/ NEW ARTICLE: Beginner's Bouldering How to get started.

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UKC Articles - on 14 Dec 2010
Anna Stor, Rocklands, South Africa (3), 4 kbUKC Editor Jack Geldard takes any would-be boulderer through the basics.

What is bouldering? How to get started? What kit is needed? Where to go?

All the answers, plus inspirational photographs from the UKC User galleries.

Read more at http://www.ukclimbing.com/articles/page.php?id=3100

James Oswald - on 14 Dec 2010
In reply to UKC Articles:
A good article Jack.
:)
It's worth noting that to really improve the way you move you need to try and understand not just what you did to climb a problem. I.e. all the little things that can and do make the crucial difference between completing a problem and not completing it. e.g. flagging with your left foot, changing the ankle position slightly to allow more tension from a heel hook. It also makes a huge difference if you try to understand why these minute details make a big difference. I blabbed on a bit here but it's explained much better here. http://onlineclimbingcoach.blogspot.com/search/label/Technique%20Drills
Great article.
Cheers
James
James Oswald - on 14 Dec 2010
In reply to James Oswald:
P.s. I'm sure you're aware of this but not everyone does (I didn't) and it seemed (to me) like useful information for improving.
Cheers
James
shark - on 14 Dec 2010
In reply to UKC Articles:

You linked useful local websites for Lakes etc but missed www.peakbouldering.info for the Peak District
Justin T - on 14 Dec 2010
In reply to UKC Articles:

A good article but missed some info any new boulderer could probably do knowing:

-Clean rock shoes vs normal shoes isn't just about better grip, it's about not damaging soft rock in some locations (font being a prime example) with gritty shoes.
-Similarly bouldering mat in some locations serves a dual role in minimising wear and tear on landing spots for popular problems.
-Could have mentioned the concept of not excessively chalking problems / cleaning tick-marks etc after use, particularly important in terms of access in locations visible to non-climbers.
James Oswald - on 14 Dec 2010
In reply to UKC Articles:
You could also explain how and why squeaking ones boots is useful.
James :)
Sircumfrins - on 14 Dec 2010
In reply to UKC Articles: Excellent article! You forgot one essential piece of equipment...BEANIE.

Enough said.

:0)
mark s - on 14 Dec 2010
In reply to James Oswald:
> (In reply to UKC Articles)
> You could also explain how and why squeaking ones boots is useful.
> James :)

its about learning the basics of bouldering .not onsighting the very big and very small
James Oswald - on 14 Dec 2010
In reply to mark s:
Squeaking your boots is pretty basic.
maybe_si - on 14 Dec 2010
In reply to UKC Articles:

great article, i especially like that you make sure people know what is and isnt cool, this is crucial!!
mark s - on 14 Dec 2010
In reply to James Oswald: ive done it about 3 times and that was only because i was copying my mate
Kid Spatula - on 14 Dec 2010
In reply to UKC Articles:


Also forgot another basic, chest wax and fake tan.
simes303 - on 15 Dec 2010
In reply to maybe_si:
> (In reply to UKC Articles)
>
> great article, i especially like that you make sure people know what is and isnt cool, this is crucial!!

I just thought it was sad.
theoriginalmoggy on 16 Dec 2010
In reply to UKC Articles:

So the key takeaway is that it's important to look cool.

Beanies, fake tan, wax have all been mentioned. Can I add wraparound sunglasses worn when not needed and taking ones shirt off at every opportunity*?


*This will only be considered cool as long as one a)has a buff physique and b)is unlikely to tread on ones own nipples
gav - on 16 Dec 2010
In reply to UKC Articles:

For me, if this is truly a "getting started" article, it's missing some key information - namely /literally/ where do you start?

When I first started bouldering, I had the book, I had the pad, I had the shoes - that much was obvious. Standing at the bottom of a boulder, though, what wasn't obvious was where to place my hands, if the book doesn't explicitly point out any starting holds and doesn't say it's a sit-start. If I can reach the top should I just grab it and mantle? Should I have my hands below shoulder-height, say? Should I try and sit-start it anyway?

This, for me, is the vital piece and is missing from this article as well as the guide books. To someone who boulders or climbs a lot, it may seem obvious; but then that's not who the article is aimed at.

--Gavin
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alx - on 24 Dec 2010
In reply to UKC Articles:

The problem Ocean is at Quantum Field, Castle Hill not Flock Hill :-)

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