 Oct 2006 - blueice2n1.uk.ibm.com
In reply to Chris Fryer:
> (In reply to tony) On fire alright. Wonder what he will produce this winter?

lots of snow i hope.
JLS on 12 Oct 2006
In reply to Stuart S:

>"You mean the Mountain Equipment t-shirt?"

And matching pointy hat with colour co-ordinated harness and trousers!
Graham T - on 12 Oct 2006
In reply to JLS:
He does look a bit like a pixie.
But good on him.
He must be one if not the best all round climber in the world now.
GrahamD - on 12 Oct 2006
In reply to Mick Ryan - UKClimbing.com:

After an 8C after 45 minute walk in and in the pishing rain as well !
Chris Fryer - on 12 Oct 2006
In reply to JLS:
>
> Give that outfit he's wearing on Bodyswerve I think he'll be too busy helping Santa this winter to get much done.

Are you criticizing his fashion sense? http://www.ukclimbing.com/images/dbpage.html?id=49740
you?

TonyM - on 12 Oct 2006
In reply to Mick Ryan - UKClimbing.com:

I'm not being funny - rather I'm genuienely interested - but were it not for the fact that Scotland hasn't got a plethora of hard sports routes, would this be news? I mean there's been recent discussion about whether ascent of Action Directe (9a) is newsworthy any more. And in the UKC News section this appears alongside the list of the dozen women who have now climbed F8c.

There's no doubt about what a fine climber dumbie Dave truly is, and this underlines his all round talent. But for me the news is less about the climb's difficulty, than highlighting the sparsity of high standard bolt clipping in Scotland. Or, is it just that the grades are well tough north of the border - given the low success rate on the Anvil's F8a? ...browing 8a.nu you'd get the impression lots of folk are on-sighting 8a for breakfast!
Norrie Muir - on 12 Oct 2006
In reply to TonyM:
> (In reply to Mick Ryan - UKClimbing.com)
>
>But for me the news is less about the climb's difficulty, than highlighting the sparsity of high standard bolt clipping in Scotland.

Scotland is way behind in Sports climbing. So reporting the route as Scotlands hardest is reasonable, it is not misleading anyone.

Yes, some reporting is not newsworthy, if it is World hardness you want, nothing should be reported about winter climbing in Wales or England, nevermind Sports climbing in the UK at all.
Chris Fryer - on 12 Oct 2006
In reply to TonyM: As there aren't that many routes in the UK graded 8c or above, the FA of a new one is of national importance, if not international. As UKC is read on a (predominantly) national basis, I think it's worthy of news.
Michael Ryan - on 12 Oct 2006
In reply to TonyM:

Hi Tony....an ascent of Action Direct is news, this latest ascent by Dave is news, all those women climbing 8c is news...it really is very simple. They were all news to me when I heard of these events. But really the question you ask is should they be included in the news section of a website or magazine, are the important enough? I think they are....and also today's small piece on Mallorca bouldering as well.

It isn't a comparative thing, like, well the cut off point for news is such and such a grade. There's more things factor in to it than that, the primary one is do people want to hear about it? Will it be interesting to a certain sector of the climbing community?

And as you say...whilst 8c isn't cutting edge (it is very hard of course) there are more reasons for including this ascent as a news item.....several reasons as you yourself describe.

You browse 8a.nu? Not before breakfast I hope.

Mick
Beaver - on 12 Oct 2006
In reply to Norrie Muir: I agree with Norrie!

I also think that the clue is in the webpage you are on. You are on www.UKclimbing.com, emphasis on "UK". If you were on www.FRclimbing.com then no, I can't see the Frenchies reporting it as news.

It's still a tremendous effort by one of the worlds leading allround climbers, even though it's "only an 8c, not a 9a"


(I use the "only" with a huge piece of tongue lodged firmly in my cheek)
TonyM - on 12 Oct 2006
In reply to Mick Ryan - UKClimbing.com:
Hi Mick - personally, I have a very low threshold for what is news, and love to hear climbing-orientated 'celeb goss'. So please keep it up. I guess rather that saying 'is it news', I should have said 'is it of noteworthy difficulty in the UK'. To which the answer is probably not, but I'm fascinated as to why there aren't more very hard sports routes in Scotland. Venues? Weather? Grading? Climbers? Maybe all four?

