/ NEW REVIEW: Travellunch Sampled by CarolineMc

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[Looking apprehensive with the first spork full of the lovely Risotto, 3 kb]My lasting memory of dehydrated expedition food is a Raven Chili-con-Carne, eaten somewhere near the Cheviot in 1992. Anyone else whos tried this, er, delicacy is likely to agree that it is an experience not to be repeated! Hence my further forays into the world of dried food have generally been limited to Bachelors Pasta n Sauce and the occasional bowl of noodles served at Awesome Walls. So, bring forth the Travellunch test - three silver foil packages promising tasty meals with minimum fuss. Weighing in at just 125g, they were certainly light, easy and convenient to make! But were they any good...?!

Read more at http://www.ukclimbing.com/gear/review.php?id=2019
EZ on 10 Aug 2009
In reply to UKC Gear:

How disgusting!!! Here is an ingredients list and some comments about a few of the ingredients.

Travellunch Energy Muesli:

Ingredients:
Rolled oats, whey protein, (20%), whole milk powder, sultanas, honey, maltodextrin,sugar, hazelnut croquant, raisins, rice, wheat flakes, malt extract, dates, strawberries, sunflower seeds,apples, banana, flavouring, whey product, acidifier: citric acid.

1) whey protein - This is a hydrolyzed product that contains free glutamic acid

2) maltodextrin - This may contain MSG and/or MSG may be produced during processing.

3) malt extract - As for maltodextrin.

4) flavouring - This could be ANY NUMBER OF UN-NAMED CHEMICALS that have been allowed, because of political lobbying by the chemical and food industries, to remain unlisted individually.

Please look this up for yourself.

Free glutamates and glutamic acid (of which MSG is the most famous example and is known by many many other names)...

Are excitotoxins that cause nerve damage in the brain.
They cause brain lesions (meaning that they kill brain cells). They cause retinal damage (meaning that the ability to process light received into the eye is impaired.

Cause hypothalamus lesions (The hypothalamus acts upon the pituitary gland to control the release of hormones and within itself affects the regulation of temperature in the body.)

Cause, through the impairment of hormonal functions, damage to the ability to control appetite and most people who eat unnatural glutamates will leave the meal unsatisfied and wanting more food shortly afterwards. They are also addictive and are the most common cause of obesity in today's society. Just look around you! Ever wondered why "When you pop, you can't stop"???

I appreciate that people have choices and that this type of product may be appropriate for, amongst others, those who do not care about their health and so I offer this information only as a platform for those who are interested to use as a starting point for doing their own research.

To say that something is GM free and provides x number of grams of some nutritional aspect and y number of grams of another is just a distraction to stall the reader from looker further into what the ingredients actually are.

Good luck and stay healthy.
captain paranoia - on 10 Aug 2009
In reply to EZ:

> and so I offer this information only as a platform for those who are interested to use as a starting point for doing their own research.

Whilst I try to avoid MSG wherever possible, because I came to realise that it did odd things to me, would you have any good starting points for this research; you've made a lot of interesting points without any references. Perferably peer-reviewed references.

Thanks.

I certainly agree with the point about labelling, and the 'hidden' ingredients lurking under the catch-all 'flavouring'. I'd much rather know what's in the packet in clear terms.
ginger_lord - on 10 Aug 2009
In reply to EZ:
> To say that something is GM free and provides x number of grams of some nutritional aspect and y number of grams of another is just a distraction to stall the reader from looker further into what the ingredients actually are.
>
> Good luck and stay healthy.

And remember folks, don't drink too much water else you'll die from that as well.

Whilst there are certain things in food you buy that aren't the best, eating stuff like this is hardly going to kill you.



CarolineMc - on 10 Aug 2009
In reply to EZ: Thankfully the one I tested has slightly less worrying ingredients...
Rolled oats, chocolate (17%), whole milk powder, sugar, honey, maltodextrin, wholemeal oat flour, corn starch, Malt extrakt, hazelnut croquant, salt.

Yep, Maltodextrin can be MSG but it's in a very small quantity here. Corn starch, I think, is not too bad in the nasty stakes (waiting now to be flamed) and again it's in a very small quantity. I was just pleased that salt played such a small part after the rice and pasta!!

C-:
EZ on 10 Aug 2009
In reply to captain paranoia:

Nice name mate.

