/ NEW ARTICLE: Better Mountain Photography Part 2

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UKC Articles - on 04 Nov 2010
Better Mountain Photography 1, 3 kbSean Kelly is a keen climbing and mountain photographer. His photos have appeared in several climbing guidebooks, and he has a stunning gallery on UKC.

In this technical article, Sean takes us through different techniques of photo manipulation using Adobe Photoshop.

Read more at http://www.ukclimbing.com/articles/page.php?id=3151

pishmishy - on 04 Nov 2010
For such a useful article on digital photography it's disappointing that most of the screen shots look as if they've been dropped to an indexed palatte before being converted back to RGB images resulting in horrible banding of colours.

Also some of the subtitles require editing...

'Rotation & Cropping of the imageIf' -> 'Rotation & Cropping of the image If'
'Exposure control of Dynamic Range using Levels & Curves' -> 'Exposure control using Levels & Curves'
'Resolutionfor Screen' -> 'Resolution for Screen'
'Re-sizing the Image smaller' -> 'Reducing the image'
'Re-sizing the Image bigger' -> 'Enlarging the image'

Also:

'standardPhotoshop' -> 'standard Photoshop'
JPEG inconsistently written as JPEG jpeg and J-PEG.

ChrisJD on 04 Nov 2010
In reply to pishmishy:

Does any of this 'actually' matter. Its free copy, not a paid for book!


And well done to Sean for taking all the time to work on this.
Andy Stephenson - on 04 Nov 2010
In reply to UKC Articles: I've had a quick read, and it looks like an excellent article: thanks. I'm sure that many amateur dabblers eventually find their own way of producing finished work using Photoshop, but this explains in detail some of the best ways to achieve the results we want. I've used Photoshop for years but learnt a couple of very useful tips straight away.
Dave Foster - on 04 Nov 2010
In reply to UKC Articles: Thanks Sean, tons of great info, almost a reference! I'll be copying and referring in future.
Sam W - on 04 Nov 2010
In reply to UKC Articles:
Thanks Sean, I've been looking for an article like this for ages now, covers the basics without being oversimplified
Fraser on 04 Nov 2010
In reply to UKC Articles:

Good effort by SK - thanks for taking the time to write this up. I'll definitely be using some of this for reference.
osh on 04 Nov 2010
In reply to UKC Articles: Excellent!
Sean Kelly - on 04 Nov 2010
In reply to pishmishy:
> For such a useful article on digital photography it's disappointing that most of the screen shots look as if they've been dropped to an indexed palatte before being converted back to RGB images resulting in horrible banding of colours.
>
> Also some of the subtitles require editing...
>
> 'Rotation & Cropping of the imageIf' -> 'Rotation & Cropping of the image If'
> 'Exposure control of Dynamic Range using Levels & Curves' -> 'Exposure control using Levels & Curves'
> 'Resolutionfor Screen' -> 'Resolution for Screen'
> 'Re-sizing the Image smaller' -> 'Reducing the image'
> 'Re-sizing the Image bigger' -> 'Enlarging the image'
>
> Also:
>
> 'standardPhotoshop' -> 'standard Photoshop'
> JPEG inconsistently written as JPEG jpeg and J-PEG.

I have read your critique and take on board what you have said. I have been preparing this article for over a year and have gone bog-eyed re-reading (and editing)it that many times. So unless you have some filter to check how J-peg is written, it is incredibly time consuming to pick out all those discrepancies. Even the method of carrying out a particular function changes with each new edition of PS. So I thought it was worth mentioning 'Content Aware' as it was markedly quite different to previous ways of retouching photos The reason for the poor quality of some of the images is due to compression required by my internet service provider, who won't allow me to post anything over 15MB. This article was originally over 50MB! I am in the process of sorting this problem, so please bear with me. If anybody notices any other discrepancies, spelling mistakes etc. then please let us know and that can be rectified also.
The most important thought that preoccupied me when writing the article was to make it readable , yet also anybody with access to PS could just dip into the particular area that was relevant to them. Finally thanks for all the positive comments recieved. If anybody just uses one feature in the article to improve their photography, then it has all been worthwhile.
Now I'm off to Wales and the Lakes for 3 weeks holiday and hopefully take a few snaps!
John2 - on 04 Nov 2010
In reply to UKC Articles: 'Recovery is the opposite of Exposure - it's meant to affect the shadows (dark parts) of your image, also known as the black point. If there are areas that are too dark and you can't see details you think should be there, do the same as with the Exposure slider - slide it to the right to bring the levels up, slide it to the left to bring them down'

In Lightroom at least the idea of the Recovery slider is to recover overexposed areas of the photograph. The more it is slid to the right the more overexposed areas will recover detail.
Toby S - on 05 Nov 2010
In reply to Sean Kelly:

I would have though UKC had an ftp site that you could drop the original file in to? That or one of the 'mail big file' sites might have done a job for you.

Good article though, I'll be referring back to that a fair bit I think!
Tom_Harding - on 05 Nov 2010
Oh the irony of a photogrphy article where all the photos have been uploaded at the wrong bit-depth/pallete...
Jamie Wakeham - on 05 Nov 2010
Really good article, lots of useful information at a very sensible level of detail. Well done. It would benefit hugely from re-uploading at a more appropriate quality.

Two things jarred for me, though. In the first paragraph, "simpler one-click-fix software should suffice (for e.g. Gimp..." - the GIMP is many things, but simpler?

Also, call me a pedant (and a pedantic physicist at that) but kelvin are just kelvin, not degrees kelvin. Centigrade are degrees because there are a defined number of degrees (100 of them, to be precise) between the freezing and boiling points of water. Kelvin are on an absolute scale.

Off to have a look at the first article, which I somehow missed!

Best,
Jamie
Sean Kelly - on 17 Nov 2010
In reply to UKC Articles: Better quality images have now been uploaded to the article. You might need to refresh to view. Hope this keeps all you snappers happy!

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