/ NEWS: The world's lightest carabiner

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.
Michael Ryan - on 28 Mar 2007
DMM have started producing the Phantom carabiner. This carabiner, they claim, is the lightest functioning carabiner in the world at 25.5 grams with a gate-closed strength of 23kn and a gate-open strength of 9kn.

More at the news page of UKClimbing.com http://www.ukclimbing.com/news/
Timmd on 28 Mar 2007
In reply to Mick Ryan - UKClimbing.com:Cor.
Paz - on 28 Mar 2007
In reply to Mick Ryan - UKClimbing.com:

A full 7.5 grams lighter than the Helium. Let's hope there's no mass recall this time.
stp - on 30 Mar 2007
In reply to Mick Ryan - UKClimbing.com:

> Why should climbers buy this rather than some cheaper carabiner manufactured in China ....after all price is everything

Well price is everything to some, weight is everything to others. Personally I like DMM's roller 'biners ( http://www.dmmclimbing.com/productsDetails.asp?id=&id2=76 ). There is no doubt that these extend the life of your rope so will save you money in the long term. However what DMM's blurb doesn't mention is how nice it is to fall off onto these 'biners. Falling off onto one feels much smoother and softer than with ordinary krabs. Perhaps this is because, as DMM says, "the forces ... are more evenly distributed throughout the system" with these krabs.

Whatever the reason for anyone into redpointing more than onsighting a few of these in the rack are well worth having.

I don't know how well these krabs are selling. My guess is that the marketing of these appeals mostly to more nerdy climbers who never fall anyway. Maybe DMM should distribute some to climbing walls so more climbers get to feel the benefits for themselves rather relying on technoblurb.

I'll certainly be buying a few more before my next trip away anyway.
In reply to stp: I've got a couple of the DMM Revolvers on extendable quickdraws, and I tend to use them on long trad routes to reduce the rope drag. I think they help, but of course unless you climb the same route again with normal quickdraws, it is hard to know for sure!
featuresforfeet - on 30 Mar 2007
In reply to Mick Ryan - UKClimbing.com:

Where can I buy one these fine products?

CarolineMc - on 30 Mar 2007
In reply to featuresforfeet: In your reputable independent climbing emporium of course! C-:
catt on 30 Mar 2007
In reply to Paz:

i have a few heliums, any more info about this recall?
featuresforfeet - on 30 Mar 2007
In reply to CarolineMc:

Not yet it would appear - anyone know of a shop with them in stock? Have time contraints on purchase you see...
DMM Wales - on 30 Mar 2007 - dmmwales.com
In reply to featuresforfeet:
Where are you based and I'll let you know your nearest dealer.
Chris Rowlands
Brand Manager DMM
stp - on 30 Mar 2007
In reply to Nick Smith - UKC:
> I think they help, but of course unless you climb the same route again with normal quickdraws, it is hard to know for sure!

Yeah so maybe not worth shelling out the extra cash then. As a sport climber though I can say that falling off with one of these as the top piece of gear the difference is quite apparent. And as someone usually terrified of falling off anything that makes the experience more pleasant is well worth the investing in.

In reply to stp:
> As a sport climber though I can say that falling off with one of these as the top piece of gear the difference is quite apparent. And as someone usually terrified of falling off anything that makes the experience more pleasant is well worth the investing in.

So you'd place these on every bolt you are likely to fall on, while red pointing? Do you replace them with normal quickdraws once you've got a section of the route sorted? How low down do you use them - I guess that you don't want a more dynamic fall on the first 3 bolts in case you deck?
In reply to stp:
> As a sport climber though I can say that falling off with one of these as the top piece of gear the difference is quite apparent.

Does your belayer mind though? I've heard stories of people flying up into the air due to the reduced friction. I have one but I don't think I've ever fallen on to it. I will put it on a sport climbing QD today and try it out with my biggest mate as the belayers.
catt on 30 Mar 2007
In reply to stp:
> (In reply to Mick Ryan - UKClimbing.com)
> .Personally I like DMM's roller 'biners.... However what DMM's blurb doesn't mention is how nice it is to fall off onto these 'biners.

what it doesn't tell you is how horrible it is to belay when they are the first bit of gear/clip in and few other runners above it. you lose a lot/all friction in the system and i got pulled off my feet and across the floor of the grande grotte by my mate who is 2 stone lighter!
catt on 30 Mar 2007
In reply to TobyA:
> (In reply to stp)
> I've heard stories of people flying up into the air due to the reduced friction.

i'd be one of those people!
Paz - on 30 Mar 2007
In reply to catt:
It was a specific early batch, ages ago. do a search.

In reply to stp:

As an occasional sport climber I find revolvers an absolute f*cking nightmare. They're the last krab in the world you want to use on the crux clip of your project
ads.ukclimbing.com
In reply to Paz: why exactly?

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.