/ NEWS: Stanage for Sale?

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UKC News - on 21 Apr 2011
September evening, Stanage plantation, 3 kbStanage Edge may be leased or sold, the Peak District National Park Authority has revealed.

Read more at http://www.ukclimbing.com/news/item.php?id=61783
veteye - on 21 Apr 2011
In reply to UKC News:
First thoughts if it is true, is could we get together a cooperative of people willing to put some money into a fund?(I am not sure if the BMC would move quickly on this otherwise due to the management structure(not a criticism))
I read earlier that the upkeep was 60,000 pa.I would be willing to give 300 per annum to keep it in the right hands.199 other people of like mind would help with that figure.Of course it is not that straight forward,but I just thought I would bring up some ideas.
Rob
Jimbo W on 21 Apr 2011
In reply to veteye:

Also... ..not sure if the same as here in Scotland, but a community right to buy could be organised. Which gives the local interested community first dibs in any potential sale of the land, allowing 6months to organise funds.
Chris the Tall - on 21 Apr 2011
In reply to UKC News:
On the one hand I'm quite happy if the National Trust will buy it. I'm a member and I know they'll do a good job managing it. They haave good links with the BMC and a clear vision for Eastern/Sheffield Moors.

But on the other hand the government knows this and is effectively plundering the assets of a charity so it can reduce spending on National Parks
Simon Caldwell - on 21 Apr 2011
In reply to Chris the Tall:
Personally I'd rather donate to the NT voluntarily, than have the Government take the money from me by force and waste much of it on the usual bureaucracy before giving what's left to the NPA.
Hardonicus - on 21 Apr 2011
In reply to Toreador:

Oh God. Think of the car parking charge if the NT get their hands on it...
highclimber - on 21 Apr 2011
In reply to Hardonicus:
> (In reply to Toreador)
>
> Oh God. Think of the car parking charge if the NT get their hands on it...

A car park charge might be a positive way of keeping numbers of cars down. I wouldn't be adverse to a compulsory charge.
gribble - on 21 Apr 2011
In reply to highclimber:

I most certainly would be averse to a cumpolsory charge. I've had my cars broken into several times in the Peak and I do not feel it's OK to pay for the 'privelege'. Car parking at Stanage is manageable generally, though this weekend may be the exception!
veteye - on 21 Apr 2011
In reply to UKC News:
Anyway, who is the minister who should get grief from us about this?
Hardonicus - on 21 Apr 2011
In reply to highclimber:

Don't talk soft!
Steeve - on 21 Apr 2011
In reply to UKC News:
If they want to reduce spending on national parks, but maintain the status of the area, why not just hand it over to the national trust?
unless an organisation plans to make profit out of the area (which I'm not into) why would they buy it?
unless they are a charity, in which case, why doesnt the government just hand it over whoever can look after it best? (NT surely?)
hwackerhage - on 22 Apr 2011
In reply to UKC News:

Glad to live in Scotland where the wild land is shared by all.
In reply to hwackerhage: ...after a fashion. I don't think Scotland's that impressive for the amount of publicly owned or even community owned land. It's mostly toffs and rich foreigners. At least we're free to use it all, none of that faff with rights of way and CROW/non-CROW land.

cdm climber on 22 Apr 2011 - cpc3-thor5-2-0-cust321.14-2.cable.virginmedia.com
In reply to Dan Bailey - UKHillwalking.com: Ha Ha! Are you seriously trying to suggest England is a toff free land? Or simply that the toffs in England are far more likely to allow hill walkers and climbers onto there land? If so...get a grip mate.
richprideaux - on 22 Apr 2011
In reply to cdm climber:

I thik Dan is suggesting that a lot of the upland in Scotland is owned by big estates, which in turn are often owned by non-resident 'toff' landowners or foreign investors...

England (and Wales) upland areas tend to be more owned as part of farms, trusts, or by other bodies. Big areas are owned by estates, but not to the same acreage as in Scotland.
tony on 22 Apr 2011
In reply to cdm climber:
> (In reply to Dan Bailey - UKHillwalking.com) Ha Ha! Are you seriously trying to suggest England is a toff free land? Or simply that the toffs in England are far more likely to allow hill walkers and climbers onto there land? If so...get a grip mate.

He's not saying either of those things. All he's saying is that for all the benefits of Scotland's access laws compared with those in England, most of the land in Scotland is still owned by old landed families who have owned estates for aeons, or by wealthy individuals, some of whom happen to be foreigners, such as Mohammed el Fayed, and the Tetrapak family.

He's not saying anything about land ownership in England, or about land owners' attitudes to access in England.
In reply to cdm climber: ...what Shingsowa and Tony said
dave555 - on 23 Apr 2011
In reply to veteye: The only person who WILL get GRIEF is whoever buy's Stanage or the Roaches and then stops climbing in anyway ! I personally wont use word's to sort it out !! NO one own's the the rock , they dont have the right to SELL the rock , so if you do BUY the rock ( whoever you are ) i dont care if your a toff , rich , fancy title'd , head of national trust, prince charly or the queen , i'd rather die than not be allowed to climb at stanage and you WILL have to take my life to stop me ! BE WARNED ! ! !
3leggeddog on 23 Apr 2011
In reply to Chris the Tall:

> But on the other hand the government knows this and is effectively plundering the assets of a charity so it can reduce spending on National Parks

My thoughts exactly, it is in effect a privatistion of Nat Parks. Central gov have seen chartites buy land and are cashing in on it.

Potential buyers could be Nat trust (OK) BMC (good but probably too costly for them) RSPB (could be really bad)

My cynical side thinks that this like the forestry sell off is a smoke screen gesture, a loss loser, to divert the electorate away from the most invidious of policies that will be snook in behind the public outrage.
hwackerhage - on 25 Apr 2011
In reply to Dan Bailey - UKHillwalking.com:

Hi Dan, yes, you are right. It is the access legislation, not the ownership, which makes Scotland special. I remember living in Preston where the Trough of Bowland was a no go area because the Duke of Westminster was allowed to put 'no trespassing' signs up. This is one of the reasons why I moved to Scotland and I haven't regretted it. Henning
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NickD - on 26 Apr 2011
In reply to dave555:
> I personally wont use word's to sort it out !!

Probably wise.

Presumably if the leand is ever sold it will not affect access rights, and the new owners/leaseholders won't be all that interested in the edges when the "money" in the land will be in shooting on the moor.

On.it - on 26 Apr 2011
In reply to dave555: They do OWN the rock.

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