/ NEWS: World Bouldering Round-Up (with video)

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.
UKC News - on 20 Feb 2009
[Dai Koyomada on Epitaf - Font 8C, 3 kb]Hard bouldering repeats from all corners of the globe have come in thick and fast in the last few weeks.

This brief report features many top names, from Dave Graham to Tyler Landman. It also includes a superb video of Tyler of Kheops (8B) in Fontainebleau.

Read more at http://www.ukclimbing.com/news/item.php?id=46144

Jonas Wiklund - on 20 Feb 2009
In reply to UKC News: Are you sure that Epitaf is on granite? I find that highly unlikely. I've only seen volcanic tuff in Hourai. It says on Koyamada's blog that the boulderproblem is on an prominent overhanging face seen from the approach to Chichi-iwa, and I cannot for the life of me remember having seen granite there.
In reply to Jonas Wiklund: Thanks Jonas, my mistake.

Now corrected.

Jack
robin mueller - on 23 Feb 2009
In reply to Jack Geldard - Editor - UKC:

Point of pedantry - I think "Epitaf" may just be the French translation; "Epitaph" in English.
James Oswald - on 23 Feb 2009
In reply to UKC News:
Good stuff.
James
James Oswald - on 23 Feb 2009
In reply to UKC News:
That Kheops looks nails. Those slopers look terrible.
Good effort from all of them.
What song is it on the Landman video?
James
TimS on 23 Feb 2009 - mailhost.pareuro.com
In reply to UKC News: Nice, may be worth updating now Ty has done the sit starts to Gecko and Kheops, both 8B+ - monster!
seagull on 23 Feb 2009
In reply to TimS:

And nearly flashed Partage, ripped a hold off it and climbed it next go. Amazing stuff.
Jonas Wiklund - on 25 Feb 2009
In reply to robin mueller: Point of even worse pedantry: the original name of Koyamadas boulderproblem is transcribed "Epitafu" using standard transcription to Latin letters, since that is pretty much how the word is pronounced except that the last u is likely to be very suppressed. (Epitafu of course means "epitaph" which is of Greek origin. Épitaphe in french.) I would probably transcribe the name of the boulderproblem as Epitaf if I had to translate Koyamada's blog to English for instance.
Chris F - on 25 Feb 2009
In reply to UKC News: Also, as clarification, as Peter Beal makes reference to Boulder in his blog, I suspect the new prob is at Flagstaff Mountain, near Boulder CO, not Flagstaff AZ.
robin mueller - on 25 Feb 2009
In reply to Jonas Wiklund:
> (In reply to robin mueller) Point of even worse pedantry: the original name of Koyamadas boulderproblem is transcribed "Epitafu" using standard transcription to Latin letters, since that is pretty much how the word is pronounced except that the last u is likely to be very suppressed. (Epitafu of course means "epitaph" which is of Greek origin. Épitaphe in french.) I would probably transcribe the name of the boulderproblem as Epitaf if I had to translate Koyamada's blog to English for instance.

Not sure I follow. Why would you go for a non-word, when "Epitaph" is the exact translation?

Jonas Wiklund - on 25 Feb 2009
In reply to robin mueller: Because "Epitaf(u)" is the name of something, not just any word. The route "Biographie" at Ceuse is still referred to as such and not "Biography" even if that would be an exact translation.
robin mueller - on 26 Feb 2009
In reply to Jonas Wiklund:

Right. But Epitaf is not a word. Epitafu makes sense, but knocking off the u so people don't make pronounciation errors is like spelling Biographie Beeografee.

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.