Peer reviewed articles are generally peer reviewed in order to publish which means that one would have to have a subscription to the relevant journal in order to get access to their archives. Of course your local medical library may have some of the journals listed at this site:
http://www.truthinlabeling.org/hiddensources.htm
The data is extensive.

I avoid MSG full stop (having learned all of the pseudonyms that it hides under)... and 'flavouring' and 'natural flavouring' and 'spices' and well anything else that doesn't tell me what it is. Aspartame and aculsfame K are another leading major nasty, and they are in nearly every soft drink that you can imagine and definitely are in drinks that quote themselves as 'sugar free' or 'diet'. They become the exceptionally carcinogenic formaldehyde when the body digests them. The other major playerus horribilis is 'glucose fructose syrup' also know as inverted and partially inverted sugar syrup and known in the USA as 'high fructose corn syrup'. It causes liver disfunction and obesity. Lastly my major player list concludes with Soy(a) which has an estrogen mimicking effect that can cause post-menopausal osteoperosis in women and hormonal imbalance in men and women. There are others but this is a climbing forum :-) hehe (got a few out there again:-)

My recomendation to everyone is to read the ingredients of everything that you eat and bit by bit read about all of the items that are not something that (euphemistically) can be grown in the ground. A good method is to scroogle (scroogle.org/scraper.html - google results without the tracking of google's "persistent cookie") the ingredient and add the word 'toxic' at the end. Then just remember that not everything we read is true (even science journals) and look for corroburrating evidence to everything that you are not happy with.

I live a fabulous diet with no difficulty and everything I find out interests me so a double wammy.
EZ on 10 Aug 2009
In reply to ginger_lord:

> And remember folks, don't drink too much water else you'll die from that as well.

I drink mostly Buxton water from the spring in Buxton Crescent. I disagree that the water will kill you, that is just silly :-) but look up what the fluoride is doing to you, 'cause it ain't fixing your teeth up!

> Whilst there are certain things in food you buy that aren't the best, eating stuff like this is hardly going to kill you.

I wouldn't be too sure there! Poisons can be fast and slow acting and some are accumulative and never removed from the body, like formaldehyde.

ginger_lord - on 10 Aug 2009
In reply to EZ:
I disagree that the water will kill you, that is just silly :-)

Silly but true:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Water_intoxication

Mr Lopez - on 10 Aug 2009
In reply to EZ:
ocd...?
EZ on 10 Aug 2009
In reply to ginger_lord:

Funny mate. I never knew!
EZ on 10 Aug 2009
In reply to Mr Lopez:

doesn't ocd imply an inability to function correctly in light of compulsive behaviour? I'm not obsessed.

Paranoia...you only have to be right once to make it all worthwhile! - Unknown
Will Hunt - on 12 Aug 2009
In reply to EZ:

That may as well not have been written. Not until I've seen the independent academic studies with no significant methodological flaws.
EZ on 12 Aug 2009
In reply to Will Hunt:

If you need some "expert" to give you your details on a plate before you look for the data for yourself, then that is not research. Research is looking at other peoples data from all angles of a topic, both the affirming and non-affirming views relative to one's opinion (there is no such thing as true objectivity).

If you are asking who can you trust then all you are really saying is "who can do my thinking for me?" And if you are saying that only 'independent' (nobody is truly independent) 'academic' (implying that they have been confirmed through the doctrine of academia to have valid opinions) studies with no 'significant methodological flaws' (by who's criteria do any flaws have methodological significance - even in truly 'double blind' peer reviews this is missing the point because the same academia that produced the study is reviewing the data. Just because it is a different person doesn't mean that they are not a product of the same school of thought) are the only way that you will accept information then keep watching the box and reading the rags and one day someone will sell you a bridge.

What I actually advocate as one of my posts states is "just remember that not everything we read is true (even science journals) and [to] look for corroburrating evidence to everything that you are not happy with."

If you wait for a corrupt world to tell you that they are the wolf about to eat you you will die by the jaws of a wolf. I know what I know because I read... lots.. and sure I may be mistaken about some of it but at least I am looking for myself. Do the same.
EZ on 12 Aug 2009
In reply to Will Hunt: and while we are at it...

http://www.truthinlabeling.org/hiddensources.htm

That site quotes published data going back as far as 1969 detailing how laboratory animals were very notably adversely affected by MSG. read read read...


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