/ NEW ARTICLE: Hand and Foot Care

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UKC Articles - on 09 Sep 2009
[Hands, 2 kb]The abrasive nature of the rock combined with the moisture-absorbing properties of chalk will dry your skin out. When your skin is dry it is more prone to wear and cuts. As soon as you finish climbing, wash your hands and use a skin moisturiser as often as possible. Creams with healing vitamin E and a moisturiser can be be bought at any chemist. The best creams contain Shea butter. Popular are CLIMB ON's creams and bars, SYPELAND's Climbers' Balm and PALMER'S Cocoa butter.

Your feet. Do they smell? This article has tips on how to avoid the smelly-rock-shoe syndrome.

Read more at http://www.ukclimbing.com/articles/page.php?id=2089
Nic on 09 Sep 2009
In reply to UKC Articles:

> The following article is based on text from the book Sport CLIMBING + published by Rockfax

I hear the sound of barrels being scraped...
Tall Clare - on 09 Sep 2009
In reply to Nic:

I, however, am enjoying the word 'avulsion' this morning.
Horse on 09 Sep 2009
In reply to Tall Clare:

Your enjoyment might be lessened if you search for "skin avulsion" in google images.
Tall Clare - on 09 Sep 2009
In reply to Horse:

I don't think I'm going to do that, if it's all the same to you.
Nic on 09 Sep 2009
In reply to Tall Clare:

...and I thought it was something you bought at B&Q ...
rogpeppe - on 09 Sep 2009
superglue does not seem to be a carcinogen, says a quick research on the internet, although it can cause irritation. see http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/2187/was-super-glue-invented-to-seal-battle-wounds-in-vietn...
Fume Troll on 09 Sep 2009
In reply to UKC Articles:
> Creams with healing vitamin E and a moisturiser can be be bought at any chemist.

Indeed. But is there any evidence for this healing? None that I can find.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tocopherol#Topical_use

Cotton socks are about the best thing for promoting the conditions that fungus likes to grow in - they trap moisture against the skin and let it get warm and wet. Synthetic, wicking socks are far better in this regard.

http://www.ehow.com/how_5010641_stop-sweaty-feet.html

Cheers,

FT.

mkean - on 09 Sep 2009
In reply to Fume Troll:
I've tested the effects of Vitamin E based preparations on skin and they do work.* I should point out that the concentration of Vit.E that I was using was vastly higher than any commercially available preparation.
I tested a bog standard moisturiser, Climb On and my own Vit E preparation there was a noticeable improvement from
no moisturiser<moisturiser<Climb On<<Conc. Vit. E



*I'm a research chemist.
Fume Troll on 09 Sep 2009
In reply to mkean: I've tried using the "juice" out of vitamin E capsules...

Did you publish anything on the research?

Cheers,

FT.
nbonnett - on 09 Sep 2009
In reply to Fume Troll:

tea tree oil helps to get rid of athletes foot, (got fined by the MHRA for claiming it on a product once many years ago ).
ads.ukclimbing.com
mkean - on 09 Sep 2009
In reply to Fume Troll:
No it was done entirely off my own back* so to speak, mainly because organising human trials can be tricky. Wouldn't be nearly enough to publish on.
*Mostly other places which were easier to reach.

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