/ NEWS: Stanage - Ring Ouzels 2009

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Adam Long - on 10 Apr 2009
The Ring Ouzels are back and have started nest building in the Green Crack area. As of today (signs should be in place by tomorrow) there will be a restriction on climbing extending from April Crack to Narrow Buttress.

This is a traditional site and the restricted area is the same as in previous years. As yet this is the first pair building; if more appear other restrictions may be put in place. Likewise pairs sometimes move so restrictions may be removed. If in doubt, please follow the on site signs and keep an eye on this thread which I'll keep up to date.

Following last year's poor breeding season Ouzel numbers are low and this could be a critical year. Your cooperation will be much appreciated.

Cheers,

Adam

UKC Staff Edit:

Now on the news page:http://www.ukclimbing.com/news/item.php?id=46883
GIPFEL on 12 Apr 2009 - 78.144.71.58 whois?
In reply to Adam L: Is the enjoyment one gets from seeing ring ouzels far outweighed by the enjoyment one could get by climbing in these areas?
Simon - on 13 Apr 2009
In reply to GIPFEL:
> (In reply to Adam L) Is the enjoyment one gets from seeing ring ouzels far outweighed by the enjoyment one could get by climbing in these areas?

We have to abide by the restictions - your question could be construed in many a way...


I'm sure you're abridged with the facts & realise the consequences?

GIPFEL on 13 Apr 2009 - 78.144.71.58 whois?
In reply to Simon: consequences of losing an insignificant species that is doomed anyway?
Oli - on 13 Apr 2009
In reply to GIPFEL:
> (In reply to Adam L) Is the enjoyment one gets from seeing ring ouzels far outweighed by the enjoyment one could get by climbing in these areas?

You're a complete tw*t Franco, you really are.
GIPFEL on 13 Apr 2009 - 78.144.71.58 whois?
In reply to Oli: franco? who is that?

this is a legitimate question that few seem able to answer. Leave the swearing and abuse for a while and explain to me why ring ouzels need protecting.
fatsloper - on 13 Apr 2009
In reply to GIPFEL:
Species require protecting to ensure the food chains, habitat and ultimately the environment stay as rich and diverse as possible. Where have you been for the last 20 years?

Do you walk to and from the crag with your eyes shut or do you enjoy what's going on around you?
GIPFEL on 13 Apr 2009 - 78.144.71.58 whois?
In reply to fatsloper: I understand that most moorland habbitats are completely man made and what is important to me is that life continues (as it always does) what form this life takes is to me irrelevant and conservation seems to have been transformed into personal wars for some people and more of a lifestyle choice than an actual care.
fatsloper - on 13 Apr 2009
In reply to GIPFEL:
Whilst I agree that all habitats have been influenced at some level by man and that life always continues, what's the harm in restricting you movements for a couple of weeks each year. There are other places to go, new experiences to try.
I would also hate to think all the habitat creation/management and species conservation I have been involved in was some type of war and not that I passionately wanted to save our countryside.
jezb1 - on 13 Apr 2009
In reply to Adam L: I can't believe that anyone who loves the outdoors could have the view that bird bans like this are a bad thing.

I think its actually quite sad :(
GIPFEL on 13 Apr 2009 - 78.144.71.58 whois?
In reply to fatsloper: i'd put up with a couple of weeks of ban for the possibility that I was wrong about this, but if i drove somewhere for many hours, to find the route i had my hearst set on was under a bird ban it would probably not stop me.
GIPFEL on 13 Apr 2009 - 78.144.71.58 whois?
In reply to jezb1: and why do you think that? the beauty of nature is not it's dependence on man.
tompilgrem - on 13 Apr 2009
In reply to GIPFEL: you can't excantly complain that a small section of our biggest cliff in the country and probaly the most densly pack crags in the world has bin shut off. Not exactly going to be able to climb nothing for the whole year are ya??
Also, it's the birds habitat that were climbing on, noth our habitat that there nesting on !!
James Jackson on 13 Apr 2009
In reply to GIPFEL:
> But if i drove somewhere for many hours, to find the route i had my hearst set on was under a bird ban it would probably not stop me.

