/ REPORT: Scottish Tooling Series 2008 by Pauline Sanderson

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.
Michael Ryan - on 02 Dec 2008
If the first three events of the Scottish Series are anything to go by, there are going to be some seriously winter fit climbers on the hills right now. The series has been a great reason for people to get training early.

Pauline Sanderson reports: http://www.ukclimbing.com/articles/page.php?id=1482


The next events in the Scottish Tooling Series 2008 are at GLENMORE LODGE - Aviemore Dec 6th and the ICE FACTOR - Lochaber Dec 13th:

full details at http://www.glenmorelodge.org.uk/tooling.asp
telemarker - on 02 Dec 2008
In reply to Mick Ryan - UKClimbing.com:

Nice article but small point. I think its Ruairidh Mackenzie not Rauri Mckenzie if its the person who I think it is.

Cheers,
S
Bill Davidson - on 03 Dec 2008
In reply to Mick Ryan - UKClimbing.com:

The routes/probs at the first two comps were really good but on Sat they were superb! Big well done to Big Al & Scott for a job done good :-)
Apart from pink for feet of course :-(
3leggeddog on 04 Dec 2008
In reply to Mick Ryan - UKClimbing.com:
This series looks loads of fun. Normally I wouldnt dream of a long drive just to go to a wall but for something like this....

Anyone interested in a northern england series?

Any walls willing? Kendal wall could have some fantastic routes installed.

"Crack Club" at Cockermouth wall would be a challenge.

Am I the only person south of the border enthused by this idea?
Lord_ash2000 - on 05 Dec 2008
In reply to 3leggeddog: Don't know if you know but they have just started a dry tooling thing at one of the two 20m outdoor climbing towers at Blackpool. I've not been yet, just seen the poster.
michael83 - on 07 Dec 2008
A good round up of things so far.

I've been to all 4 rounds so far and really enjoyed it. A big thank you to all the hosting walls, event organisers and sponsors.

Special thanks from me to Marmot for the Eiger 35L rucksack i won on saturday, am well chuffed with it and can finally retire my old sack.

Looking forward to the ice factor final next week, should be ace!
fatcat - on 07 Dec 2008
In reply to 3leggeddog:

A northern england series would be great.

Get some logs up at Cockermouth and we'd be sorted.

Seriously - any interest out there ? I'm getting sick of my garage
Bill Davidson - on 07 Dec 2008
In reply to michael83:

Got a rough guide for the results?
mux - on 08 Dec 2008
In reply to fatcat:
> (In reply to 3leggeddog)
>
> A northern england series would be great.
>
> Get some logs up at Cockermouth and we'd be sorted.
>
> Seriously - any interest out there ? I'm getting sick of my garage

Id be keen old boy ?...
ozzy1978 on 09 Dec 2008 - host217-43-147-105.range217-43.btcentralplus.com
In reply to Mick Ryan - UKClimbing.com:
>

Yeah ok, I understand that it is probably good specific winter training. But am I the only one who feels that is is called "tooling" for a very obvious reason?!

In my humble opinion, ice axe and crampons should NOT be used on rock where no snow or ice exists (as illustrated by some photos in this report.)

If folk feel it really necessary to climb logs and artificial surfaces indoors to get their kicks then good on them. However is it really necessary to climb a piece of rock with "tools" when you could be doing it with your hands and feet?

It is now winter, how about sticking your "tools" into something more accommodating?

Keep it real.

Oz.







rusty_nails - on 09 Dec 2008
In reply to ozzy1978:
> (In reply to Mick Ryan - UKClimbing.com)
> [...]
>
> Yeah ok, I understand that it is probably good specific winter training. But am I the only one who feels that is is called "tooling" for a very obvious reason?!
>
> In my humble opinion, ice axe and crampons should NOT be used on rock where no snow or ice exists (as illustrated by some photos in this report.)
>
> If folk feel it really necessary to climb logs and artificial surfaces indoors to get their kicks then good on them. However is it really necessary to climb a piece of rock with "tools" when you could be doing it with your hands and feet?
>
> It is now winter, how about sticking your "tools" into something more accommodating?
>
> Keep it real.
>
> Oz.


