/ NEW REVIEW: VIDEO REVIEW: Jet Boil Personal Cooking System

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[Ian Wilson using the Jetboil 6 pitches up the Hallucinogen Wall, Colorado., 2 kb] UKC Editor Jack Geldard reviews the JetBoil Personal Cooking System:

"The fact that the stove is so easily hang-able and that it all fits together in to a solid one-piece unit make it extremely usable in a big wall situation."

Read more at http://www.ukclimbing.com/gear/review.php?id=2433

5cifi - BAD SELLER - on 02 Feb 2010
In reply to UKC Gear: Whats stabililty like when its being used during windy conditions ?

How good is it at protection from the wind ?
Michael Ryan - on 02 Feb 2010
In reply to 5cifi:

Jack is away. Anyone like to answer 5cifi's questions?
Tom_Harding - on 02 Feb 2010
In reply to 5cifi: Wind resistence is pretty rubbish really and being very tall and slim you need to keep hold of it. I genrally put my back to the wind and sit cross legged with it between my legs. If you want wind resistence go for the MSR reactor (although you have to get it lit and put the pot on before it is totally wind proof).
5cifi - BAD SELLER - on 02 Feb 2010
In reply to Tom_Harding: Thanks pal. I tend to carry an MSR XGK withme with the optional windshield. I was thinking of buying a smaller unit, but fairly wind resistance like the MSR. I quite like the look and spec of the Primus ETA Packlite Stove. Going to look at some tomorrow. Thanks for the advice
jas wood - on 04 Feb 2010
In reply to 5cifi: i think its worth pointing out when it is windy i will sit with back to the wind and actually hold the stove by the handle to keep it out of the wind and also warm my pinkies.

for a couple of nights out i cannot see anything lighter and more compact (basically all you need is a spoon) but do a sunday dinner at casstle rigg it won't !!
gethin_allen on 06 Feb 2010
In reply to UKC Gear:
The one thing I would really like jetboil to make is a slightly larger version with a mug that would hold ~1.5 l and could store a 250gm canister.
With a internal diameter of 11 cm (to fit the canister) the cooking pot would only need to be ~16 cm high so overall the system would still be very compact. Also the extra capacity could be used to fit the hanging system in.
znewsham - on 06 Feb 2010
In reply to Tom_Harding: I would have said the opposite, the MSR reactor's pot doesnt attach to the base, and from what I gather it doesnt have support legs either, the jetboil almost screws together, and the stand spreads out to keep it stable. Not had any problems with it yet, and I have used it in some pretty hefty winds.
Arjen - on 06 Feb 2010
In reply to jas wood:

> for a couple of nights out i cannot see anything lighter and more compact (basically all you need is a spoon) but do a sunday dinner at casstle rigg it won't !!

There are plenty of other stoves that are much more lightweight than the jetboil. Cheaper too.
Unless you plan to stay away for a long time it is a false economy, both on the weight and the price.
A pocket rocket and a pan cost and weight FAR less than this jetboil thingy, and doesn't take that much more space.

I don't get it how people fall for the marketing, the thing weighs 425g, without gas!! That is NOT lightweight in my book.
owrehleeoh on 06 Feb 2010
In reply to UKC Gear:

I've had one of these for just over a year now to supplement my MSR Dragonfly. I'd say the following about it ....

1. I'm one of those poor souls for whom the igniter is a bit flaky. So I carry a small lighter in the base just in case. I found one which fits inside the heat exchange when packing along with a few tea bags in a plastic bag.

2. The heat exchanger is awsome. The result is that even on full chat, put your hand above the server and you feel very little heat coming off. A 100g canister seems to last an inordinate amount of time so I'd say it's very efficient.

3. Stability is poor if placed on the ground. You always have to find (or make) a flat spot, and even a light wind will knock it over. I'm tempted to buy a hanging kit even though I don't big wall climb.

