/ How much do the pro's train?

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nolo - on 29 Dec 2008
Following on from the 'How much do you train' thread, I was wondering if anyone has any idea on the ammount of training one of the current top climbers will be doing, how many hours a week etc?


Mike

winhill - on 29 Dec 2008
In reply to nolo:

At least 10-20 minutes a day, plus one rest day in seven.
nolo - on 29 Dec 2008
In reply to winhill: I think my nan could do 10-20 minutes a day :-S
winhill - on 29 Dec 2008
In reply to nolo:
> (In reply to winhill) I think my nan could do 10-20 minutes a day :-S

What's she done on grit?
nolo - on 29 Dec 2008
In reply to winhill: Haha! Onsighted E5 yesterday, she was well chuffed!
In reply to nolo: I am guessing here but I'd imagine it's more or less full time. I'd imagine that training does not just mean running/gymwork/wall work/flexibility/etc etc, and that a lot of training is outdoors on rock. i.e. there are probably days for pro climbers where having to go to work on rock is a pain in the arse, and that some of their training sessions outdoors aren't particularly fun. Then I guess they do their fun climbing and specific stuff related to what they've been training for on top of that.

As I said, I'm guessing, but it stands to reason that all in it's a pretty full time thing, a job!
nolo - on 29 Dec 2008
In reply to nickinscottishmountains: Sounds like a lot of hard work to me!

Many Thanks!:D
biscuit - on 29 Dec 2008
In reply to nolo:

Some, like Steve Mc, claim not to train at all - unless you count climbing most days as not training. However he does seem to know a lot about it as he writes training articles.

Some, like Dave Mac, train loads - see his on line blog.

How much training they did to get to the level they are at is a different matter.

There are many amateurs out there who train more than the pro's.
nolo - on 29 Dec 2008
In reply to biscuit: So how much training did they do to get to their current level?

Is it possible to train and become as good as them, or for example, are they like Usain Bolt - Physically different to the rest of us?
In reply to nolo:
> (In reply to nickinscottishmountains) Sounds like a lot of hard work to me!
>
Well unfortunately it takes a lot of hard graft to become professional at anything in life! Including fun things!

James Oswald - on 29 Dec 2008
In reply to nolo:
I personally think it is possible to train to be as good as them. I read somewhere that Dave Mcleod views himself as not a "natural climber" and he attributes his success to hard and smart training. However I am sure it is difficult to measure whether someone is a "natural climber" (there may be indicators though).
James
Cragdog al - on 29 Dec 2008
In reply to nolo: go on ben moons website, him and rich simpson keep a training diary, or at least used too!
biscuit - on 29 Dec 2008
In reply to nolo:

Depends i am afraid.

what set david beckham, wayne rooney et al apart from their peers ?

All genetically gifted much more so than the average person but were well known for having a football permanently attached to their feet all through their childhood.

To be as good as the best in the world you need to be genetically gifted + dedicated + smart.

To climb 8a you can get away with just being dedicated.
nolo - on 29 Dec 2008
In reply to biscuit, james oswald and Cragdog al: Thanks for the replies, I guess I better get climbing then if I want to get 8a within the next few years!

Couldn't find the training diary, but the website is being changed around or something, so I will wait and see!

Thanks again!


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