All of the same arguments could be made against climbing on plastic indoors, but look where being able to train specifically for climbing has taken the sport. Without the ability to train, how are you meant to improve? Yes, we could all get out 2-3 times a week in winter and train on the real thing, but how many people do you know who could manage that, and how many times do the weather conditions allow us to get out regularly.

I'm afraid it is the future, and you can either embrace it, or you can stick with your ron hills and troll harness.
george mc - on 09 Dec 2008
In reply to ozzy1978:
> > In my humble opinion, ice axe and crampons should NOT be used on rock where no snow or ice exists (as illustrated by some photos in this report.)
>
> .......
> It is now winter, how about sticking your "tools" into something more accommodating?
>
>

Stick tools into something more accomodating - like doing a mixed route? Hhmm last time I did a mixed climb I seemed to mind clearing the snow to 'stick' my tools into a crack.

OOOOHHH sir!
michael83 - on 10 Dec 2008
In reply to ozzy1978:

If you want to rock climb routes that have perma-seep, some form of scum growing on them and are an absolute choss fest, go for it! You'll be the only one! (would you really want to climb that route in the photo?) Dry tooling on rock within the uk is generally only reserved for rock that no one in their right mind would want to rock climb!! Dunkeld is a perfect example.

if you want to bash tooling start a topic to the effect, this topic is about the dry tooling comps and how much fun they are :)
ozzy1978 on 15 Dec 2008 - 10.8.61.2 [inetgw-60-pri.nhs.uk]
In reply to michael83: Which crag at Dunkeld are you referring to? Polney and upper tier cave crag are certaintley not choss fests. I have done some great rock routes at both crags.

If I saw anyone dry tooling at these venues they would, putting it mildly -get a jolly good talking to.

I am sorry if I hijacked this thread and spoilt your "fun".

Oz.
Bill Davidson - on 15 Dec 2008
In reply to ozzy1978:

I think he means Birnam, well I hope so!
ozzy1978 on 15 Dec 2008 - 10.8.61.2 [inetgw-60-pri.nhs.uk]
In reply to rusty_nails:

I take your point in dry tooling being comparable to climbing on plastic holds indoors. However, climbing walls tend to breed a culture of climbers who are strong but have no experience or technique of leading on real rock outdoors. I do climb indoors during the winter - I dont find it "fun" but it keeps me fit.

Indoor climbing has become a sub-culture of rock climbing, and a sport in it's own right - I am sure that there are a proportion of climbing wall users that do climb E4 at the weekend, but there are a lot of folk still paying nine quid to crank on plastic inside on a perfect sunny winters day. I have seen this first hand when climbing in Ratho quarry.

So my arguement is - are all these folk competing in tooling comps using it as training for the hills, or is there a new sub-culture emerging? Are tooling events always held on days when the weather is rubbish? I doubt it. I bet there are a lot of punters still tooling around indoors when they could be up in the hills in good conditions.

You mentioned getting out and training on the real thing - are you confusing training with going climbing? cos thats what i'd do when the weathers good. In short, I would do a few chin up's and get out and enjoy climbing whenever possible.

Oz.
Michael Ryan - on 15 Dec 2008
In reply to ozzy1978:
> (In reply to rusty_nails)
>
> However, climbing walls tend to breed a culture of climbers who are strong but have no experience or technique of leading on real rock outdoors.

Absolute poppycock.

Walls are the main entry point for starting climbing these days and have spawned some of the World's top climbers and tens of thousands who climb outdoors on a regular basis.
ozzy1978 on 15 Dec 2008 - 10.8.61.2 [inetgw-60-pri.nhs.uk]
In reply to Bill Davidson:

Do you mean Newtyle quarry?

lesleyann - on 15 Dec 2008
In reply to ozzy1978:
I've never done dry tooling before so for me it was an excellent experience.
There are also very few experienced climbers willing to take a novice out to the hills with them to let them try it, wither it be tooling or winter routes.
With winter conditions being as they are would you be willing to give up the chance of ticking a route off your tick list that you've been wanting to do for years just to let a novice try a winter route? I don't really think you would
ozzy1978 on 15 Dec 2008 - 10.8.61.2 [inetgw-60-pri.nhs.uk]
In reply to Mick Ryan - UKClimbing.com:

I agree about an entry point and that there are lots of people who do climb outside on a regular basis who also use walls, However there is a percentage of this demographic who do not fit this criteria.