4. The effort it takes to get it out of your bag, assemble, light, and heat some water is a fraction of the pfaff you get with most other stoves so it's brilliant for slinging in a pack ready to make a cup of tea at the crag.

5. I car camp a reasonable amount with three kids. For heating water etc I just hand it to my 10 year old and he is able to use it very safely, the combination of the piezo lighter and lock together construction is great. I'd never do that with the dragonfly !

I would definitely recommend this stove with the following two provisos.

A. It is expensive. Is it worth what it costs ? If I lost it I'd replace it with another one without a second thought, but then I can afford to blow 65 on a non essential.

B. Actual cooking in this thing (rather than water heating and boil in the bag stuff) is a bit of a pain as it has a very tall narrow shape. I'd recommend buying something like an alpkit loon and even then it's something you do out of necessity rather than for fun :)

jas wood - on 06 Feb 2010
In reply to owrehleeoh: you can now get a pack which has a stabiliser for the base and also an attachment to convert it into a normal stove making it more versatile for cooking.

i love mine to bits but i'm not a fussy eater !
winhill - on 06 Feb 2010
In reply to Arjen:
> (In reply to jas wood)
> for a couple of nights out i cannot see anything lighter



> There are plenty of other stoves that are much more lightweight than the jetboil. Cheaper too.
>
> I don't get it how people fall for the marketing, the thing weighs 425g, without gas!! That is NOT lightweight in my book.

Yup, happens every time these things come up.
owrehleeoh on 06 Feb 2010
In reply to winhill:

I'd agree that if your primary criteria is weight I wouldn't get a Jetboil PCS.
However the lighter options are typically not as efficient (lack of 'heavy' heat exchanger), or as user friendly (the way it all locks together and can be moved as a lump is unexpectedly useful).

The weight weeny's should look at a Ti cup, pocket rocket combo or similar.

A
jas wood - on 06 Feb 2010
In reply to Arjen: other stoves require a pan to eat from do they not ? jet boil needs nothing but a spoon and fodder ! I have noticed on many multi day climbs people use the jetboil.

it is a simple compact light and very very efficient system and if you don't like them don't get one !
ranger on 07 Feb 2010 - 89.240.74.165 whois?
In reply to jas wood: as na
an ex welder you can do this
Arjen - on 07 Feb 2010
In reply to jas wood:
> (In reply to Arjen) other stoves require a pan to eat from do they not ? jet boil needs nothing but a spoon and fodder ! I have noticed on many multi day climbs people use the jetboil.
>
> it is a simple compact light and very very efficient system and if you don't like them don't get one !

I'm sure it is easy to use and convenient, but I went against your assertion that:

> for a couple of nights out i cannot see anything lighter and more compact

This not true - something along the lines of a MytiMug with a pocket rocket is possibly as compact and definitely lighter...

Sure, its a neat bit of kit with some advantages as owrehleeoh (had to copy-paste that...) pointed out, but it is not lightweight.

Ah well, I guess kudo's for jetboil's marketing machine... ;)
owrehleeoh on 07 Feb 2010
In reply to Arjen:

I'm still trying to work out why I said "server" instead of "cooker" !
Really must climb more and work less :)

A
rusty_nails - on 07 Feb 2010
In reply to Arjen:
> (In reply to jas wood)
>
> [...]
> A pocket rocket and a pan cost and weight FAR less than this jetboil thingy, and doesn't take that much more space.
>
> I don't get it how people fall for the marketing, the thing weighs 425g, without gas!! That is NOT lightweight in my book.

Have you ever tried one?

They are black magic!

Why would you want to hump a pan around with you, and wait 15 minutes for your water to even start bubbling?

The jetboil is a one stop solution to speed, efficieny and ease of use. Why do you think the majority of the British army choose them?

Boil in the bag is done in 5 mins, leaving you with a mug of hot water to make a brew with. Dead simple, dead effective, and in my bag!

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