Tony

PS 8a.nu - couldn't get past the homepage. Too headspinning.
Michael Ryan - on 12 Oct 2006
In reply to TonyM:
> (In reply to Mick Ryan - UKClimbing.com)
> Hi Mick - personally, I have a very low threshold for what is news, and love to hear climbing-orientated 'celeb goss'.

Hold on 10 mins.....I'll get some.


> but I'm fascinated as to why there aren't more very hard sports routes in Scotland. Venues? Weather? Grading? Climbers? Maybe all four?

I think weather and venues/geology. Could be wrong.
Erik B - on 12 Oct 2006
In reply to TonyM: not many people new route in scotland let alone put in the effort of bolting and working small low level crags which are the only crags which are acceptable to bolt.

as for the goelogy thing, thst is utter nonsense, there is rock everywhere in scotland and many different types. down south there are too many people and not enough rock hence why so many choss heaps are developed
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Michael Ryan - on 12 Oct 2006
In reply to Erik B:

> (In reply to TonyM) there is rock everywhere in scotland and many different types

But is it suitable for high end sport climbing?

Norrie Muir - on 12 Oct 2006
In reply to Mick Ryan - UKClimbing.com:
> (In reply to TonyM)
>
> I think weather and venues/geology. Could be wrong.

Dear Mick

You are right, in the we winter climb. The venues are so varied that we go to the mountains as well as low down crags. It maybe also we are not all hung up on one type of mountaineering. Dave's Trad climbing and winter climbing is OK, so what that his Sports climbing is not that great compared to Tony. We can't all be tigers.

Norrie
GrahamD - on 12 Oct 2006
In reply to TonyM:

I'm fascinated as to why there aren't more very hard sports routes in Scotland. Venues? Weather? Grading? Climbers? Maybe all four?

Relatively small population of Scotland would be a significant factor, I'd imagine.
Norrie Muir - on 12 Oct 2006
In reply to Mick Ryan - UKClimbing.com:
> (In reply to Erik B)
>
> But is it suitable for high end sport climbing?

Dear Mick

There is a thing called progression, give it time. We lag behind, just like in Trad climbing.

Norrie
Erik B - on 12 Oct 2006
In reply to Mick Ryan - UKClimbing.com: yes, the supply is infinite, biggest prob is location
Andy S - on 12 Oct 2006
In reply to Norrie Muir: I'm not sure Norrie. I'm not familiar with all areas of Scotland (basically anything north of Fort William and Aviemore), but I'm familiar with many areas south of that and I haven't yet seen much steep stuff for high-grade sport climbing.
Andy S - on 12 Oct 2006
In reply to Mick Ryan - UKClimbing.com: I'm dying to know EXACTLY where this crag is - it's not on the substation crag as is indicated on the photo is it? The article says the east shore of Loch Goil. I really want to know - a grid reference would be nice(!), as I used to live in Lochgoilhead and am very familiar with the shoreline because I used to sea-kayak up and down there quite alot. However, I've not seen that crag, it's must be hidden by the trees somewhere. It can't be that big slab down the end (very visible from the water because, well, it's a slab! However, I have a faint memory of some steep-looking stuff just near the slab. Anyone know?
Norrie Muir - on 12 Oct 2006
In reply to Andy S:
> (In reply to Norrie Muir) I'm not sure Norrie. I'm not familiar with all areas of Scotland (basically anything north of Fort William and Aviemore), but I'm familiar with many areas south of that and I haven't yet seen much steep stuff for high-grade sport climbing.

That is OK, I do know about your limited knowledge of both climbing and the geography of Scotland. We will never get Sports route like those in Spain etc, but they won't get winter climbing like we get in Scotland. We can't have everything It just shows what a good effort Dave put in for this route.
BelleVedere on 12 Oct 2006
Andy S - on 12 Oct 2006
In reply to Norrie Muir: Yeah whatever Norrie, didn't see that pathetic dig coming, honest.
Mick Ward - on 12 Oct 2006
In reply to Mick Ryan - UKClimbing.com:

A great effort.