You would have to carry out a large audit of climbing wall users to establish what percentage of people belong to the indoor climbing sub - culture.

Please could you definr poppycock - it is not a word I am farmiliar with!
Jamie B - on 15 Dec 2008
In reply to ozzy1978:

> are all these folk competing in tooling comps using it as training for the hills, or is there a new sub-culture emerging?

A bit of both; on Saturday we saw a very wide range of climber types. Tooling is undoubtedly useful for climbing at the higher grades, but it shouldn't be compulsory to use it towards that if that isn't what floats your boat. Why cant it be an end in itself for some? Broad church and all that..

> Are tooling events always held on days when the weather is rubbish? I doubt it.

Hit and miss. You have absolutely no way of second guessing weather/conditions when you schedule these things, although doing so for the arse end of the autumn when people ar stuck between rock and winter mode made sense in my mind; there's not usually this much snow about!

> I bet there are a lot of punters still tooling around indoors when they could be up in the hills in good conditions.

So what? Doesnt impact on your day.


ozzy1978 on 15 Dec 2008 - 10.8.61.2 [inetgw-60-pri.nhs.uk]
In reply to lesleyann:

I'd take you out (climbing that is!) I would get a lot of satisfaction from introducing a novice to climbing. This encompasses the spirit of climbing, doing the hardest routes you can, are not always the most enjoyable times.
ozzy1978 on 15 Dec 2008 - 10.8.61.2 [inetgw-60-pri.nhs.uk]
In reply to Jamie B.:
> (In reply to ozzy1978)
>
> A Broad church and all that..
>
> >
> So what? Doesnt impact on your day.

It appears that I belong to the church, but have'nt read the bible for some time!
ozzy1978 on 15 Dec 2008 - 10.8.61.2 [inetgw-60-pri.nhs.uk]
In reply to rusty_nails:

Just for the record I do not, and have never owned a pair of ron hills!
petestack - on 15 Dec 2008
In reply to ozzy1978:

Good grief, folks, you all keep talking about 'Ron Hills' as if (your assumed target of) Tracksters was all they made. But they make all kinds of good running gear (think I've got several T-shirts, several half-zips, two pairs of gloves and, yes, two pairs of Tracksters) for, guess what, running! So forget all this stuff about whether or not you'd be seen dead in them, it's good stuff and talking generically about 'Ron Hills' is about as useful as saying 'I've got several Mountain Equipments (or Marmots, TNFs or whatever)'...
ozzy1978 on 15 Dec 2008 - 10.8.61.2 [inetgw-60-sec.nhs.uk]
In reply to petestack:

I think that when using the term "Ron Hills" most folk will know that we are referring to the iconic Tracksters.
Glenmore Lodge - on 15 Dec 2008
I took part in 4 out of the 5 tooling comps and as a consequence when I went out to climb Hidden Chimney Direct in the Corries last week, I enjoyed the climb more. I was better at using my tools in a wide variety of cracks and edges. Scottish winter climbing isn't just about hitting neve and frozen turf, it is about negociating cracks, corners, edges etc. I feel much more confident now I have watched, learnt and practiced my tooling skills in a safe environment.

This Series has reflected what climbing communities are all about. Competitiors were giving top tips to other climbers ( not thier closest rivals on the score board of course). There were cheers for the effort as well as the success.

I would like to thank everybody who took part for entering so well into the mood of the event. It has inspired and reminded me that both the young, old, beginner and pro climbers have so much in common and love to share it.

ads.ukclimbing.com
petestack - on 15 Dec 2008
In reply to ozzy1978:
> I think that when using the term "Ron Hills" most folk will know that we are referring to the iconic Tracksters.

Yes, I know that, but it's still daft!


This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.