Well, you should have checked the RAD before you drove for hours, shouldn't you? It's also arrogant (and also sometimes illegal!) behavior like that which loses crag access for *everybody*.
Monk - on 14 Apr 2009
In reply to GIPFEL:
> (In reply to fatsloper) i'd put up with a couple of weeks of ban for the possibility that I was wrong about this, but if i drove somewhere for many hours, to find the route i had my hearst set on was under a bird ban it would probably not stop me.

If you did that and it was a peregrine nesting there, then you could land yourself with a very hefty fine. It is illegal to disturd protected bird's nests.
Irk the Purist - on 14 Apr 2009
In reply to GIPFEL:

"Is the enjoyment one gets from seeing ring ouzels far outweighed by the enjoyment one could get by climbing in these areas?"

That depends. Are you a ring ouzel or a climber?


practicalcat on 14 Apr 2009
In reply to GIPFEL:
I am sure that there are many people who walk along Stanage Edge who get more pleasure from watching the ring ouzels than watching the climbers. I know it's hard to imagine, but life is not just about the rights of climbers.
Kipper-Phil Smith - on 14 Apr 2009
In reply to GIPFEL:
> (In reply to Oli) franco? who is that?
>
> this is a legitimate question that few seem able to answer. Leave the swearing and abuse for a while and explain to me why ring ouzels need protecting.

Ring Ouzel is included on the Red List of Birds of Conservation Concern for a definition of what this means go to

http://www.rspb.org.uk/wildlife/birdguide/status_explained.asp

It makes me sad to read your comments on this site and ashamed that the climbing community contains people who are as selfish as you.

If climbers do not observe bird bans the outcome will be that climbers will be banned from the cliffs and rightly so. Fortunately the overwhealming majority of climbers are not like yourself. The current arrangements work well the climbers get to use the cliffs most of the time but withdraw when the needs of wildlife are greater than our our own.

If you behave in the manner that you suggest you may get to climb your chosen route at your chosen time and get us all banned from climbing it at a future date so just think and act responsibly please!!!!!!
ring ouzel on 14 Apr 2009
In reply to Eric the Red: I think I'm both Eric! I have alerted the rest of my family to the arrival of any GIMPS, sorry, GIPFELs and we are currently storing a large amount of...justice to serve to him, or rather, on top of him.
Ackbar - on 14 Apr 2009
In reply to Adam L: I was down at stanage on the monday and went over to the Rim Area to check out the bouldering, however I saw quite a few ouzels flying around (I think 3 individuals, or just 1 cunning ouzel). There was a sign nearby asking people not to use the lower path. I wasn't sure if this meant the bouldering was also out of bounds but I decided to head on over to the plantation instead. Bit gutted but a small sacrifice really.

So what is the deal? Are we susposed to avoid nesting areas or any area where you spot one?
tompilgrem - on 14 Apr 2009
In reply to Ackbar:
> So what is the deal? Are we susposed to avoid nesting areas or any area where you spot one?

Just the area inbetween the two signs. The relevant area is in the first message of the tread. I agree with you, a little gutted but it is a small price to pay when you consider all other areas on Stanage and all other crags in area.
Just wish that everyone felt that way (Gipfel!)
Graham Hoey - on 16 Apr 2009
In reply to Adam L:

Personally I've always enjoyed seeing Ring Ouzels on the quiet areas of Stange, normally alone early morning or late evenings. They are all part of the solo experience.
Cheers
Graham
Adders - on 01 May 2009
In reply to Ackbar: i've seen ring ouzels around the rim bouldering area too in the last few years. Likewise i was a little confused if i was allowed there or if it just meant not to go on the lower path.

I think its the latter and the top bouldering area is ok as long as your sensible.

Orlov - on 04 May 2009
In reply to Adam L:

couldn't we just paint some black birds?
Ewan Richards - on 10 May 2009
In reply to GIPFEL:

I thought that part of the ethic of Trad climbing was 'leave as you found'. This does not just apply to gear and holds....

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