Mick
Andy S - on 12 Oct 2006
In reply to es: Cheers for that! I wonder when those 6b's were put up?
Norrie Muir - on 12 Oct 2006
In reply to Andy S:
> (In reply to Norrie Muir) Yeah whatever Norrie, didn't see that pathetic dig coming, honest.

I like this bit of your post " The article says the east shore of Loch Goil. I really want to know - a grid reference would be nice(!), as I used to live in Lochgoilhead and am very familiar with the shoreline because I used to sea-kayak up and down there quite alot. However, I've not seen that crag, it's must be hidden by the trees somewhere".

My younger friends have climbed there and recommend it, so just in case you can't find the grid ref from es's link, here it is NS 206 949.

Norrie
Norrie Muir - on 12 Oct 2006
In reply to Andy S:
> (In reply to es) Cheers for that! I wonder when those 6b's were put up?

Try this http://www.scottishclimbs.com/viewcrag.php?area=0&crag=130&aid=3&page=1&cid=&rti...
NDD - on 12 Oct 2006
In reply to Mick Ryan - UKClimbing.com: Well done Dave.
Andy S - on 12 Oct 2006
In reply to Norrie Muir: Yeah I've looked it up on the OS site. I've not been there; I've walked around just north of it and just south of it but not just there! When my shoulder gets better and I'm up there visiting friends I'll be sure to pay the crag a visit and have a crack at those 6b's - look really good! I'll tick-off the 8c if I've got a few days to spare.
mark1984 on 12 Oct 2006
In reply to Norrie Muir:

I feel Dave is coming into the realm of best climbing all rounder!!!

however maybe some expeditions should be on his agenda next!!

he has achieved a great deal and shines in all disciplines!!!

credit to him. a great inspiration!
Michael Ryan - on 12 Oct 2006
In reply to mark1984:
> (In reply to Norrie Muir)

> however maybe some expeditions should be on his agenda next!!

Maybe Yosemite?
In reply to Mick Ryan - UKClimbing.com:

Aye if some climbing firm decide to pay him enough to live on and travel.
Davie
GrahamD - on 13 Oct 2006
In reply to mark1984:
> (In reply to Norrie Muir)
>
> I feel Dave is coming into the realm of best climbing all rounder!!!
>

The uber Huber will be a tough act to follow ...
ads.ukclimbing.com
IceBun - on 13 Oct 2006
In reply to I am the God of Strathyre: Yeh or we could all chip in 20 each so he can go climbing.
slacky on 14 Oct 2006
In reply to Mick Ryan - UKClimbing.com:
> (In reply to TonyM)
>
> an ascent of Action Direct is news, this latest ascent by Dave is news, all those women climbing 8c is news...it really is very simple. They were all news to me when I heard of these events.

One mans news is anothers chip wrapping :D

slacky on 14 Oct 2006
In reply to slacky:

Note that I am in no way attempting to belittle anyone's achievements, they are outsanding and deserve acknowledmgent , I'm simply (attempting) to point out the subjectivity of news.
Michael Ryan - on 14 Oct 2006
In reply to slacky:
> (In reply to slacky)
>
> I'm simply (attempting) to point out the subjectivity of news.

Exactly and that is the whole point.

slacky on 14 Oct 2006
In reply to slacky: Note that I am in no way attempting to belittle anyone's achievements, they are outstanding and deserve acknowledgement , I'm simply (attempting) to point out the subjectivity of news.

(Corrected for typos)
kajsurfer on 14 Oct 2006
In reply to Norrie Muir:

I did a new route in Tonga a few years back. Taki Mali, HVS5a trad. 15m. Limestone on the Island of Eua. Is it newsworthy being possibly the first ever recorded, named route in the country.

1988 Wall street, 1989 Maginot Line and Agincourt. I think it probably is newsworthy, what Mr MacLeod has been doing. Mr Ryan is probably the best judge of that. Mainly because some people with tabloid sensibilities want to know. He (MacLeod) has minor celebrity status in the limited world of climbing. But whether the news is interesting or or exciting, well that's an entirely different matter.

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