/ Zero G ropes - what do people think?

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Dan Lane - on 10 Nov 2009


Me and a friend are going to buy a pair of half ropes and take one each soon, but we cant decide which ropes to get. I was thinking of the Zero G G-string (140, usually 190), but he was claiming they are not good ropes?

The Zero G ropes are 46g/m as opposed to the 48g/m of the Mammut Genesis, and have an impact force of 5.5kn rather than 6.3.

If it makes any difference we climb, usually on grit, three or four times a week if possible. So what ever ropes we get, they're not going to last for an age.

So opinions of the Zero G G-string please, rather than telling me about other ropes.

Thanks
Dan
Blue Straggler - on 10 Nov 2009
In reply to dan lane:

I've had a pair for nearly 3 years, they are fine. I've used them a lot and they've lasted well. The dry treatment may have somehow scrubbed off after 2 years, as they seemed to be soaking up the ice water at Idwal Stream last winter, but that's fair enough after 2 years.
5cifi - BAD SELLER - on 10 Nov 2009
BennoC - on 10 Nov 2009
In reply to dan lane:

Hi Dan,

My half ropes are g-strings. We climbed with them at hobson moor if you remember. They don't handle as well as some but are good value.
Pittsburgh Windmill on 10 Nov 2009
In reply to dan lane: http://www.urbanrock.com/products_show.php?ParentId=119&CatId=151&SearchType=2

beal cobra 50m pair deal @ 160, I have them and they handle well and seem durable so far.
Monk - on 10 Nov 2009
In reply to dan lane:

I've been pleasantly surprised by the Zero-G ropes. I find that they handle well and are good to climb with.
Mark Stevenson - on 10 Nov 2009
In reply to dan lane: Several things:

- The number of UIAA test falls that the rope holds is probably the lowest of any on the market currently but still 60% higher than the minimum needed.
- It probably didn't pass the now withdrawn sharp edge test.
- The rope has no advanced coating to reduce wear.

The first and second won't make any practical difference to you whatsoever as the biggest risk on grit is extreme abrasion. The third might, but only if you are comparing it with coated ropes (Edelweiss/Perdur treatment, Edelrid/BS treatment) rather than another non-coated rope. Even then the jury is out on how much difference there is.

However, in terms of handling that is a very subjective thing as well as being probably more important that the exact number of UIAA test falls. Depending on your point of view it is likely you may find that the G-String handles better than as a Genesis as they tend slightly towards the stiffer side. Edelweiss and Edelrid generally have a good reputation for handling well.

Certainly my criteria for a rope are in order of priority:
- Good handling
- Features/spec
- Price

If your partners is worried you can buy Genesis for 73.39 each (Taunton Leisure) or Edelrid Kestrel BS for 82.00 each (Rock & Run http://www.rockrun.com/products-Kestrel-BS-8.5mm-x-50m_CL-RO-KBS5.htm )

Finally I would actually question why you're buying double ropes for Gritstone but you could seriously consider buying a 60m or 70m rope and then cutting it in two. You can get a 60m Edelrid Kestrel for 100 from Rock and Run or 70m for 128 from Jo Royle http://jo-royle.co.uk.
jesatu - on 10 Nov 2009
In reply to Mark Stevenson:
> Finally I would actually question why you're buying double ropes for Gritstone but you could seriously consider buying a 60m or 70m rope and then cutting it in two.

Genuine question here - what advantages do you get from cutting the rope into two rather than doubling it over?


Poco Loco - on 10 Nov 2009
In reply to jesatu:

Yeah, a doubled 60m half rope would be much less faff for grit routes. You don't really want to lug around 100-120m of rope for 15-20m routes ;)
Dan Lane - on 10 Nov 2009
In reply to Mark Stevenson:

Good point, but i plan to have some weekends away to placers like the lakes and wales, so 50m is needed really.
Mark Stevenson - on 10 Nov 2009
In reply to jesatu:
> Genuine question here - what advantages do you get from cutting the rope into two rather than doubling it over?

Your general handling, coiling and back-stacking is quicker and easier. A badly tangled 70m will take ages, at least 2-3 times as long, to untangle as a two 35m ropes.

Methods for the second to tie-in doubled aren't ideal.

Climbing on a doubled rope generally results in some twists accumulating at the second's end in the middle of the rope. If you only do it occasionally it isn't an issue, but it can be a real issue if it is always used that way.

You can't climb properly as a 3 on double rope.

You can split the rope between two people if you cut it.

It gives you two great scrambling or alpine walking ropes.


It's not something I can see many people doing but it's a option, especially if you were to cut a skinny single rope like a Beal Joker 9.1mm which can be used as both a Single or a Half rope.

Mark Stevenson - on 10 Nov 2009
In reply to dan lane: The main thing to realise is that these days there aren't any poor ropes on sale. I'm using Edelweiss currently but there aren't any great deals on them in the 8.5-9mm range presently.

Just be aware when asking for recommendations on here or amongst fellow climbers. Most people only climb on their own rope, so even if they say it is great, they may have little objectivity about whether others are better. So the question is, are ropes being recommended because they are ok but very popular or because they are actually really good?
Monk - on 10 Nov 2009
In reply to Mark Stevenson:

>
> Just be aware when asking for recommendations on here or amongst fellow climbers. Most people only climb on their own rope, so even if they say it is great, they may have little objectivity about whether others are better. So the question is, are ropes being recommended because they are ok but very popular or because they are actually really good?

As usual, Mark Stevenson is offering good and well balanced advice and mentions a good point, and I usually qualify my opinion when I give my recommendation. In light of that comment, I will just add that I use a very wide range of ropes from my time as kit officer of a climbing club, occasional climbing instructor, climbing with multiple partners and personal use (worryingly, I discovered that i have 10 ropes for personal use!) I still think the Zero Gs are decent budget ropes that handle well for general cragging. If I hadn't found a very good deal on my latest Beal ropes, then I was going to buy a pair for my own use.
Wallm0nkey - on 10 Nov 2009
In reply to dan lane: I climbed a fair bit on my mates Zero G halfs this summer and I didn't find them bad at all. They took a serious amount of abuse as he was using them near enough constantly they were still doing well at the end of the summer. Seem like a good option for the money to me!
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Dan Lane - on 10 Nov 2009
In reply to All:

Thanks everyone, now i have to persuade my friend that they are just as good as any other rope.

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